5

If I have a value templated class

template<int... values>
class A {};

Can I specialize it "easely" (without template recursion) for all sequences with a undetermined-length sequence of trailing 0's ?

// Pseudo code
template<int... values>
class A<values..., 0...> {};

Examples that should use the specialized version (in fact that should match every sequence eventually with zero trailing 0's):

A<1, 0>{}; // use overloaded version with overloaded template values = <1>
A<1, 1>{}; // use with values=<1, 1>
A<1, 2, 3, 0, 0, 0>{}; // use with template values = <1, 2, 3>
A<1, 2, 3>{}; // use with values=<1, 2, 3>
9
  • When you say "a repeated sequence of 0's", do you mean that the last and second-last values are both 0?
    – Brian Bi
    Feb 1, 2021 at 16:39
  • I suppose "repeated sequence of 0's" means at least one trailing 0 (note that ... is: none or more) Feb 1, 2021 at 16:39
  • Yes, I mean "trailing 0's of undetermined length >= 1"
    – rafoo
    Feb 1, 2021 at 16:40
  • 2
    But a "repeated sequence of 0's" of lenght ">=1" matches every sequence ending with a zero.
    – max66
    Feb 1, 2021 at 16:43
  • Apologize, in fact, it's not >= 1, I mean it can also be none zeros.
    – rafoo
    Feb 1, 2021 at 16:47

3 Answers 3

4

You can use constexpr functions to strip the trailing zeros from the end of the parameter pack:

template<int... values>
class A_impl {};

template<typename Arr>
constexpr auto num_trailing_zeros(Arr const& arr) {
    int count = 0;

    for (int i = arr.size() - 1; i >= 0; --i) {
        if (arr[i] != 0) return count;
        ++count;
    }

    return count;
}

// Not `constexpr` because we aren't providing a definition;
// we only care about the type.
// Marking it `constexpr` produces compilation warnings.
template<auto const& arr, std::size_t... Is>
auto A_from_arr(std::index_sequence<Is...>) -> A_impl<arr[Is]...>;

// Not `constexpr` because we need the `static constexpr` `arr` variable so
// that we can pass it as a reference argument.
// `static`s aren't allowed inside `constexpr` functions.
// This is fine, because we only care about the type.
template<int... values>
auto A_without_trailing_zeros() {
    static constexpr auto arr = std::array { values... };
    constexpr auto num_trailing = num_trailing_zeros(arr);
    return A_from_arr<arr>(std::make_index_sequence<sizeof...(values) - num_trailing>{});
}

template<int... values>
using A = decltype(A_without_trailing_zeros<values...>());

Demo

1
  • 1
    Nice. static_assert(std::is_same_v<decltype(A<1, 2, 3>{}), decltype(A<1, 2, 3, 0, 0, 0>{})>); passes.
    – Ted Lyngmo
    Feb 1, 2021 at 18:45
2

Not sure about what do you exactly want... and surely you can't obtain what do you want in a simple way with a simple class A... but if you accept to add a level of indirection... I mean: a struct/class A<1, 2, 3, 0, 0, 0> that inherit from B<1, 2, 3>...

We need something that strip the trailing zero from an integer sequence.

Maybe there are simpler methods but I imagine a custom type traits as follows

template <typename, typename, int...>
struct szh;

// non zero element case    
template <int ... As, int ... Bs, int C, int ... Ds>
struct szh<std::integer_sequence<int, As...>,
           std::integer_sequence<int, Bs...>,
           C, Ds...>
 : public szh<std::integer_sequence<int, As..., Bs..., C>,
              std::integer_sequence<int>,
              Ds...>
 { };

// zero element case
template <int ... As, int ... Bs, int ... Ds>
struct szh<std::integer_sequence<int, As...>,
           std::integer_sequence<int, Bs...>,
           0, Ds...>
 : public szh<std::integer_sequence<int, As...>,
              std::integer_sequence<int, Bs..., 0>,
              Ds...>
 { };

// ground case
template <int ... As, int ... Bs>
struct szh<std::integer_sequence<int, As...>,
           std::integer_sequence<int, Bs...>>
 { using type = std::integer_sequence<int, As...>; };

template <int ... Is>
using strip_trailing_zeros
   = typename szh<std::integer_sequence<int>,
                  std::integer_sequence<int>,
                  Is...>::type;

I've made it generic because I think it's better make complicated code reusable. But if the final type is B<As...> instead of std::integer_sequence<int, As...>, the following code can be simplified a little but strip_trailing_zeros can't be re-used.

