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Till now I am using two try catch blocks for my queries. The first one will throw an error if the connection is not be established. The second one checks if SqlCommand is executed successfully. Like the example below

try
{
  using(varconnection=newSqlConnection())
  using(varcmd=newSqlCommand())
  {
  
    connection.Open();
    var transaction=connection.BeginTransaction();
    cmd.Connection=connection;
    cmd.Transaction=transaction;

    try
    {
     cmd.CommandText="InsertintoCustomers(Name)values('Dimitri')";
     cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();

     cmd.CommandText="InsertintoCustomers(Name)values('George')";
     cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();

     transaction.Commit();
   }
   catch
   {
     try{transaction.Rollback();}catch{}
   }
  }
}
catch
{

}

I found a second Example that looks more clear for me.

SqlTransactiontransaction=null;
using(varconnection=newSqlConnection())
using(varcmd=newSqlCommand())
{
   try
   {
   connection.Open();
   transaction=connection.BeginTransaction();
   cmd.Connection=connection;
   cmd.Transaction=transaction;

   cmd.CommandText="InsertintoCustomers(Name)values('Dimitri')";
   cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();

   cmd.CommandText="InsertintoCustomers(Name)values('George')";
   cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();

   transaction.Commit();
   transaction.Dispose();
   transaction=null;
}
catch
{
   if(transaction!=null)
   {
      try{transaction.Rollback();}catch{}
   }
 }
}

Are both of them having the same result? Which of two is more preferable?

5
  • If connection.Open(); throws, then it is useless to transaction.Rollback and it will throw a NullReferenceException (that will be caught by the second try...catch).
    – xanatos
    Jan 27 at 16:32
  • @xanatos in which case? ... in first open is outside "rollback" catch and in second there is a guard
    – Selvin
    Jan 27 at 16:35
  • 2
    Neither is preferable, your code is far too wordy even if you insist on using explicit transactions. Look up TransactionScope first. An explicit Transaction.Rollback() is almost never necessary in any case, because the rollback happens automatically if .Commit() hasn't been called by the time the transaction is disposed (which you should be doing, in a using block). Jan 27 at 16:37
  • @Selvin In the first one, the one that does the transaction.Rollback() trusting that transaction is != null... I have even seen (equivalent to the second) transaction?.Rollback() around... But the suggestions of Jeroen are much better. using everywhere you can is key to correct .NET programming
    – xanatos
    Jan 27 at 16:46
  • trusting that transaction is != null because it will be not null ... connection.BeginTransaction will returns non null transaction or throws ... but if throws then execution will end in outer empty catch and never hit rolback ... same story when connection.Open would throw
    – Selvin
    Jan 27 at 16:50
2

Neither of those two methods is good. They are too verbose.

The best method is to just put the Transaction in a using as well, also we should use a parameter for the query:

using(var connection = new SqlConnection(connString))
using(var cmd = new SqlCommand("Insert into Customers (Name) values (@Name));"))
{
    var param = cmd.Parameters.Add("@Name", SqlDbType.VarChar, insert_column_length_here);
    connection.Open();
    using(var transaction = connection.BeginTransaction())
    {
        cmd.Transaction = transaction;
        param.Value = "Dimitri";
        cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();

        param.Value = "George";
        cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();

        transaction.Commit();
    }
}

We can see that disposing the transaction object will automatically rollback if not already committed, by looking at the source code. So using will clean everything up.

If you need to catch to display a message to the user, do it outside the code i.e. put a try/catch around the whole thing. Don't do the cleanup code yourself

14
  • And where should i place try and catch? before connection open?
    – papa dp
    Jan 27 at 17:25
  • You shouldn't try or catch anything. using will handle it all. Jan 27 at 17:25
  • What if an exception will be occure?
    – papa dp
    Jan 27 at 17:27
  • using will clean everything up. If you need to catch to display a message to the user, do it outside the code i.e. put a try/catch around the whole thing. Don't do the cleanup code yourself Jan 27 at 17:28
  • This is meaningless. You need to place try and catch for making a roll back if something will go wrong. transaction.RollBack(). Except if i dont need roll back in using statement
    – papa dp
    Jan 27 at 17:31

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