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I have two files: masterlist.txt that has hundreds of lines of URLs, and toupdate.txt that has a smaller number of updated versions of lines from the masterlist.txt file that need to be replaced.

I'd like to be able to automate this process using Bash, since the creation and utilisation of these lists is already occuring in a bash script.

The server part of the URL is the part that changes, so we could match using the unique part: /whatever/whatever_user.xml, but how to find and replace those lines in masterlist.txt? i.e. how to go through each line of toupdate.txt and as it ends in /f_SomeName/f_SomeName_user.xml, find that ending in masterlist.txt and replace that whole line with the new one?

So https://123456url.domain.com/26/path/f_SomeName/f_SomeName_user.xml becomes https://new-123.domain.com/1/path/f_SomeName/f_SomeName_user.xml for example.

The rest of masterlist.txt needs to stay intact, so we must only find and replace lines that have different servers for the same line endings (IDs).

Structure

masterlist.txt looks like this:

https://123456url.domain.com/26/path/f_SomeName/f_SomeName_user.xml
https://456789url.domain.com/32/path/f_AnotherName/f_AnotherName_user.xml
https://101112url.domain.com/1/path/g_SomethingElse/g_SomethingElse_user.xml
https://222blah11.domain.com/19/path/e_BlahBlah/e_BlahBlah_user.xml
[...]

toupdate.txt looks like this:

https://new-123.domain.com/1/path/f_SomeName/f_SomeName_user.xml
https://foo-254.domain.com/8/path/g_SomethingElse/g_SomethingElse_user.xml

Desired Result

Make masterlist.txt look like:

https://new-123.domain.com/1/path/f_SomeName/f_SomeName_user.xml
https://456789url.domain.com/32/path/f_AnotherName/f_AnotherName_user.xml
https://foo-254.domain.com/8/path/g_SomethingElse/g_SomethingElse_user.xml
https://222blah11.domain.com/19/path/e_BlahBlah/e_BlahBlah_user.xml
[...]

Initial workup

I've looked at sed but I don't know how to do the find and replace using lines from the two files?

Here's what I have so far, doing the file handling at least:

#!/bin/bash

#...

while read -r line; do
    # there's a new link on each line
    link="${line}"
    # extract the unique part from the end of each line
    grabXML="${link##*/}"
    grabID="${grabXML%_user.xml}"
    # if we cannot grab the ID, then just set it to use the full link so we don't have an empty string
    if [ -n "${grabID}" ]; then
        identifier=${grabID}
    else
        identifier="${line}"
    fi
    
    ## the find and replace here? ##    

# we're done when we've reached the end of the file
done < "masterlist.txt"
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2 Answers 2

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Would you please try the following:

#!/bin/bash

declare -A map
while IFS= read -r line; do
    if [[ $line =~ (/[^/]+/[^/]*\.xml)$ ]]; then
        uniq_part="${BASH_REMATCH[1]}"
        map[$uniq_part]=$line
    fi
done < "toupdate.txt"

while IFS= read -r line; do
    if [[ $line =~ (/[^/]+/[^/]*\.xml)$ ]]; then
        uniq_part="${BASH_REMATCH[1]}"
        if [[ -n ${map[$uniq_part]} ]]; then
            line=${map[$uniq_part]}
        fi
    fi
    echo "$line"
done < "masterlist.txt" > "masterlist_tmp.txt"

# if the result of "masterlist_tmp.txt" is good enough, uncomment the line below
# mv -f -- "masterlist_tmp.txt" "masterlist.txt"

result:

https://new-123.domain.com/1/path/f_SomeName/f_SomeName_user.xml
https://456789url.domain.com/32/path/f_AnotherName/f_AnotherName_user.xml
https://foo-254.domain.com/8/path/g_SomethingElse/g_SomethingElse_user.xml
https://222blah11.domain.com/19/path/e_BlahBlah/e_BlahBlah_user.xml

[Explanations]

