-4

I am developing an app for colleges, a part of the app is to set the weekly schedule of classes.

My parameters are Classroom number, Day of the week, and Time Slot.

So I have a range of classrooms, each classroom has a number.

in the Run-Time, the app generates some buttons based on how many classrooms I have on my database and sets classroom numbers on each Button.

What I want to do is to Label each Classroom button with "Red" BackColor if that certain classroom is full in the given Day of the Week and the given Time Slot.

I have accomplished what I wanted to do and my code works with no errors, but my only problem is now the performance.

Here is my Code:

private OleDbConnection Connection = new OleDbConnection();


private void SomeMethod(string Day, string Time)
    {
        int MaxIndex = 0;
        string str1 = "select Max([Row Index]) from Table";       
      OleDbCommand Command1 = new OleDbCommand(str1, Connection);
        Connection.Open();
        if (Command1.ExecuteScalar() == DBNull.Value)
            MaxIndex = 1;

        else
            MaxIndex = Convert.ToInt32(Command1.ExecuteScalar());
        Connection.Close();

        for (int i = 0; i < MaxIndex; i++)
        {
            string str = "select [classroom Number] from Table where [Day] = @ParamDay and [Time] = @ParamTime and [Row Index] = @ParamIndex";

            OleDbCommand Command = new OleDbCommand(str, Connection);
            Command.Parameters.Add("@ParamDay", Day);
            Command.Parameters.Add("@ParamTime", Time);
            Command.Parameters.Add("@ParamIndex", i + 1);

            Connection.Open();
            OleDbDataReader reader = Command.ExecuteReader();

            if (reader.Read())
            {
                foreach (Button btn in ButtonsPanel.Controls)
                {
                    if (btn.Text == reader["classroom Number"].ToString())
                    {
                        btn.BackColor = Color.Red;
                    }

                }
                Connection.Close();
            }
        }


    }
    

so this code takes about 13 seconds if I have 200 rows which I expect to have.

The question is... Is there anything I can do to my code so that these 13 seconds will reduce to at least 2-4 seconds?

For information: I have searched a lot on the internet, but could not find the solution to my issue here.

16
  • This is a bit open ended. You could move the I/O to a background thread to stop the UI from freezing (e.g. a worker thread) and optimize your database call. Maybe you have a missing index for example. – Kit Jan 29 at 1:16
  • 1
    Not in front of a computer to test, but you're opening and closing the database connection on each iteration, which is inefficient. Wrap the Connection initialisation in a using statement around the for loop and remove Connection.Close as that will be handled by the using statement – Hayden Jan 29 at 1:17
  • 1
    Also, remove the number of sql reads you need to do by potentially removing the for loop altogether, and use [Row Index] <= MaxIndex in your SQL query, and handle accordingly. This will only call the database once, not 200 times. – Hayden Jan 29 at 1:21
  • @Kit, I have thought of that. However, the user would still have to wait for a long time. The following actions of the user depend on the output of this code. – Ala Hirorî Jan 29 at 1:26
  • 1
    Retrieve the data once, and based on the row id in the data, act accordingly. You have the row id in the result set, which is now saved in memory. – Hayden Jan 29 at 1:34
0

You do not seem to need the for cycle at all. And the MaxIndex either. Just download the records for the time and mark buttons.

private void SomeMethod(string Day, string Time)
{
    HashSet<string> classNumbers = new HashSet<string>();

    string str = "select [classroom Number] from Table where [Day] = @ParamDay and [Time] = @ParamTime";
    using (OleDbCommand Command = new OleDbCommand(str, Connection))
    {
        Command.Parameters.Add("@ParamDay", Day);
        Command.Parameters.Add("@ParamTime", Time);                
        Connection.Open();
        using (OleDbDataReader reader = Command.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.CloseConnection))
        {
            while (reader.Read())
            {
                classNumbers.Add(reader["classroom Number"].ToString());
            }
        }
    }

    foreach (Button btn in ButtonsPanel.Controls)
    {
        if (classNumbers.Contains(btn.Text))
        {
            btn.BackColor = Color.Red;
        }
    }
}
3
  • You're not closing the connection. – Hayden Jan 29 at 3:36
  • @Hayden CommandBehavior.CloseConnection should handle that imho – Antonín Lejsek Jan 29 at 3:37
  • 1
    @Hayden the using implementation will close the connection automatically when it exists the scope. – Chris Schaller Jan 30 at 13:29
0

There are two things you can change to improve:

  1. Open and close the connection only once which can reduce the code running time.
  2. Fetch all the data you want to process in one query.

