36

I am having List object. How can I dispose of the list?

For example,

List<User> usersCollection =new List<User>();

User user1 = new User();
User user2 = new User()

userCollection.Add(user1);
userCollection.Add(user2);

If I set userCollection = null; what will happen?

foreach(User user in userCollection)
{
    user = null;
}

Which one is best?

4
  • 4
    Your code doesn't contain any dispose operations. Jul 6 '11 at 11:32
  • 2
    Dispose is for releasing unmanaged resources. If a list does not have any references to it, it will be released by the garbabe collector when appropriate. Jul 6 '11 at 11:34
  • 2
    @Paolo and prompt cleanup (of some implementation-specific kind) of some managed resources; but yes, unmanaged is more common Jul 6 '11 at 11:35
  • Note - the question is not asking about IDisposable specifically. The OP is just using the word dispose in the common sense. Feb 16 at 14:04

18 Answers 18

26

Best idea is to leave it to the garbage collector. Your foreach will do nothing since only the reference will be set to null not the element in the list. Setting the list to null could in fact cause garbage collection to occur later than it could have (see this post C#: should object variables be assigned to null?).

4
  • 2
    You linked the whole thread. Could you be more specific as to why garbage collection could occur later in this case? Or maybe even quote the relevant paragraph. Mar 18 '14 at 17:03
  • @Virtlink - the article states "you could actually wind up extending the time the object stays in memory because the CLR will believe that the object can't be collected until the end of the method because it sees a code reference to the object way down there. "
    – RadioSpace
    Jun 18 '14 at 23:37
  • 2
    It depends on the type of objects you store in your collection. If some of them implement IDisposable, the designer wanted to encourage you to call IDisposable.Dispose() instead of just letting the garbage collector do this for you. Usually this is because of scarce resources. For instance if only one object can use a camera at a time, then just assigning null won't free the camera immediately, while calling Dispose() would do this. Feb 17 '15 at 10:04
  • I think this answer is upvoted because people like the idea that the magic just happens. I'd agree setting local variables to null is undesirable and likely to create maintainability issues. I'd disagree when setting members to null in IDisposable. There's nothing to back up this claim that setting items to null could actually hamper the garbage collector. With my knowledge of the garbage collectors implementation such a claim seems totally counter intuitive to me.
    – Mick
    Jul 12 '19 at 1:27
23

I don't agree that you shouldn't do anything if you don't need the objects in the list anymore. If the objects implement the interface System.IDisposable then the designer of the object thought that the object holds scarce resources.

If you don't need the object anymore and just assign null to the object, then these scarce resources are not freed until the garbage collector finalizes the object. In the mean time you can't use this resource for something else.

Example: Consider you create a bitmap from a file, and decide you don't need neither the bitmap, nor the file anymore. Code could look like follows:

using System.Drawing;
Bitmap bmp = new Bitmap(fileName);
... // do something with bmp until not needed anymore
bmp = null;
File.Delete(fileName); // EXCEPTION, filename is still accessed by bmp.

The good method would be:

bmp.Dispose();
bmp = null;
File.Delete(fileName);

The same accounts for objects in a list, or any collection. All objects in the collection that are IDisposable should be disposed. Code should be like:

private void EmptySequence (IEnumerable sequence)
{   // throws away all elements in the sequence, if needed disposes them
    foreach (object o in sequence)
    {
        // uses modern pattern-matching
        if (disposableObject is IDisposable disposable)
        {
            disposable.Dispose();
        }
    }
}

Or if you want to create an IEnumerable extension function

public static void DisposeSequence<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    foreach (IDisposable disposableObject in source.OfType(System.IDisposable))
    {
        disposableObject.Dispose();
    };
}

All lists / dictionaries / read only lists / collections / etc can use these methods, because they all implement IEnumerable interface. You can even use it if not all items in the sequence implement System.IDisposable.

1
  • 1
    Damn @HaraldCoppoolse clean your eddit queue, I can't fix/improve on your extension method!! Anyways ill paste my improvement down here even if it will look really bad /// <summary> /// Iterates over the IEnmuerable and disposes each object /// </summary> public static void DisposeAll<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source) where T : IDisposable { foreach (var disposable in source) { disposable?.Dispose(); }; } Jun 12 '20 at 7:20
20

Firstly, you cannot "dispose" a list since it isn't IDisposable, and you can't force it to be collected since that isn't how C# works. Typically you would do nothing here. So when might we need to do anything?

