60

How to make sure a variable is not empty with the -z option ?

errorstatus="notnull"
if [ !-z $errorstatus ]
then
   echo "string is not null"
fi

It returns the error :

./test: line 2: [: !-z: unary operator expected
98

Of course it does. After replacing the variable, it reads [ !-z ], which is not a valid [ command. Use double quotes, or [[.

if [ ! -z "$errorstatus" ]

if [[ ! -z $errorstatus ]]
2
  • ./test: line 2: conditional binary operator expected ./test: line 2: syntax error near $errorstatus' ./test: line 2: if [[ !-z $errorstatus ]]' I already tried, and it returns as below, – Sreeraj Jul 6 '11 at 6:19
  • Thanks, by mistake I put !-z together. – Sreeraj Jul 6 '11 at 6:51
27

Why would you use -z? To test if a string is non-empty, you typically use -n:

if test -n "$errorstatus"; then
  echo errorstatus is not empty
fi
2
  • 1
    I get better results on using "! -z $1", where I'm trying to test for the existence of a value. I get a false positive when doing "-n $1", where the condition is true every time, whether there is a value in $1 or not. – jaketrent Aug 3 '12 at 14:59
  • 3
    @jtsnake test -n $1 is true when $1 is empty because it is equivalent to test -n, which is true because the string -n is non-empty. (eg, -n is not taken to be an option, but is the string that test evaluates.) test -n "$1" works fine, though. – William Pursell Aug 3 '12 at 16:05
3

I think this is the syntax you are looking for:

if [ -z != $errorstatus ] 
then
commands
else
commands
fi
2
  • 3
    Wait, what?? test -z != ?? – Otheus May 3 '16 at 12:44
  • the parameter should be quoted, otherwise it'll be an incomplete equation when the var is empty – Payam May 1 '17 at 22:33

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