78

Can lambdas be defined as data members?

For example, would it be possible to rewrite the code sample below using a lambda instead of a function object?

struct Foo {
    std::function<void()> bar;
};

The reason I wonder is because the following lambdas can be passed as arguments:

template<typename Lambda>
void call_lambda(Lambda lambda) // what is the exact type here?
{ 
    lambda();
}

int test_foo() {
    call_lambda([] { std::cout << "lambda calling" << std::endl; });
}

I've figured that if a lambda can be passed as a function argument, then maybe they can also be stored as a data member.

After more tinkering I found that this works (but it's kind of pointless):

auto say_hello = [] { std::cout << "Hello"; };

struct Foo {
    using Bar = decltype(say_hello);
    Bar bar;
    Foo() : bar(say_hello) {}
};
10
  • 2
    The type name of a lambda is unknown to you, and generated by the compiler (one per lambda function). The std::function template was introduced precisely as a type eraser for this kind of situations. Jul 6, 2011 at 19:39
  • 1
    Did you try it? why are you asking us to do it for you? if it errored then come here and post the error too.
    – Daniel
    Jul 6, 2011 at 19:39
  • 1
    Lambdas are function objects! Yes, you can make bar a lambda.
    – Kerrek SB
    Jul 6, 2011 at 19:39
  • 1
    Some lambdas can also become function pointers. Jul 6, 2011 at 19:47
  • 2
    @Dani: Ehm, the standard group itself finished everything, made a FDIS (Final Draft International Standard) in March. All that's left is a sign from ISO.
    – Xeo
    Jul 6, 2011 at 19:49

6 Answers 6

60

A lambda just makes a function object, so, yes, you can initialize a function member with a lambda. Here is an example:

#include <functional>
#include <cmath>

struct Example {

  Example() {
    lambda = [](double x) { return int(std::round(x)); };
  };

  std::function<int(double)> lambda;

};
6
  • 6
    Why not use the initializer list??
    – Kerrek SB
    Jul 6, 2011 at 21:25
  • 8
    I didn't put the function in the initializer list in my example on purpose, because I figured that chances are if you're really doing something like the above in a real situation, your lambda would actually be doing captures or something more complex where it wouldn't make sense in the initializer list. But of course you could make this Example() : lambda([](double x) { return int(std::round(x)); }) {} if you want. =)
    – wjl
    Dec 27, 2013 at 4:04
  • 1
    Because lambda expressions yield callable objects, closures can be stored in std::function objects. Lambdas don't 'just make' function objects.
    – sungiant
    Dec 12, 2016 at 15:24
  • 1
    @sungiant Well, if you want to argue definitions, yes lambda's do 'just make' function objects -- but you are correct that they do not 'just make' std::function objects. Every lambda -- even those defined exactly the same way -- is a function object of a distinct class. Fortunately, these can be used transparently and polymorphically with type erasure wrappers like std::function. =)
    – wjl
    Dec 13, 2016 at 20:17
  • 2
    Lambdas do not make std::function<...> objects. That said, they are implicitly convertible to one. There are several important distinctions. First, a lambda does not heap allocate, but std::function does. Lambdas without any captures are actually normal function types (e.g. void (&)(int, char)). Dec 21, 2020 at 14:30
32

Templates make it possible without type erasure, but that's it:

template<typename T>
struct foo {
    T t;
};

template<typename T>
foo<typename std::decay<T>::type>
make_foo(T&& t)
{
    return { std::forward<T>(t) };
}

// ...
auto f = make_foo([] { return 42; });

Repeating the arguments that everyone has already exposed: []{} is not a type, so you can't use it as e.g. a template parameter like you're trying. Using decltype is also iffy because every instance of a lambda expression is a notation for a separate closure object with a unique type. (e.g. the type of f above is not foo<decltype([] { return 42; })>.)

5
  • except that you cannot have a member variable of function type without knowing its type, ie. without type erasure. Jul 6, 2011 at 22:15
  • @Alexandre This is not about std::function, assuming you meant that. If you didn't, I don't understand.
    – Luc Danton
    Jul 6, 2011 at 22:26
  • not necessarily. I just mean that you cannot declare member variables of type foo<T> without knowing T. To do this, you have to erase T somehow. This limits what you can do with your approach (which is good by the way, I learnt about std::decay and it reminded me to use initializer lists when I can). Jul 6, 2011 at 22:29
  • 1
    @Alexandre That's what the 'without type erasure' means at the top.
    – Luc Danton
    Jul 6, 2011 at 22:33
  • 2
    In my case, it's important that all functions in the array have the same argument and return types, so vanilla std::function works just fine. I am still wondering about the overhead
    – Miles
    Jan 24, 2014 at 21:24
21

A bit late, but I have not seen this answer anywhere here. If the lambda has no capture arguments, then it can be implicitly cast to a pointer to a function with the same arguments and return types.

For example, the following program compiles fine and does what you would expect:

struct a {
    int (*func)(int, int);
};

int main()
{
    a var;
    var.func = [](int a, int b) { return a+b; };
}

Of course, one of the main advantages of lambdas is the capture clause, and once you add that, then that trick will simply not work. Use std::function or a template, as answered above.

10
#include <functional>

struct Foo {
    std::function<void()> bar;
};

void hello(const std::string & name) {
    std::cout << "Hello " << name << "!" << std::endl;
}

int test_foo() {
    Foo f;
    f.bar = std::bind(hello, "John");

    // Alternatively: 
    f.bar = []() { hello("John"); };
    f.bar();
}
5

As long as lambda is constant (without closures), you can do something like this:

#include <iostream>

template<auto function>
struct Foo
{
    decltype(function) bar = function;
};

void call_lambda(auto&& lambda)
{
    lambda();
}

int main()
{
    Foo<[](){ std::cout << "Hello"; }> foo;
    foo.bar();
    call_lambda(foo.bar);
}

https://godbolt.org/z/W5K1rexv3

Or we can apply deduction guides to make it work for all lambdas:

#include <iostream>

template<typename T>
struct Foo 
{
    T bar;
};

template<typename T>
Foo(T) -> Foo<std::decay_t<T>>;

void call_lambda(auto&& lambda)
{
    lambda();
}

int main()
{
    std::string hello = "Hello";
    Foo foo([&](){ std::cout << hello; });
    foo.bar();
    call_lambda(foo.bar);
}

https://godbolt.org/z/cenrzTbz4

3

"if a lambda can be passed as a function argument then maybe also as a member variable"

The first is a yes, you can use template argument deduction or "auto" to do so. The second is probably no, since you need to know the type at declaration point and neither of the previous two tricks can be used for that.

One that may work, but for which I don't know whether it will, is using decltype.

1
  • decltype wouldn't work because every occurrence of a lambda expression is of a different type and they're not convertible between them. But apparently you can't even use lambdas in decltype. Jul 6, 2011 at 20:02

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