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I need to remove all characters from a string which aren't in a-z A-Z 0-9 set or are not spaces.

Does anyone have a function to do this?

7 Answers 7

799

Sounds like you almost knew what you wanted to do already, you basically defined it as a regex.

preg_replace("/[^A-Za-z0-9 ]/", '', $string);
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  • 11
    zuk1: regexbuddy is a great help with that
    – relipse
    May 12, 2014 at 17:13
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    Here's an example if you want to include the hyphen as an allowed character. I needed this because I needed to strip out disallowed characters from a Moodle username, based on email addresses: preg_replace("/[^a-z0-9_.@\-]/", '', $string); May 22, 2014 at 15:17
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    Would this work exactly the same with apostrophes (single-quotes) around the regular expression, instead of quotation marks (double-quotes)? E.g: preg_replace('/[^A-Za-z0-9 ]/', '', $string);
    – 2540625
    Mar 20, 2015 at 17:46
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    We want explanation about this :) . People come here to see Why it is the way it is. Please consider Regex explanation too! Thanks
    – Pratik
    Dec 6, 2015 at 10:44
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    What if we want to keep accentued characters?
    – wonzbak
    Jun 23, 2016 at 9:00
188

For unicode characters, it is :

preg_replace("/[^[:alnum:][:space:]]/u", '', $string);
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  • hi voondo , what's with the /ui thing.. what do you call it ? can anyone please shed me some light. Thank you. Feb 28, 2014 at 7:39
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    For clarification, they're called flags. They're put after the closing delimiter (in this case it's "/", but it could be "~" or "@" or whatever character you want to use as long as the opening and closing delimiters are the same) and change the behavior of the expression.
    – Doktor J
    Apr 13, 2014 at 22:04
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    Btw, \w includes \d and so the \d is unnecessary. Also, this is wrong because it will also leave underscores in the resulting string (which is also included in \w).
    – smathy
    Aug 16, 2014 at 20:42
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    There's still an error in this, the character classes need to be terminated with ':]' so the correct line would be: preg_replace("/[^[:alnum:][:space:]]/ui", '', $string);
    – h00ligan
    Nov 17, 2014 at 14:03
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    Is the i flag really necessary here since [:alnum:] already covers both cases? Sep 25, 2015 at 12:28
57

Regular expression is your answer.

$str = preg_replace('/[^a-z\d ]/i', '', $str);
  • The i stands for case insensitive.
  • ^ means, does not start with.
  • \d matches any digit.
  • a-z matches all characters between a and z. Because of the i parameter you don't have to specify a-z and A-Z.
  • After \d there is a space, so spaces are allowed in this regex.
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    We want explanation about this :) . People come here to see Why it is the way it is. Please consider Regex explanation too! Not everyone is advanced enough to know what you wrote there without explanation. Thanks
    – Pratik
    Dec 6, 2015 at 10:48
  • @PratikCJoshi The i stands for case insensitive. ^ means, does not start with. \d matches any digit. a-z matches all characters between a and z. Because of the i parameter you don't have to specify a-z and A-Z. After \d there is a space, so spaces are allows in this regex.
    – bart
    Feb 10, 2016 at 4:21
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    People don't read comments as answer. Please update answer!
    – Pratik
    Feb 10, 2016 at 8:54
34

If you need to support other languages, instead of the typical A-Z, you can use the following:

preg_replace('/[^\p{L}\p{N} ]+/', '', $string);
  • [^\p{L}\p{N} ] defines a negated (It will match a character that is not defined) character class of:
    • \p{L}: a letter from any language.
    • \p{N}: a numeric character in any script.
    • : a space character.
  • + greedily matches the character class between 1 and unlimited times.

This will preserve letters and numbers from other languages and scripts as well as A-Z:

preg_replace('/[^\p{L}\p{N} ]+/', '', 'hello-world'); // helloworld
preg_replace('/[^\p{L}\p{N} ]+/', '', 'abc@~#123-+=öäå'); // abc123öäå
preg_replace('/[^\p{L}\p{N} ]+/', '', '你好世界!@£$%^&*()'); // 你好世界

Note: This is a very old, but still relevant question. I am answering purely to provide supplementary information that may be useful to future visitors.

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  • Works for me if I add unicode u flag at the end of the regex -- /[^\p{L}\p{N} ]+/u
    – vatavale
    Sep 11, 2021 at 16:52
17

here's a really simple regex for that:

\W|_

and used as you need it (with a forward / slash delimiter).

preg_replace("/\W|_/", '', $string);

Test it here with this great tool that explains what the regex is doing:

http://www.regexr.com/

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    You still need the /u flag otherwise non-ascii letters are also removed.
    – Xeoncross
    Dec 30, 2014 at 19:52
  • Neat but would also match spaces and if this is wanted, probably could double the performance by use of a character class and additional quantifier for one or more [\W_]+ Dec 31, 2016 at 2:00
15
[\W_]+

 

$string = preg_replace("/[\W_]+/u", '', $string);

It select all not A-Z, a-z, 0-9 and delete it.

See example here: https://regexr.com/3h1rj

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    what does this regex /[\W_]+/u means ? Dec 4, 2017 at 17:38
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    \W is the inverse of \w which are characters A-Za-z0-9_. So \W will match any character that is not A-Za-z0-9_ and remove them. The [] is a character set boundary. The+ is redundant on a character set boundary but normally means 1 or more character. The u flag expands the expression to include unicode character support, meaning it will not remove characters beyond character code 255 such as ª²³µ . Example of various usages 3v4l.org/hSVV5 with unicode and ascii characters.
    – Will B.
    Apr 25, 2019 at 14:33
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preg_replace("/\W+/", '', $string)

You can test it here : http://regexr.com/

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    Per @Alex Stevens answer, this doesn't catch underscores "_". Aug 11, 2017 at 18:38
  • i mean to be fair underscores aren't alphanumeric
    – John
    Sep 16 at 14:41

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