Check out the code below:

    private OleDbConnection Connection = new OleDbConnection();

    private void SomeMethod(string Day, string Time)
    {
        int MaxIndex = 0;
        string str1 = "select Max([Row Index]) from Table";       
        OleDbCommand Command1 = new OleDbCommand(str1, Connection);
        Connection.Open();
        if (Command1.ExecuteScalar() == DBNull.Value)
            MaxIndex = 1;
        else
            MaxIndex = Convert.ToInt32(Command1.ExecuteScalar());

        string str = "select [classroom Number] from Table where [Day] = @ParamDay and [Time] = @ParamTime and [Row Index] between 1 and @ParamIndex";

        OleDbCommand Command = new OleDbCommand(str, Connection);
        Command.Parameters.Add("@ParamDay", Day);
        Command.Parameters.Add("@ParamTime", Time);
        Command.Parameters.Add("@ParamIndex", MaxIndex);

        OleDbDataReader reader = Command.ExecuteReader();
        while (reader.Read())
        {
            foreach (Button btn in ButtonsPanel.Controls)
            {
                if (btn.Text == reader["classroom Number"].ToString())
                {
                    btn.BackColor = Color.Red;
                }
            }
        }

        Connection.Close();
    }
3
  • 1
    This code will only execute the first row, needs to be modified to use while (reader.Read()) – Hayden Jan 29 at 3:31
  • @Hayden Yes, thx. – Gellio Gao Jan 29 at 3:32
  • Thanks for your answer, I believe this code can also work in my case. – Ala Hirorî Jan 29 at 8:32
0

As per my comments, you only need to execute the query once and loop through the result set. This will have performance gains since you're now only accessing the IO once, as IO is typically very slow.

Here's an example (haven't tested):

private void SomeMethod(string day, string time)
{
    // Using statement helps to dispose any resources once done with the connection
    // connectionString can be any string that opens your database
    using (OleDbConnection connection = new OleDbConnection(connectionString))
    {
        // The query has removed the notion of index, it will just get all the data for that day and time
        string query = "SELECT [classroom Number] FROM Table WHERE [Day] = @ParamDay AND [Time] = @ParamTime";

        // Since OleDbCommand inherits from IDisposable, use a using statement
        using (OleDbCommand command = new OleDbCommand(query, connection))
        {
            // Notice how we don't use index anymore
            command.Parameters.Add("@ParamDay", day);
            command.Parameters.Add("@ParamTime", time);

            // Open connection here, don't need to close connection
            connection.Open();

            // Since OleDbDataReader inherits from IDisposable, use a using statement
            using (OleDbDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader())
            {
                // We're now looping through all the rows in the result set
                while (reader.Read())
                {
                    UpdateButtonColor(reader["classroom Number"].ToString());
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

private void UpdateButtonColor(string classroomNumber)
{
    foreach (Button btn in ButtonsPanel.Controls)
    {
        if (btn.Text == classroomNumber)
        {
            btn.BackColor = Color.Red;
        }
    }
}

Newer versions of C# allow the using statement to not require curly braces (which reduces nesting), which would look like:

private void SomeMethod(string day, string time)
{
    string query = "SELECT [classroom Number] FROM Table WHERE [Day] = @ParamDay AND [Time] = @ParamTime";
    using OleDbConnection connection = new OleDbConnection(connectionString);
    using OleDbCommand command = new OleDbCommand(query, connection);

    command.Parameters.Add("@ParamDay", day);
    command.Parameters.Add("@ParamTime", time);

    connection.Open();

    using OleDbDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader();
    
    while (reader.Read())
    {
        UpdateButtonColor(reader["classroom Number"].ToString());
    }
}

Documentation for this can be found here

3
  • Thanks for your Answer. I have implemented the first Answer's Code, But I am sure that yours will work as well. – Ala Hirorî Jan 29 at 8:30
  • Can you provide a documentation link to this new using syntax? This is not the correct syntax for the C# 8 using declaration. Please only post code examples in answers that will compile. – Chris Schaller Jan 30 at 13:39
  • @ChrisSchaller Thanks for pointing out, have removed round brackets around using statements. – Hayden Feb 1 at 0:52

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