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I am curious about the historical reason for the divergence in syntax between Perl regex backreferences and everyone else's (C++, grep, emacs, literally every other usage I've seen).

Perl uses \g1 for a group backreference. Everyone else uses a syntax which seems much cleaner, just \1.

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  • I think it is so relative and named backreferences like \g{-1} and \g{name} are less confusing. If you just used \{-1} or \{name} would that be more confusing? Feb 2, 2021 at 21:25
  • @Jerry Jeremiah, \{ already has a meaning, so that's a no-go. Escapes sequences must match /^\\\w/
    – ikegami
    Feb 2, 2021 at 21:59
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    Re "I am curious about the historical reason for the divergence in syntax between Perl regex backreferences and everyone else's", If there was a divergeance, you would have to ask them cause most regex languages are based on Perl's :D
    – ikegami
    Feb 2, 2021 at 22:04
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    First, it's not "everyone else" -- for example, python has \g<N> and .NET has \k{N}). Anyway, they (the "everyone else") mostly pick(ed) up features, or really all of regex, from Perl and some are now just a little behind. Most do have \k{name}, as they have to since they support capturing by name.
    – zdim
    Feb 3, 2021 at 1:07
  • This should not have been closed. The question has an objective answer.
    – ikegami
    Feb 5, 2021 at 23:48

1 Answer 1

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Actually, Perl does accept \1.

/^(.)\1\z/s    # Equiv* to length($_) == 2 && substr($_, 0, 1) eq substr($_, 1, 1)

\g is a far more recent and far more flexible addition.

\1             # References the text captured by the nth capture
\g{1}   \g1    # References the text captured by the nth capture
\g{-1}  \g-1   # References the text captured by the nth capture before the \g
\g{name}       # References the text captured by (?<name>...)
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