8

How can I mutate all columns containing a pattern (mutate_at I guess) using each time the previous column using dplyr? --> Here for example all column continaing foo in their name should be mutated using the column just before (i.e., a for column fooa, b for foob and so on).


set.seed(13)
dfrows = 5
df = data.frame(a = rnorm(dfrows),
                fooa = runif(dfrows),
                b = rnorm(dfrows, mean=50, sd=5),
                foob = runif(dfrows, min=0, max=5),
                c = rnorm(dfrows, mean=100, sd=10),
                fooc = runif(dfrows, min=0, max=10))
df
#            a      fooa        b      foob         c     fooc
# 1  0.5543269 0.6611216 48.26791 3.0999527  98.06053 6.035485
# 2 -0.2802719 0.8783709 51.15647 0.1586242 113.96432 2.299504
# 3  1.7751634 0.8905590 52.34582 2.3070636 101.00663 9.668332
# 4  0.1873201 0.5662805 50.58978 1.6501046  98.85561 6.045547
# 5  1.1425261 0.5935473 50.35224 3.1676038 107.02225 6.396047

library(dplyr)
df %>% mutate(fooa = fooa/100 * a,
              foob = foob/100 * b,
              fooc = fooc/100 * c)
#            a         fooa        b       foob         c     fooc
# 1  0.5543269  0.003664775 48.26791 1.49628246  98.06053 5.918428
# 2 -0.2802719 -0.002461827 51.15647 0.08114656 113.96432 2.620614
# 3  1.7751634  0.015808878 52.34582 1.20765132 101.00663 9.765657
# 4  0.1873201  0.001060757 50.58978 0.83478430  98.85561 5.976363
# 5  1.1425261  0.006781434 50.35224 1.59495949 107.02225 6.845194

# Equivalently, in base R:
for (i in c(2, 4, 6)) {
  df[,i] = df[,i]/100 * df[, i-1]
}

So I am looking for something like this I guess:

# What should <PREVIOUS_COLUMN> be?
df %>% mutate_at(vars(contains('foo')), funs(./100 * <PREVIOUS_COLUMN>)) 

# OR, even better (more generic but in my case it will always be the previous column):
df %>% mutate_at(vars(contains('foo')), funs(./100 * <COLUMN_NAME_WITH_'foo'_PATTERN_REMOVED>)) 

EDIT: I should have mentioned that the original data.frame could contain more columns, possibly with another pattern than X then fooX, so that the ideal solution should be able to localize them properly (but I'll leave it as such as all answers provide nice solutions and features).

A better example would have been:

set.seed(13)
dfrows = 5
df = data.frame(a = rnorm(dfrows),
                fooa = runif(dfrows),
                b = rnorm(dfrows, mean=50, sd=5),
                foob = runif(dfrows, min=0, max=5),
                bla = 5,
                c = rnorm(dfrows, mean=100, sd=10),
                fooc = runif(dfrows, min=0, max=10),
                blo = 8)
df
#            a      fooa        b      foob bla         c     fooc blo
# 1  0.5543269 0.6611216 48.26791 3.0999527   5  98.06053 6.035485   8
# 2 -0.2802719 0.8783709 51.15647 0.1586242   5 113.96432 2.299504   8
# 3  1.7751634 0.8905590 52.34582 2.3070636   5 101.00663 9.668332   8
# 4  0.1873201 0.5662805 50.58978 1.6501046   5  98.85561 6.045547   8
# 5  1.1425261 0.5935473 50.35224 3.1676038   5 107.02225 6.396047   8
3

Here is another approach using across() and cur_column(). I personally would not recommend to make calculations based on the position of columns, and would instead recommend to work with the columns names, since this seems safer.

