1

In C++ I can access the value pointed to by an iterator it, as well as surrounding ones (which is not always safe, but that's off topic here), using dereference: std::cout << "prev: " << *(it-1) << ", here: " << *it << ", next: " << *(it+1) << std::endl;

How do I do the same in Python?

Using next() I can get the current value, but that also increments the iterator (similar to C++ *it++).

Complete code example below:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
int main() 
{
    std::vector<int> myvector{ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
    for (auto it = myvector.begin()+1; it != myvector.end()-1; ++it) {
        std::cout << "prev: " << *(it-1) << ", here: " << *it << ", next: " << *(it+1) << std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
1
  • Well if you have a vector or array that's easy. But a Python iterator can apply any logic to get the next element. It might even depend on runtime circumstances and not be the same the time you'd check and the time you'd actually consume it. Jan 30, 2021 at 16:35

2 Answers 2

0

You can't do it, but there are some workaround using itertools, e.g.

>>> from itertools import tee
>>> it = iter([1,2,3])
>>> it, it2 = tee(it)
>>> next(it2)
1
>>> list(it)
[1, 2, 3]

Or rebuilding the iterator:

>>> from itertools import chain
>>> it = iter([1,2,3])
>>> first = next(it)
>>> first
1
>>> list(chain([first], it))
[1, 2, 3]
0

You can use zip for shifting here:

data = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
for prev, here, nxt in zip(data, data[1:], data[2:]):
    print(f"prev: {prev}, here: {here}, next: {nxt}")

It will print:

prev: 1, here: 2, next: 3
prev: 2, here: 3, next: 4
prev: 3, here: 4, next: 5
1
  • Note that next is builtin object, you shouldn't name your vars like it
    – orion_tvv
    Aug 8 at 20:19

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