2

With EF Core 5.0 Many-to-many relations are introduced. I'm getting stucked on how to update them through my asp .net api.

For One-to-one and One-to-many relations there is a convention by simply adding the property name followed by ID.

public class Blog
{
    public int BlogId { get; set; }
    public string Url { get; set; }

    public BlogImage BlogImage { get; set; }
}

public class BlogImage
{
    public int BlogImageId { get; set; }
    public byte[] Image { get; set; }
    public string Caption { get; set; }

    public int BlogId { get; set; }
    public Blog Blog { get; set; }
}

So a propper POST Request could look like

{
  "BlogId": 123,
  "Url": "example.com",
  "BlogImageID": 42
}

but I could not find out if there is a convention or how it look like for Many-to-many relations

public class Post
{
    public int PostId { get; set; }
    public string Title { get; set; }
    public string Content { get; set; }

    public ICollection<Tag> Tags { get; set; }
}

public class Tag
{
    public string TagId { get; set; }

    public ICollection<Post> Posts { get; set; }
}

Is there a convention to map the body of a http request to Many-to-many relations using EF 5.0?

0
4

Consider the following two entities which are in many-to-many relationship -

public class Post
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Title { get; set; }

    public ICollection<Tag> Tags { get; set; }
}

public class Tag
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public ICollection<Post> Posts { get; set; }
}

When updating the Tags in a Post entity, in the most common scenario, a new list of tag Ids are sent from the client-side, and the request payload will look like -

{
    "id": 123,
    "title": "An Awesome Post",
    "tags": [2, 7, 13]
}

Typically, you'd want to define a DTO to represent this request object, like -

public class PostUpdateDTO
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Title { get; set; }

    public List<int> Tags { get; set; }
}

Then, for the update operation itself, you can do something like -

[HttpPut]
public async Task Put([FromBody]PostUpdateDTO dto)
{
    // fetch existing Post including related Tags
    var post = await _DbCtx.Posts
        .Include(p => p.Tags)
        .FirstOrDefaultAsync(p => p.Id == dto.Post.Id);

    // remove all Tags from the existing list
    post.Tags.Clear();
    
    // add new Tags to the list whose Ids are sent by the client
    // but to identify them you need the list of all available tags
    var availableTags = await _DbCtx.Tags.ToListAsync();
    foreach (var id in dto.Tags)
    {
        post.Tags.Add(availableTags.First(p => p.Id == id));
    }
    
    // modify properties of Post if you need, like -
    // post.Title = dto.Title;

    await _DbCtx.SaveChangesAsync();
}

As you can see, this requires a trip to the database to fetch a list of all available Tag. If you don't like that and want to skip it, you can try the following approach -

[HttpPut]
public async Task Put([FromBody]PostUpdateDTO dto)
{
    // fetch existing Post including related Tags
    var post = await _DbCtx.Posts
        .Include(p => p.Tags)
        .FirstOrDefaultAsync(p => p.Id == dto.Post.Id);

    // remove Tags which are in the existing Tag list, but not 
    // in the new list sent by the client
    post.Tags.Where(tag => !dto.Tags.Any(id => id == tag.Id))
        .ToList().ForEach(tag => post.Tags.Remove(tag));

    // add Tags which are in the new list sent by the client, but 
    // not in the existing Tag list
    dto.Tags.Where(id => !post.Tags.Any(tag => tag.Id == id))
        .ToList().ForEach(id => post.Tags.Add(new Tag { Id = id }));

    // modify properties of Post if you need, like -
    // post.Title = dto.Title;

    await _DbCtx.SaveChangesAsync();
}

About that - property name followed by ID :
The kind of Id property you are referring to represents a foreign-key. Neither of these two entities contains a foreign-key property, because neither of them depends on the other. A foreign-key implies a parent/child or principal/dependent relationship. But when two entities are in many-to-many relation, they are independent of each other.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.