In the example below we loop over the columns a,b and c with across and access the values of each corresponding foo column by using get() and cur_column.

set.seed(13)
dfrows = 5
df = data.frame(a = rnorm(dfrows),
                fooa = runif(dfrows),
                b = rnorm(dfrows, mean=50, sd=5),
                foob = runif(dfrows, min=0, max=5),
                c = rnorm(dfrows, mean=100, sd=10),
                fooc = runif(dfrows, min=0, max=10))

library(dplyr)

df %>% 
  mutate(across(matches("^[a-z]$"),
                ~ get(paste0("foo", cur_column())) / 100 * .x,
                .names = "foo{col}"))
#>            a         fooa        b       foob         c     fooc
#> 1  0.5543269  0.003664775 48.26791 1.49628246  98.06053 5.918428
#> 2 -0.2802719 -0.002461827 51.15647 0.08114656 113.96432 2.620614
#> 3  1.7751634  0.015808878 52.34582 1.20765132 101.00663 9.765657
#> 4  0.1873201  0.001060757 50.58978 0.83478430  98.85561 5.976363
#> 5  1.1425261  0.006781434 50.35224 1.59495949 107.02225 6.845194

Created on 2021-01-27 by the reprex package (v0.3.0)

2
  • 1
    Accepted as this seems actually to be the most generic and resilient solution (i.e., works whatever the original data.frame looks like). I indeed agree with the recommendation to work with column names. And the get() + cur_column() was probably what I was looking for (as well as across() instead of mutate_at()). Thanks! – ztl Jan 27 at 10:25
  • With the tidyselect helpers we can improve the variable selection using matches("^[a-z]$") instead of manually specifying c(a,b,c). I updated my answer accordingly. – TimTeaFan Jan 27 at 10:29
4

This is actually vectorised operation so you can do this without any loops.

Using vector recycling :

df[, c(FALSE, TRUE)] <- df[, c(FALSE, TRUE)]/100 * df[, c(TRUE, FALSE)]
df

#           a         fooa        b       foob         c     fooc
#1  0.5543269  0.003664775 48.26791 1.49628246  98.06053 5.918428
#2 -0.2802719 -0.002461827 51.15647 0.08114656 113.96432 2.620614
#3  1.7751634  0.015808878 52.34582 1.20765132 101.00663 9.765657
#4  0.1873201  0.001060757 50.58978 0.83478430  98.85561 5.976363
#5  1.1425261  0.006781434 50.35224 1.59495949 107.02225 6.845194

If you want to perform this based on names of the column.

cols <- grep('foo', names(df))
df[cols] <- df[cols]/100 * df[-cols]
2
  • So the c(F, T) is recycled over all columns? Nice, cool to learn this way of working, thanks! (However, that would only work if my data frame is only composed of an alternation of X and fooX columns, I guess? this is the case in my example so fine - but not in my real data) – ztl Jan 27 at 9:37
  • 1
    You can adjust/modify the answer based on your actual data. I added an update in the answer which performs this calculation based on names of the columns. So it does not rely on the fact the the columns should be alternate. – Ronak Shah Jan 27 at 9:43
3

One option could be:

df %>%
 mutate(across(starts_with("foo"))/100 * across(!matches("foo")))

           a         fooa        b       foob         c     fooc
1  0.5543269  0.003664775 48.26791 1.49628246  98.06053 5.918428
2 -0.2802719 -0.002461827 51.15647 0.08114656 113.96432 2.620614
3  1.7751634  0.015808878 52.34582 1.20765132 101.00663 9.765657
4  0.1873201  0.001060757 50.58978 0.83478430  98.85561 5.976363
5  1.1425261  0.006781434 50.35224 1.59495949 107.02225 6.845194
2
  • Great, thanks! But this works if the data.frame is purely a succession of X then fooX columns, not if there are additional ones (my example should have been more nasty - sorry for this) – ztl Jan 27 at 9:56
  • You can select whatever patterns, not just columns not containing foo in their name. Then, there is essentially no difference between this post and the post from @TimTeaFan. – tmfmnk Jan 27 at 10:49

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