  • If it is a method variable, and your method is going to exit in a moment, don't do anything: let the GC worry about it at some point after the method has existed.
  • If it is a field (instance variable), and the object is going to go out of scope in a moment, don't do anything: let the GC worry about it at some point after the instance is unreachable.

The only time you need to anything is if it is a field (or captured variable / iterator block variable / etc) and the instance (/delegate/iterator) is going to live a long while longer - then perhaps set the list field to null. Note, however, that if any other code still has a reference to the list then everything will still be reachable.

3
  • 3
    I don't agree that you shouldn't do anything if you don't need the objects in the list anymore. If the objects implement the System.IDisposable interface then the designer of the object thought that the object holds scarce resources. If you don't need it and just assign null to the object, then these scarce resources are not freed until the garbage collector finalizes the object. In the mean time you can't use this resource for something else. Nov 14 '13 at 13:59
  • 6
    @HaraldDutch there's a difference between "disposing the list" and "disposing the items in the list". The list normally has no right to assume that it is the sole owner of those objects. Nov 14 '13 at 14:46
  • I agree with @MarcGravell just because the list has objects, it does not imply it controls them. Jun 20 '18 at 18:36
13

Another idea for this post... If you were wanting to ensure that all members of a collection are properly disposed, you could use the following extension method:

public static void DisposeAll(this IEnumerable set) {
    foreach (Object obj in set) {
        IDisposable disp = obj as IDisposable;
        if (disp != null) { disp.Dispose(); }
    }
}

This looks through the collection for any member that implements IDisposableand disposing of it. From your executing code, you could clean up the list like this:

usersCollection.DisposeAll();
usersCollection.Clear();

This will ensure that all members get the chance to release resources and the resulting list is empty.

3

Best way is

userCollection= null;

Than GC will take care of rest.

3
  • 1
    I didn't vote, but certainly can explain. When is this "Bast" or even needed? Why would you clear a list before throwing away the reference? And why set the reference to null when it is getting out of scope?
    – Kobi
    Jul 6 '11 at 11:36
  • Sure. Don't need to loop yourself.
    – Zhen
    Jul 6 '11 at 11:36
  • If you don't dispose a disposable object, its resources are not disposed until the garbage collector finalise the object. If you create a bitmap from a file, and assign null to the bitmap, you can't delete the file because it is still used by the bitmap until it is disposed. Via the finalising of the GC. Therefore you should always Dispose all disposable objects, i stead of just assigning null Dec 5 '13 at 22:42
3

You haven't provided enough context. Scope is critical here.

I think the GC should be smart enough to deal with the memory allocated for users and the collection without having to set anything to null.

If the collection removes users that aren't necessary from the collection, and no other objects refer to them, they'll be GC'd without you having to provide any hints.

The GC will not clean up an object as long as there's a live reference to it. Eliminate all the references and it can do its job.

3

Yet another example of an extension method you can use to dispose a list of objects which implement the IDisposable interface. This one uses LINQ syntax.

    public static void Dispose(this IEnumerable collection)
    {
        foreach (var obj in collection.OfType<IDisposable>())
        {
            obj.Dispose();
        }
    }
3

There is a much better way when using System.Reactive.Disposeables:

Just initialize a new property of type CompositeDisposable and add the disposables to this collection. Then dispose just this one.

Here is a code example how to do it in an typical WPF/UWP ViewModel without indroducing any memory leaks:

public sealed MyViewModel : IDisposable
{
    // ie. using Serilog
    private ILogger Log => Log.ForContext<MyViewModel>();

    // ie. using ReactiveProperty 
    public ReactiveProperty<string> MyValue1 { get; } 
        = new ReactiveProperty<string>(string.Empty);

    public ReactiveProperty<string> MyValue1 { get; } 
        = new ReactiveProperty<string>(string.Empty);

    // this is basically an ICollection<IDisposable>
    private CompositeDisposable Subscriptions { get; } 
        = new CompositeDisposable();

    public MyViewModel()
    {
        var subscriptions = SubscribeToValues(); // Query
        Subscriptions.AddRange(subscriptions); // Command
    }

    private IEnumerable<IDisposable> SubscribeToValues()
    {
        yield return MyValue1.Subscribe(
            value => DoSomething1(value), 
            ex => Log.Error(ex, ex.Message), 
            () => OnCompleted()); 

        yield return MyValue2.Subscribe(
            value => DoSomething2(value),
            ex => Log.Error(ex, ex.Message), 
            () => OnCompleted()); 
    }

    private void DoSomething1(string value){ /* ... */ }
    private void DoSomething2(string value){ /* ... */ }
    private void OnCompleted() { /* ... */ }

implement IDisposable like this:

