0

I'm not sure if this type of questions get answered here but here it goes anyway.

# moving hour hand
def moveHourHand():
   currentHourInternal = datetime.datetime.now().hour
   degree = (currentHourInternal - 15) * -30
   currentMinuteInternal = datetime.datetime.now().minute
   degree = degree + -0.5 * currentMinuteInternal
   hourHand.setheading(degree)
   wn.ontimer(moveHourHand, 60000)


# moving minute hand
def moveMinuteHand():
    currentMinuteInternal = datetime.datetime.now().minute
    degree = (currentMinuteInternal - 15) * -6
    currentSecondInternal = datetime.datetime.now().second
    degree = degree + (-currentSecondInternal * 0.1)
    minuteHand.setheading(degree)
    wn.ontimer(moveMinuteHand, 1000)

# moving second hand
def moveSecondHand():
    currentSecondInternal = datetime.datetime.now().second
    degree = (currentSecondInternal - 15) * -6
    secondHand.setheading(degree)
    wn.ontimer(moveSecondHand, 1000)

This is a part of a analog clock built by turtle in python. (not mine. This is the source) This part is creating functions for the movement of hands.

I'm creating a clock of my own and I'm searching for different ways to get the hands to move. This one seems to be working the best but I can't really understand what's exactly going on. I know it's getting a value from datetime library but everything after that is confusing. especially the part with 'degree'. and where is '15' coming from.

So I'd appreciate it if someone can explain it in a way that I can understand.

1 Answer 1

0
# moving hour hand
def moveHourHand():
   currentHourInternal = datetime.datetime.now().hour #Gets current local hour
   degree = (currentHourInternal - 15) * -30 #Hour degree, look below
   currentMinuteInternal = datetime.datetime.now().minute #Gets minutes for moving the hour hand between hours 
   degree = degree + -0.5 * currentMinuteInternal #Minute degree, also, look below
   hourHand.setheading(degree) #This might send the degree to the function that move the hand
   wn.ontimer(moveHourHand, 60000) #Im not sure about this one but i think that tells that function what and when to be called again, in milli seconds (60000ms = 60s = 1m)

Hour degree:

-In a circle, normally, 0 degrees is the most right point, but in a clock 0 degrees is the top point, as seen in the image. To compesate that 15 are romoved. Between each hour has 30 degrees (360 degrees in a circle / 12 hours). Its negative because adding positive degrees goes counter clock ways.

circle with degreesclock

e.g. (hour - 15) * -30
12 hours -> (12 - 15) * -30 = 90 degrees. Look the images, 90 degrees corresponds to 12h
3 hours -> (3 - 15) * -30 = 360 degrees
6 hours -> (6 - 15) * -30 = 270 degrees
9 hours -> (9 - 15) * -30 = 180 degrees

Minute degree:

Works similar to the hour, multiplies by -0.5 because each hour has 30 degrees and 60 minutes, do the math, (30 degrees / 60 minutes) 1/2 degrees by minute. The nagative as before is because positive degrees go counter clock ways, so negative goes clock ways. Then its added to the total degrees for moving the hour hand between the numbers.

e.g. (minutes * -0.5)
0 minutes:  0 degrees
15 minutes: -7.5 degrees
30 minutes: -15 degrees
45 minutes: -22.5 degrees
1
  • Thanks a lot. I actually still don't understand where that 15 even came from haha, But now that you've explained what it's supposed to be doing I replaced that part with another calculation that does the same function and I understand it better so your explanation helped a lot. (I replaced it with ((currentHour * -30) - 270) so every hour goes ahead three quarters of the circle and places in their correct place)
    – Parnes
    Jan 31, 2021 at 7:40

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.