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I am working with very large DataFrames in Julia resulting in out of memory errors when I do joins and other manipulations on the data. Fortunately the the data can be partitioned on an identifier column. I want to persist the partitioned DataFrame using the record batches feature build into Arrow.jl, and then read and process each record batch in turn. I have managed to get the following to work, but are unable to get the original DataFrame back on reading the data. On reading back the data I get a DataFrame with all the data in each column an array of the data in the original partition. I don't know whether my problem is how I am creating the partitions in the first place or on how I am reading back the data:

using Random
using DataFrames
using Arrow

function nextidrange(minId, maxId, batchsize, i)
    fromId = minId + batchsize * (i-1)
    toId = min(maxId, (minId + batchsize * i)-1)
    return fromId, toId
end

minId = 1
maxId = 1000
idrange = (maxId - minId) + 1
df = DataFrame(ID=minId:maxId, B=rand(idrange), C=randstring.(fill(5,idrange)));
batchsize = 100
batches = ceil(Int32, idrange / batchsize)
partitions = Array{SubDataFrame}(undef, 0)
for i = 1:batches
    fromId, toId = nextidrange(minId, maxId, batchsize, i)
    push!(partitions, filter([:ID] => x -> fromId <= x <= toId, df; view = true))
end
io = IOBuffer()
Arrow.write(io, partitions)
seekstart(io)
batches = Arrow.Stream(io)
for b in batches
  bt = b |> DataFrame
  println("Rows = $(nrow(bt))")
end

For each record batch I am expecting a DataFrame with three columns and 100 rows of data. Implementation notes: In the actual data there may be gaps in the identifier values. I have considered using JuliaDB, but DataFrames appears to be much better maintained and supported.

2 Answers 2

2

I have resolved my problem, like this:

using Random
using DataFrames
using Arrow
using Tables

function nextidrange(minId, maxId, batchsize, i)
    fromId = minId + batchsize * (i-1)
    toId = min(maxId, (minId + batchsize * i)-1)
    return fromId, toId
end

minId = 1
maxId = 1000
idrange = (maxId - minId) + 1
df = DataFrame(ID=minId:maxId, B=rand(idrange), C=randstring.(fill(5,idrange)));
batchsize = 100
numbatches = ceil(Int32, idrange / batchsize)
partitions = Array{SubDataFrame}(undef, 0)
for i = 1:numbatches 
    fromId, toId = nextidrange(minId, maxId, batchsize, i)
    push!(partitions, filter([:ID] => x -> fromId <= x <= toId, df; view = true))
end
io = IOBuffer()
Arrow.write(io, Tables.partitioner(partitions))
seekstart(io)
recordbatches = Arrow.Stream(io)
ab = Array{DataFrame}(undef,0)
for b in recordbatches 
  bt = b |> DataFrame
  println("Rows = $(nrow(bt))")
  push!(ab,bt)
end

The issue was that the array of DataFrame views should be placed in a call to Tables.partitioner

3
  • Yeah, that's the right way to do it (primary Tables.jl and Arrow.jl author here). Did the Arrow.jl docs provide enough direction for your use-case here? I've been thinking we could probably include some more examples for people.
    – quinnj
    Jan 25, 2021 at 18:02
  • To some extend, the statement "Note you can turn multiple table objects into partitions by doing Tables.partitioner([tbl1, tbl2, ...])" was really the only concrete clue. To read batches, I had to delve into the source code and test cases. If I have n Arrow files on disk, all with the same schema, how do I concatenate those into a single Arrow file where each file is a record batch? Great libraries btw, appreciated. Busy converting a Java-based data processing pipeline that use to take 10-12 days, it looks like I will get it down to a day using Julia. Jan 26, 2021 at 3:44
  • 1
    To concatenate existing arrow files w/ the same schema, I'd do something like: julia Arrow.write("concatenated.arrow", Tables.partitioner(x->Arrow.Table(x), arrow_files)) where arrow_files is an array of arrow files as strings. Note that this "functional" form of Tables.partitioner applies the mapping function lazily as each partition is processed, to avoid having to load all the arrow tables at once in memory.
    – quinnj
    Jan 27, 2021 at 4:31
0

I think beginning with DataFrames v1.5.0 you can partition a DataFrame directly and write Arrow.write(filename, Iterators.partition(df, n)) as noted by Bogumił Kamiński.

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