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This is a follow up to my questions on the Arguments Optional Challenge in Freecodecamp (see below0:

I have now satisfied 5/6 conditions of the challenge, except for when the input is addTogether(2,([3])), which returns '23' as a string instead of the correct 'undefined'.

If the [3] is an array, and an array is an object, shouldn't my checkNum function work to label that as undefined? Where was the string generated?

my code now:

function addTogether() {
  function checkNum(x) {
    return typeof x === 'number' ? x : undefined;
  }

  let num1 = checkNum(arguments[0]);
  let num2 = checkNum(arguments[1]);

  if (arguments.length === 1) {
    if (typeof num1 === 'number') {
      let a = num1;
      return function (b) {
        return a + b;
      };
    }
    return undefined;
  }

  if (arguments.length > 1) {
    if (typeof num1 !== 'number' || typeof num2 !== 'number') {
      return undefined;
    }
    if (typeof num1 === 'number' && typeof num2 === 'number');
    {
      return arguments[0] + arguments[1];
    }
  }
}

THANKS

//original question below:

I am stuck on the freecodecamp problem Arguments Optional. https://www.freecodecamp.org/learn/javascript-algorithms-and-data-structures/intermediate-algorithm-scripting/arguments-optional In researching the problem, there have been multiple references to the following code-block, but I just can't get my head around what it means:

if(arguments.length==1){
      if (typeof a == "number"){
        return function(b){
          if (typeof b == "number"){
            return a + b;
          }
        };
      }
    }

I understand up to the 'return function(b)' part, then my brain melts.

If someone could please explain it as if to a 6-year-old, this noob would really appreciate the help.

3
  • When the enclosing function returns the function(b) thingy, it is returning a bubble of code that remembers variables it has access to, which happens to include a. So this bubble carries a around with it until it the function itself is called. When that happens, b is passed into the function. The function simply recalls a from its memory and adds it to b. The entire idea is wrapped up (pun intended) in a closure. If you're studying "intermediate JavaScript" - you should study up on it a bit. Reference. Feb 4, 2021 at 5:25
  • If that code blows your mind, take look at what modern code looks like in this Gist that does exactly the same thing as the code you posted: gist.github.com/randycasburn/… Feb 4, 2021 at 5:44
  • wow I can only comprehend 20% of what's going on in that modern code. I have a long way to go...
    – kio777kio
    Feb 4, 2021 at 8:35

2 Answers 2

1

This is quite common practice to return a function instead of a value.

When the outer function (which is supposed to do addition) is called with one argument, instead of doing addition (can't do) it is returning a function. When that function is called subsequently with a number parameter it executes the function b and does the sum.

Let us say the outer function name is add() so it can be triggered the following ways:

add(10, 15); // 25
var f = add(20);
f(18) // 38
add(4)(6) // 10

Full example:

function add(a, b) {
    if (arguments.length == 1) {
        if (typeof a == "number") {
            return function (b) {
                if (typeof b == "number") {
                    return a + b;
                }
            };
        } else {
            return "undefined";
        }
    } else if (arguments.length == 2) {
        if (typeof a == "number" && typeof b == "number") {
            return a + b;
        } else {
            return "undefined";
        }
    } else {
        return "undefined";
    }
}

console.log(add(10, 15));
var f = add(20);
console.log(f(18));
console.log(add("xyz"));
console.log(add(10, "5"));
console.log(add(4)(6));

2
  • follow-up question: I understand that the returned function in this case with parameter b does not need a name, or be assigned to a variable. Is that correct?
    – kio777kio
    Feb 4, 2021 at 5:56
  • That's correct. It's an anonymous function. When returned you may optionally assign to a variable or directly make the second call as add(4)(6) Feb 4, 2021 at 5:59
1

We can declare functions in 2 ways, the regular way:

function test(){
}

or the interesting way

let test = function(){

}

in this case, the function is returning a function see here:

function returnfunction(){
 return function(b){
          if (typeof b == "number"){
            return a + b;
          }
        }
}
let x = returnfunction()

So, x is the return value of returnfunction, which is

function(b){
          if (typeof b == "number"){
            return a + b;
          }
}

So similar to above,

x = function(){
//...
}

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