  • The associative array map maps the "unique part" such as /f_SomeName/f_SomeName_user.xml to the "full path" such as https://new-123.domain.com/1/path/f_SomeName/f_SomeName_user.xml.
  • The regex (/[^/]+/[^/]*\.xml)$, if matched, assigns the shell variable BASH_REMATCH[1] to the substring from the second rightmost slash to the extention ".xml" at the end of the string.
  • In the first loop on the file "toupdate.txt", it generates "unique part" and "fill path" pairs as key-value pairs of the associative array.
  • In the second loop on the file "masterlist.txt", the extracted "unique part" is tested if the associated value exists. If so, the line is substituted with the associated value, the line in "toupdate.txt" file.

[Alternative]
If the text files are large in size, bash may not be fast enough. In such a case, awk script will work more efficiently:

awk 'NR==FNR {
    if (match($0, "/[^/]+/[^/]*\\.xml$")) {
        map[substr($0, RSTART, RLENGTH)] = $0
    }
    next
}
{
    if (match($0, "/[^/]+/[^/]*\\.xml$")) {
        full_path = map[substr($0, RSTART, RLENGTH)]
        if (full_path != "") {
            $0 = full_path
        }
    }
    print
}' "toupdate.txt" "masterlist.txt" > "masterlist_tmp.txt"

[Explanations]

  • The NR==FNR { BLOCK1; next } { BLOCK2 } syntax is a common idiom to switch the processing individually for each file. As the NR==FNR condition meets only for the 1st file in the argument list and next statement skips the following block, BLOCK1 processes the file "toupdate.txt" only. Similarly BLOCK2 processes the file "masterlist.txt" only.
  • If the function match($0, pattern) succeeds, it sets the awk variable RSTART to the start position of the matched substring out of $0, the current record read from the file, then sets the variable RLENGTH to the length of the matched substring. Now we can extract the matched substring such as /f_SomeName/f_SomeName_user.xml by using the substr() function.
  • Then we assign the array map so that the substring (the unique part) is mapped to the whole url in "toupdate.txt".
  • The second block works mostly similar to the first block. If the value corresponding to the key is found in the array map, then the record ($0) is replaced with the value of the array indexed by the key.
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  • I like the awk answer! Thanks.
    – algalg
    Jan 24, 2021 at 15:41
  • Could you explain a bit more about how the awk answer works, please?
    – algalg
    Jan 24, 2021 at 16:03
  • @nooblag Look at stackoverflow.com/q/32481877/3220113 for an explanation of a similar awk command.
    – Walter A
    Jan 24, 2021 at 22:20
  • 1
    Thank you for the feedback. I've added small explanations of the awk script in my answer.
    – tshiono
    Jan 25, 2021 at 0:29
2

Why not have sed write its own script - producing the desired output,

sed -e "$(sed -e 's<^\(http[s]*://[^/]*/[^/]*/\)\(.*\)<\\|\2\$| s|.*|\1\2|<' toupdate.txt)" masterlist.txt

where

  • the inner sed command has an outer and an inner substitution command
  • outer s (s<...<...<) captures scheme://domain/N/ as \1 and rest-of-path \(.*\) as \2 and inserts them into a script for the outer sed command
  • outer sed script (\|\2$| s|.*|\1\2|) finds URLs in masterlist.txt ending in rest-of-path, substituting (inner s) the new URL from toupdate.txt
  • to avoid a lot of backslash-escaping < and | are used as delimiters for the two s commands, and \|...| is used for /.../
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  • Thank you. If I understand correctly, I should note that ... is not literal, I'm using an ellipsis there in the excerpt of the masterlist.txt to denote "and so on." I'll add some brackets to help clear that up?
    – algalg
    Jan 24, 2021 at 21:29
  • @nooblag Yes. In my explanation I used ... instead of an ellipsis sign (U+2026), not as a literal; and I understood yours to be an ellipsis, too.
    – urznow
    Jan 24, 2021 at 22:13

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