242

I'm trying to understand how recreating the node_modules directory for deployment works.

We're using npm ci instead of npm install to ensure a clean slate during deployment. However, when we run it without any flags, we get the following error:

Fix the upstream dependency conflict, or retry this command with --force, or --legacy-peer-deps to accept an incorrect (and potentially broken) dependency resolution.

The documentation for npm install for --force is as follows (there are no flags on npm ci's page):

The -f or --force argument will force npm to fetch remote resources even if a local copy exists on disk.

Meanwhile, the documentation for --legacy-peer-deps says:

--legacy-peer-deps: ignore all peerDependencies when installing, in the style of npm version 4 through version 6.

It seems that both flags will let npm ci generate the node_modules directory without any issues, but I am still unclear about the differences between the two.

From what I understand, --force sounds like it will be on a last-dependency-downloaded-wins basis and will overwrite any previously downloaded dependencies. Meanwhile, --legacy-peer-deps sounds like it will always skip peer dependencies (whatever those are) during installation even if there are no issues.

What are the differences between the two flags, and when should we use them?

5 Answers 5

185

In the new version of npm (v7), by default, npm install will fail when it encounters conflicting peerDependencies. It was not like that before.

Take a look here for more info about peer dependencies in npm v7.

The differences between the two are below -

  • --legacy-peer-deps: ignore all peerDependencies when installing, in the style of npm version 4 through version 6.

  • --strict-peer-deps: fail and abort the install process for any conflicting peerDependencies when encountered. By default, npm will only crash for peerDependencies conflicts caused by the direct dependencies of the root project.

  • --force: will force npm to fetch remote resources even if a local copy exists on disk.

3
  • 46
    and what of --force per OP? Are there performance benefits with one over the other or overall deduped packages, etc?
    – jflay
    Commented Feb 9, 2021 at 22:15
  • 1
    --force still pins many dependency versions while --legacy-peer-deps ignore peer dependencies entirely. See example from @HongboMiao
    – Ogglas
    Commented Jun 14, 2022 at 9:04
  • 13
    The question is about the when to use what but I don't see that in the answer. Can you elaborate more about what are the differences between the 2?
    – Cupid Chan
    Commented Jun 17, 2022 at 10:29
91

In the article npm 7 is now generally available!,

You have the option to retry with --force to bypass the conflict or --legacy-peer-deps command to ignore peer dependencies entirely (this behavior is similar to versions 4-6).

I agree this sentence is not really clear, but "ignore peer dependencies entirely" does not sound good. Let's use a real example:

Here is a peer dependency error I met when I npm install:

npm ERR! code ERESOLVE
npm ERR! ERESOLVE unable to resolve dependency tree
npm ERR!
npm ERR! While resolving: mobile@undefined
npm ERR! Found: [email protected]
npm ERR! node_modules/react
npm ERR!   react@"17.0.1" from the root project
npm ERR!   peer react@">=16.0.0" from @testing-library/[email protected]
npm ERR!   node_modules/@testing-library/react-native
npm ERR!     dev @testing-library/react-native@"7.2.0" from the root project
npm ERR!
npm ERR! Could not resolve dependency:
npm ERR! peer react@"16.13.1" from [email protected]
npm ERR! node_modules/react-native
npm ERR!   react-native@"https://github.com/expo/react-native/archive/sdk-39.0.4.tar.gz" from the root project
npm ERR!   peer react-native@">=0.59" from @testing-library/[email protected]
npm ERR!   node_modules/@testing-library/react-native
npm ERR!     dev @testing-library/react-native@"7.2.0" from the root project
npm ERR!
npm ERR! Fix the upstream dependency conflict, or retry
npm ERR! this command with --force, or --legacy-peer-deps
npm ERR! to accept an incorrect (and potentially broken) dependency resolution.
npm ERR!
npm ERR! See /Users/me/.npm/eresolve-report.txt for a full report.

npm ERR! A complete log of this run can be found in:
npm ERR!     /Users/me/.npm/_logs/2021-03-13T00_10_33_813Z-debug.log
npm ERR! code 1
npm ERR! path /Users/me/my-app
npm ERR! command failed
npm ERR! command sh -c sh ./bin/setup.sh

npm ERR! A complete log of this run can be found in:
npm ERR!     /Users/me/.npm/_logs/2021-03-13T00_10_33_860Z-debug.log

Below is the package-lock.json difference between --legacy-peer-deps and --force.