    #region IDisposable
    private ~MyViewModel()
    {
        Dispose(false);
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
    }

    private bool _isDisposed;
    private Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if(_isDisposed) return; // prevent double disposing

        // dispose values first, such that they call 
        // the onCompleted() delegate
        MyValue1.Dispose();
        MyValue2.Dispose();

        // dispose all subscriptions at once 
        Subscriptions.Dispose(); 

        // do not suppress finalizer when called from finalizer
        if(disposing) 
        {
            // do not call finalizer when already disposed
            GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
        }
        _isDisposed = true;
    }
    #endregion
}

and here is the extension class to get the .AddRange() method:

public static class CollectionExtensions
{
    public static void AddRange<T>(this ICollection<T> collection, IEnumerable<T> values)
    {
        foreach(var value in values)
        {
            collection.Add(value);
        }
    }
}

See also

  • BooleanDisposable lets you query if the object already got disposed
  • CancellationDisposable is like BooleanDisposable but with a cancellation token
  • ContextDisposable lets you dispose in a given thread context
  • MultipleAssignmentDisposable replaces one disposable with another without disposing the old disposable
  • SerialDisposable replaces the old disposalbe with another while disposing the old disposable
  • SingleAssignmentDisposable stores a disposable that cannot replaed with another disposable
2

And a generic implementation which will be worked (appear in List<T> method list) if the item implemented IDisposable

public static class LinqExtensions
{
    public static void DisposeItems<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source) where T : IDisposable
    {
        foreach(var item in source)
        {
            item.Dispose();
        }
    }
}

To be used in this way

if(list != null)
{
  list.DisposeItems();                
  list.Clear();
}
2

Many of these answers have something like...

public static void DisposeAll(this IEnumerable clx) {
    foreach (Object obj in clx) 
    {
        IDisposable disposeable = obj as IDisposable;
        if (disposeable != null) 
            disposeable.Dispose();
    }
}

usersCollection.DisposeAll();
usersCollection.Clear();

There's not a single answer which mention of why .Clear() is helpful. The answer is decoupling the items in the collection from the both the collection and each other.

The more you decouple on tear down of any object the greater the chance the garbage collector will do it's job in a timely manner. Often substantial .NET memory leaks result from large graphs of objects which are 99% unused which have one item that is still being referenced.

I think its good practice to...

  • unsubscribe from any events that the object is subscribed to
  • clear any collections held
  • and set all the members to null.

...in a class implementing IDisposable.

I'm not suggesting implementing IDisposable on everything and doing this, I'm saying if it so happens that you need to implement dispose you might as well do it. I only implement IDisposable when the object...

  • subscribe to events or
  • owns members which implement Dispose() such as a DB connection or a Bitmap or
  • has other unmanaged resources.

The only time I would only implement Dispose just to decouple an object would be when you know you have a memory leak and the analysis of a memory profiler suggested it might be helpful.

0

Why do you want to dispose the list? The GC will do it for you if there is no references to it anymore.

Garbage Collection: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0xy59wtx.aspx

3
  • You are right, but if your list contains IDisposable objects, then those objects are not Disposed() before the garbage collector finalizes them. If a designer of an object declares the object IDisposable he expresses that it holds some scarce resources that should be frees as soon as possible. Consider a bitmap that is created from file. Even if you assign null to the bitmap, you can't destroy the file before the garbage collector has finalized the bitmap. So you never know when you will be able to delete the file. Feb 25 '14 at 10:36
  • If your list contains IDisposable items, then you have the types wrong. Your list type should itself be an IDisposable. Apr 10 '16 at 14:09
  • The GC does nothing if the OP has a growing list of users. Mar 29 '18 at 22:48
0

As everyone has mentioned leave to GC, its the best option and don't force the GC. Setting the variable to null will mark the variable for the GC.

if your after more info: Best Practice for Forcing Garbage Collection in C#

3
  • 1
    According to the .NET team, setting a variable to null can actually result in it living longer than is necessary. The runtime is very intelligent, and doesn't need you to set a variable to null for it to determine if it can cleanup that memory. The current implementation of the GC actually looks for references to the variable - once there is no further code which touches that variable, the GC will reclaim that memory when there is memory pressue or spare cycles. Setting it to null at the end of a method can prolong its life, because you're creating an additional usage of the variable.
    – RyanR
    Jul 6 '11 at 22:44
  • If you don't dispose the object, it will eventually be disposed by the garbage collector. This will free up scarce resources. The problem is that you don't know when this happens, and thus don't know when the resource is free. Example bitmap that is loaded from file. If you don't dispose the bitmap you don't know when you can delete the file. Just assigning null to it doesn't release the lock on the file. If you call dispose, you are sure that the file can be deleted immediately Dec 5 '13 at 22:47
  • why not force the gc?
    – Sharky
    Jan 29 '16 at 11:55
0

One other idea is to use brackets that include the scope of your variable that you wish to keep.

for example.

void Function()
{
    ... some code here ....

