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I know this is probably a very rare question.

I have a service written with Delphi, and a client written with C#. The Delphi service tries to read a 10-byte Extended data type from the C# client.

After some research, I found some sample code in C# to convert a 10-byte Extended to a number (Convert Delphi Extended to C#). But I couldn't find any sample to convert a number to a 10-byte Extended, so that I can send it back to the service.

I tried to write code by myself, but the calculation is very difficult for me to understand.

Can anyone help me?

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  • 3
    If I were you I'd stop using Extended and use Double instead. – David Heffernan Jan 27 at 7:33
  • Thanks for the suggestion and I do agree using Double will be much easier, but we already deploy service to thousands of customers and we can't force them to upgrade to the latest version, the only way is to let the new C# client handle delphi extended data type. – logan_ch Jan 28 at 22:53
  • Sure. But if you fix the issue now for new versions then at some point in the future you can cut the chord to extended. – David Heffernan Jan 29 at 0:14
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Delphi (32 bit target) natively support Extended data type. You can just copy the 10 bytes in the Extended variable. For example:

const
    // Binary representation of Extended number "123456789012345678"
    Bin : array [0..9] of Byte = (0, 167, 121, 24, 211,
                                  165, 77, 219, 55, 64);
procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
    V   : Extended;
    I    : Integer;
begin
    V := PExtended(@Bin[0])^;  // Copy Bin to V
    Memo1.Lines.Add(Format('%22f', [V]));
end;

The binary format for extended data type can be found here. A better description of the format is here.

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  • Only in 32-bit applications, though. – Andreas Rejbrand Jan 27 at 7:11
  • @AndreasRejbrand What are you going to do with an 80 bit float in 64 bit code anyway? – David Heffernan Jan 27 at 9:15
  • Thanks for the answer, please let me make it clear. Our project always target 32 windows, so the extended data type should be always 10 bytes even I'm using Delphi Tokyo. I don't have problem with Delphi Service and Client, but the new client is C#, C# doesn't have 10 bytes number type, so I need to convert decimal or double to 10 Bytes in extended format in C# code, then send the 10 bytes back to Delphi service, that is the difficult for me. – logan_ch Jan 28 at 23:01
  • Write a Delphi DLL that exports functions to convert between extended and double and call the dll from your C# code. Nice simple way to solve the problem. – David Heffernan Jan 29 at 0:13
  • @logan part of your problem here is that your question doesn't make it at all clear that your requirement is to perform the conversion in C#. – David Heffernan Jan 29 at 0:24
0

Sorry for not make question clear, but thanks for all the comments here.

I got the code working, it looks not that perfect, but unit testing is passed.

Thanks for the link sent by @fpiette, it gave me bellow thoughts.

public static byte[] WriteExtendedToBuffer(double value)
    {
        var extendedBuffer = Enumerable.Repeat((byte)0x0, 10).ToArray();
        if (!double.IsNaN(value) && !double.IsInfinity(value) && (value != 0))
        {
            var doubleBuff = BitConverter.GetBytes(value);
            var sign = doubleBuff[7] & 0x80;
            doubleBuff[7] = (byte)(doubleBuff[7] & 0x7F);
            var exp = BitConverter.ToUInt16(doubleBuff, 6);
            doubleBuff[7] = 0;
            doubleBuff[6] = (byte)(doubleBuff[6] & 0x0F);
            var massive = BitConverter.ToUInt64(doubleBuff);
            exp >>= 4;
            if (exp == 0)
            {
                exp = 16383 - 1022;
                Buffer.BlockCopy(BitConverter.GetBytes(exp), 0, extendedBuffer, 8, 2);
                extendedBuffer[9] = (byte)(extendedBuffer[9] | sign);
                massive <<= 11;
                Buffer.BlockCopy(BitConverter.GetBytes(massive), 0, extendedBuffer, 0, 8);
            }
            else
            {
                exp = (ushort)(16383 + exp - 1023);
                Buffer.BlockCopy(BitConverter.GetBytes(exp), 0, extendedBuffer, 8, 2);
                extendedBuffer[9] = (byte)(extendedBuffer[9] | sign);
                massive <<= 11;
                Buffer.BlockCopy(BitConverter.GetBytes(massive), 0, extendedBuffer, 0, 8);
                extendedBuffer[7] = (byte)(extendedBuffer[7] | 0x80);
            }
        }
        return extendedBuffer;
    }

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