1

My current cerbot version running is:

certbot --version
certbot 0.27.1

My ngnix has TLS v1.0 but I do not want that running anymore:

cat /etc/letsencrypt/options-ssl-nginx.conf
# This file contains important security parameters. If you modify this file
# manually, Certbot will be unable to automatically provide future security
# updates. Instead, Certbot will print and log an error message with a path to
# the up-to-date file that you will need to refer to when manually updating
# this file.

ssl_session_cache shared:le_nginx_SSL:1m;
ssl_session_timeout 1440m;

ssl_protocols TLSv1 TLSv1.1 TLSv1.2;
ssl_prefer_server_ciphers on;

ssl_ciphers "ECDHE-ECDSA-CHACHA20-POLY1305:ECDHE-RSA-CHACHA20-POLY1305:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256:ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384:ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384:DHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256:DHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-SHA256:ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-SHA:ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384:ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA384:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA:ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA:DHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256:DHE-RSA-AES128-SHA:DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA256:DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA:ECDHE-ECDSA-DES-CBC3-SHA:ECDHE-RSA-DES-CBC3-SHA:EDH-RSA-DES-CBC3-SHA:AES128-GCM-SHA256:AES256-GCM-SHA384:AES128-SHA256:AES256-SHA256:AES128-SHA:AES256-SHA:DES-CBC3-SHA:!DSS";
  • These are managed by certbot as seen and after some reseach I see that the latest version of certbot dont have tls v1.0
  • now I do not know how to update the certbot version.. need help
1
  • Changing the conf file line manually to ssl_protocols TLSv1.1 TLSv1.2; will do the work. you don't have to use the certbot conf as given, it's possible to modify it.
    – ofirule
    Aug 9 at 22:34
3
+50

Certbot uses a configuration file to keep track of all the settings it uses, or at very least a record of the non-default ones. See here for information on that. However, updating certbot itself might be enough as I believe recent versions have been disabling 1.0 and 1.1 by default.

Honestly, I would also remove TLS 1.1 as well, which also has known issues. 1.2 is still safe. The only reason not to would be if clients are still using 1.1, which by now is fairly low of a chance. In fact, all major browsers are dropping support for 1.0 and 1.1 entirely. Support for TLS 1.2 was out in browsers ~2013, so the chances of you needing to support it are not that great.

Also, I always refer to this site which is periodically updated with recommended security configurations. Even their intermediate configuration recommends a minimum of TLS 1.2.

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