35
class ThrowNull {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        throw null;
    }
}

We know that rule for throw is throw ThrowableInstance;, where ThrowableInstance must be an object of type Throwable or a subclass of Throwable.

Simple types, such as int or char, as well as non-Throwable classes, such as String and Object, cannot be used as exceptions. null is a special Java literal which represents a null value.

So why would throw null; compile in this code?

3
  • 4
    Why should it result in a compile-time error?
    – BoltClock
    Jul 6, 2011 at 5:33
  • Although this is not flagged as a problem by the Java Compiler itself at the present time (unless the language specification changes at some future time), it clearly is a candidate for static checkers like "Sonar" to root out and point out to the developer. Maybe the developer wanted to write "return null"... Feb 22, 2013 at 10:36
  • 2
    We know that the rule is that the result of calling String a() {return null} must be an object of (sub)class or String. Simple classes, like Throwable or BigInteger cannot be used as Strings. Null is a special Java literal which represents a null value. Then why return null is not creating any compile time error?????!!!! I am exposing your double standards here. Why do you complain about throw null but not about return null? I cannot upvote your question therefore. It is too localized by means of double standards.
    – Val
    Jul 11, 2013 at 18:20

4 Answers 4

56

According to the language specification, a throw statement is defined as:

throw Expression

And if the Expression evaluates to null, then a NullPointerException is thrown. Specifically,

If evaluation of the Expression completes normally, producing a null value, then an instance V' of class NullPointerException is created and thrown instead of null.

Since NullPointerException extends RuntimeException, it is an unchecked exception. This could explain why there's no compile-time error reported from this construct.

3
  • so null somehow converts to a NullPointer Exception, but what if I throw a String or a number? I gives runtime exception and says No exception of type String can be thrown; an exception type must be a subclass of Throwable why is it so? Apr 5, 2019 at 18:18
  • It's not that null "somehow converts" to a NPE. The language specification says that when throw gets a null value, it needs to create and throw a NullPointerException. So it does. The spec says that throw must be given "1) a variable or value of a reference type which is assignable (§5.2) to the type Throwable, or 2) the null reference". Anything else will result in a compiler error. Apr 11, 2019 at 19:23
  • It's also not clear what you would expect the language to do. A NullPointerException is commonly thrown when a value is expected but null is received (see java.io.File's constructor, for example). There's no obviously right behavior, though, for throwing an arbitrary object. (Would it generate an exception? Which one? Checked or unchecked? Or would you expect to catch an arbitrary object too? Would you catch(String s), or catch("oops")?) Letting the compiler reject unclear things is often better than having potentially surprising behavior at runtime. Apr 11, 2019 at 19:49
5

There are many things a compiler doesn't check, it assumes you do things for a good reason which it might not know about. What it does try to prevent is the common mistakes developers make.

It is possible some one thinks this is a good short hand for

throw new NullPointerException();

Integer i = null;
try {
    i.intValue();
} catch (NullPointerException npe) {
    System.err.println("Caught NPE");
    npe.printStackTrace();
}

and

try {
    throw null;
} catch (NullPointerException npe) {
    System.err.println("Caught NPE");
    npe.printStackTrace();
}

prints in Java 6 update 38

Caught NPE
java.lang.NullPointerException
    at Main.main(Main.java:9)
1
  • @DanielWerner All exceptions and Errors and catchable even OutOfmemoryError and ThreadDeath. ;) See my example. Jan 31, 2013 at 19:03
3

I think because Null can be cast in to any type of reference.so in compile time its nothing wrong if you are throwing null instead of throwable.

2
  • Exactly. Your method, that returns a String, may return null. Why string variable can be null but Throwable variable cannot? OP definitely is either short-sighted (x)or exercises the double standards.
    – Val
    Jul 11, 2013 at 18:15
  • This might sound nicely, but it isn't true. See the accepted answer.
    – Vlasec
    Feb 8, 2016 at 12:32
2

In generel, and not just throw. Any object variable can be assigned null. So we can see that throw is not a special case. Should it be? maybe. Is it consistent? Yes.

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