  1. If I run npm install --legacy-peer-deps, it adds this in my package-lock.json:
"node_modules/@unimodules/react-native-adapter": {
  "version": "5.7.0",
  "resolved": "https://registry.npmjs.org/@unimodules/react-native-adapter/-/react-native-adapter-5.7.0.tgz",
  "integrity": "sha512-L557/+sc8ZKJVgo1734HF1QNCxrt/fpqdmdNgySJT+kErux/AJNfPq3flsK0fyJduVmniTutYIMyW48cFoPKDA==",
  "dependencies": {
    "invariant": "^2.2.4",
    "lodash": "^4.5.0"
  },
  "peerDependencies": {
    "react-native": "*",
    "react-native-web": "~0.13.7"
  }
},

...

"@unimodules/react-native-adapter": {
  "version": "5.7.0",
  "resolved": "https://registry.npmjs.org/@unimodules/react-native-adapter/-/react-native-adapter-5.7.0.tgz",
  "integrity": "sha512-L557/+sc8ZKJVgo1734HF1QNCxrt/fpqdmdNgySJT+kErux/AJNfPq3flsK0fyJduVmniTutYIMyW48cFoPKDA==",
  "requires": {
    "invariant": "^2.2.4",
    "lodash": "^4.5.0"
  }
},
  1. If I use npm install --force, instead, it adds
"node_modules/expo/node_modules/@unimodules/react-native-adapter": {
  "version": "5.7.0",
  "resolved": "https://registry.npmjs.org/@unimodules/react-native-adapter/-/react-native-adapter-5.7.0.tgz",
  "integrity": "sha512-L557/+sc8ZKJVgo1734HF1QNCxrt/fpqdmdNgySJT+kErux/AJNfPq3flsK0fyJduVmniTutYIMyW48cFoPKDA==",
  "dependencies": {
    "invariant": "^2.2.4",
    "lodash": "^4.5.0"
  },
  "peerDependencies": {
    "react-native": "*",
    "react-native-web": "~0.13.7"
  }
},
"node_modules/expo/node_modules/inline-style-prefixer": {
  "version": "5.1.2",
  "resolved": "https://registry.npmjs.org/inline-style-prefixer/-/inline-style-prefixer-5.1.2.tgz",
  "integrity": "sha512-PYUF+94gDfhy+LsQxM0g3d6Hge4l1pAqOSOiZuHWzMvQEGsbRQ/ck2WioLqrY2ZkHyPgVUXxn+hrkF7D6QUGbA==",
  "peer": true,
  "dependencies": {
    "css-in-js-utils": "^2.0.0"
  }
},
"node_modules/expo/node_modules/react-native-web": {
  "version": "0.13.18",
  "resolved": "https://registry.npmjs.org/react-native-web/-/react-native-web-0.13.18.tgz",
  "integrity": "sha512-WR/0ECAmwLQ2+2cL2Ur+0/swXFAtcSM0URoADJmG6D4MnY+wGc91JO8LoOTlgY0USBOY+qG/beRrjFa+RAuOiA==",
  "peer": true,
  "dependencies": {
    "array-find-index": "^1.0.2",
    "create-react-class": "^15.6.2",
    "deep-assign": "^3.0.0",
    "fbjs": "^1.0.0",
    "hyphenate-style-name": "^1.0.3",
    "inline-style-prefixer": "^5.1.0",
    "normalize-css-color": "^1.0.2",
    "prop-types": "^15.6.0",
    "react-timer-mixin": "^0.13.4"
  },
  "peerDependencies": {
    "react": ">=16.5.1",
    "react-dom": ">=16.5.1"
  }
},

...