    {   // inside this bracket the usersCollection is alive
        // at the end of the bracet the garbage collector can take care of it

        List<User> usersCollection =new List<User>();

        User user1 = new User();
        User user2 = new User()

        userCollection.Add(user1);
        userCollection.Add(user2);

        foreach(User user in userCollection)
        {

        }
    }

    ... other code here ....
}
2
  • Does it really make any difference? Isn't the GC intelligent enough to know that usersCollection is no longer used after the foreach loop? In debug mode however, it seems not not be garbage collected. May 26 '15 at 16:30
  • @ErwinMayer this is a "trick" from c/c++. Its probably did not matter in normal situations with fast and few code...
    – Aristos
    May 28 '15 at 9:56
0

I've come across scenarios where, when large amounts of data are being processed, the GC doesn't clean-up until after the collection has gone out of scope (technically the GC does its collection when it sees fit and this may not be when then collection goes out of scope).

In these (rare) scenarios, I've used the following class:

public class DisposableList<T> : List<T>, IDisposable
{
    public void Dispose()
    {
    }
}

You can then use it just like a normal List, e.g.

var myList = new DisposableList<MyObject>();

Then call the Dispose method when you're finished:

myList.Dispose();

Or, alternatively, declare it in a using statement:

using (var myList = new DisposableList<MyObject>())
{
    ...
}

This then causes the GC to do its collection immediately once the DisposableList is out of scope or disposed.

2
  • The only problem with this is you haven't overridden the indexer so it is possible to store objects and not have them disposed when the List is disposed. Jun 18 '14 at 13:00
  • I had to use this code on a Windows service that was processing large amounts of data in chunks. I profiled the service and it did dispose of the objects contained in the list.I don't think that the indexer is relevant here?
    – user2746082
    Aug 7 '15 at 16:16
0

I see many answers calling Dispose of an object within a foreach loop over a collection. Since Dispose just marks the object to be removed the next time the garbage collector runs, it will work ok. In theory however, disposing an item could modify the collection and breaking the foreach, so it would be more robust to first collect those disposable objects, clear the original list, and calling the dispose within a for or while loop starting from the end and removing the object in each iteration, e.g. calling the following method:

    public static void DisposeItemsInList<T>(this IList<T> list) where T : IDisposable
    {
        DeleteItemsInList(list, item => item.Dispose());
    }

    public static void DeleteItemsInList<T>(this ICollection<T> list, Action<T> delete)
    {
        if (list is IList && !((IList)list).IsFixedSize)
        {
            while (list.Count > 0)
            {
                T last = list.Last();
                list.Remove(last);
                delete?.Invoke(last);
            }
        }
        else
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < list.Count; i++)
            {
                delete?.Invoke(list.ElementAt(i));
            }
        }
    }

I am actually using the DeleteItemsInList for other purposes, e.g. to delete files: DeleteItemsInList(File.Delete) )

As those have stated, in general case, it should not be necessary to dispose such a list. A case where I do dispose item in a list is working with Stream, I collect a few steams, transform the data from them, and then dispose these stream and keep only my transformed objects for further processing.

0

I hope you've encountered an out of memory exception if you are asking this question, if not you should create a test to cause an out of memory exception.

Assuming you actually have memory issues, you need to identify what in the User object is consuming all of your memory. Set the properties in the User object to null which are consuming the most memory.

User.BigData = null;

Then you can keep your list of users and let the garbage collector cleanup the properties that are consuming all of your memory.

0

If your item in list is un-managed object then you can call Dispose() on every object by iterating it.

foreach(User user in userCollection)
{
user.Dispose();
}

If the list object is managed object then you need not do anything. GC will take care.

0

This might help someone :

public class DisposableList<T> : List<T>, IDisposable where T : IDisposable
{
    public void Dispose()
    {
        foreach (var item in this)
            item?.Dispose();
    }
}

or simpler :

public class DisposableList : List<IDisposable>, IDisposable
{
    public void Dispose()
    {
        foreach (var item in this)
            item?.Dispose();
    }
}

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