Now a simple class B (observe that the constructor prints the Is...)

template <int ... Is>
struct B
 { B () { ((std::cout << Is), ...); std::cout << '\n'; } };

and a converter (only declared) from std::integer_sequenc<int, Is...> to B<int...>

template <int ... Is>
B<Is...> foo (std::integer_sequence<int, Is...>);

so A become

template <int ... Is>
struct A : public decltype(foo(strip_trailing_zeros<Is...>{}))
 { };

The following is a full compiling example

#include <iostream>
#include <utility>

template <typename, typename, int...>
struct szh;

template <int ... As, int ... Bs, int C, int ... Ds>
struct szh<std::integer_sequence<int, As...>,
           std::integer_sequence<int, Bs...>,
           C, Ds...>
 : public szh<std::integer_sequence<int, As..., Bs..., C>,
              std::integer_sequence<int>,
              Ds...>
 { };

template <int ... As, int ... Bs, int ... Ds>
struct szh<std::integer_sequence<int, As...>,
           std::integer_sequence<int, Bs...>,
           0, Ds...>
 : public szh<std::integer_sequence<int, As...>,
              std::integer_sequence<int, Bs..., 0>,
              Ds...>
 { };

template <int ... As, int ... Bs>
struct szh<std::integer_sequence<int, As...>,
           std::integer_sequence<int, Bs...>>
 { using type = std::integer_sequence<int, As...>; };

template <int ... Is>
using strip_trailing_zeros
   = typename szh<std::integer_sequence<int>,
                  std::integer_sequence<int>,
                  Is...>::type;

template <int ... Is>
struct B
 { B () { ((std::cout << Is), ...); std::cout << '\n'; } };

template <int ... Is>
B<Is...> foo (std::integer_sequence<int, Is...>);

template <int ... Is>
struct A : public decltype(foo(strip_trailing_zeros<Is...>{}))
 { };

int main()
 {
   A<1, 0>{}; // print "1" (inherit from B<1>)
   A<1, 1>{}; // print "1, 1" (inherit from B<1, 1>)
   A<1, 2, 3, 0, 0, 0>{}; // print "1, 2, 3" (inherit from B<1, 2, 3>)
   A<1, 2, 3>{}; // // print "1, 2, 3" (inherit from B<1, 2, 3>)
 }
3
  • And this is why we have constexpr. As far as I can tell, your code has O(n) recursion depth, which means O(n^2) total symbol length, and will simply explode if the list is long. Avoiding O(n) length requires some annoying tricks that make the above messy code look simple (basically you can turn a list into a binary tree without more than O(lg n) recursive depth, then operate on that tree instead of the list) Feb 1, 2021 at 19:54
  • @Yakk-AdamNevraumont - Ehmmm... sorry but I don't see the O(lg n) solution. Based over template classes or over a constexpr function (as the Justin one)? Can you see show it in an (another) answer?
    – max66
    Feb 1, 2021 at 20:31
  • log depth; linear steps. split<n,list>::left=concat<split<n/2,list>::left, split<n-n/2, split<n/2,list>::right>::left> is the tricky part. Feb 1, 2021 at 21:33
1

No, after-pack-deduction pattern matching does not work in C++.

Nothing is ever successfully matched after a pack is deduced. Ever.

A pattern-match can occur after a pack is expanded, but the pack cannot deduce types and then go on to match anything.

A seperate list is the best you can do.

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