  "dependencies": {
    "@unimodules/react-native-adapter": {
      "version": "5.7.0",
      "resolved": "https://registry.npmjs.org/@unimodules/react-native-adapter/-/react-native-adapter-5.7.0.tgz",
      "integrity": "sha512-L557/+sc8ZKJVgo1734HF1QNCxrt/fpqdmdNgySJT+kErux/AJNfPq3flsK0fyJduVmniTutYIMyW48cFoPKDA==",
      "requires": {
        "invariant": "^2.2.4",
        "lodash": "^4.5.0"
      }
    },
    "inline-style-prefixer": {
      "version": "5.1.2",
      "resolved": "https://registry.npmjs.org/inline-style-prefixer/-/inline-style-prefixer-5.1.2.tgz",
      "integrity": "sha512-PYUF+94gDfhy+LsQxM0g3d6Hge4l1pAqOSOiZuHWzMvQEGsbRQ/ck2WioLqrY2ZkHyPgVUXxn+hrkF7D6QUGbA==",
      "peer": true,
      "requires": {
        "css-in-js-utils": "^2.0.0"
      }
    },
    "react-native-web": {
      "version": "0.13.18",
      "resolved": "https://registry.npmjs.org/react-native-web/-/react-native-web-0.13.18.tgz",
      "integrity": "sha512-WR/0ECAmwLQ2+2cL2Ur+0/swXFAtcSM0URoADJmG6D4MnY+wGc91JO8LoOTlgY0USBOY+qG/beRrjFa+RAuOiA==",
      "peer": true,
      "requires": {
        "array-find-index": "^1.0.2",
        "create-react-class": "^15.6.2",
        "deep-assign": "^3.0.0",
        "fbjs": "^1.0.0",
        "hyphenate-style-name": "^1.0.3",
        "inline-style-prefixer": "^5.1.0",
        "normalize-css-color": "^1.0.2",
        "prop-types": "^15.6.0",
        "react-timer-mixin": "^0.13.4"
      }
    }
  }
},

As you see, npm install --force still pins many dependency versions which is stricter.

5
  • 1
    When I'm using yarn instead of npm install it does not seem to get any errors and it installs the packages without prompting any errors? Is there any problem using yarn instead of npm? Commented Oct 22, 2021 at 15:46
  • This is specific to npm
    – JanithaR
    Commented Nov 2, 2021 at 9:12
  • 4
    I don't quite understand, with --legacy-peer-deps it just doesn't install any of the peer dependencies?
    – Plumpie
    Commented Nov 23, 2021 at 11:00
  • 2
    @Plumpie Yes --legacy-peer-deps ignores peer dependencies entirely which may result in an incorrect/broken dependency resolution.
    – Dillon
    Commented Apr 28, 2022 at 15:28
  • 1
    @Dillon so if I ignore peer dependencies entirely, the peer dependencies won't be installed automatically. That must mean that almost every package that has peerDependencies should not work correctly, because it relies on peer packages that are not installed. Am I right?
    – Dominik R.
    Commented Jun 13, 2023 at 12:19
40

For those wondering which is safer, the answer is --force

--legacy-peer-deps ignores peer dependencies entirely, which can screw up your dependency resolution.

--force on the other hand simply sets a different peer dependency version for conflicting dependencies

Using force isn't always ideal though because each dependency version takes up extra space. Using force with many dependencies will increase your total space requirement a decent amount.

0

Use this commands npm config set legacy-peer-deps true then do npm install it will install automatically. Form The next time, I will not repeat to you. it's allowed to install without failing.

-1

If you want a temporary workaround to get rid of npm peer dependency errors or ignore peer-dependencies, use --legacy-peer-deps but to set a different peer dependency tree than the conflicting one, use --force. Find more info here

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.