11

I'm trying to emulate the most basic (toy) case of a vtable in C. Here is a basic example:

typedef struct Person {
    int id;
    char *name;
} Person;

And let's say we add in one method (i.e., function pointer):

typedef struct Person {
    int id;
    char *name;
    void (*print_name)(Person);
} Person;

And now we'll initialize it and fill in the pieces with this (let’s ignore memory leaks):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct Person Person;
typedef struct Person {
    int id;
    char *name;
    void (*print)(Person *self);
} Person;

void print_name(Person *person) {
    printf("Hello %s\n", person->name);
}
Person *init_person(void) {
    Person *person = malloc(sizeof(Person));
    person->print = print_name;
}
int main(void) {
    Person *p = init_person();
    p->name = "Greg";
    p->print(p);
    return 0;
}

Running code here.

If I were to factor out the functions from the Person and put it in a Person_VTable, such as the following:

typedef struct Person {
    int id;
    char *name;
    Person_VTable *vtable;
} Person;

typedef struct Person_VTable {
    ???
} Person_VTable;

What would be the proper way to (1) create the vtable, and (2) initialize the Person object with the new vtable? Note, I know this is an entirely trivial example and it can be done in better ways, but I'm seeing how it can be done with an external 'vtable' to the main object I'm working work.

Also, does this also mean if I have a vtable, instead of just having the one 'self' to reference the object it's coming from when in the struct itself, such as:

void (*print)(Person *self);

I need to have two indirections, so I know both the object and the vtable location? Something like:

void (*print)(Person *self_obj, Person_VTable *self_vt);

If so, that's a lot of overhead!

6
  • Static/global variables?
    – user202729
    Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 7:03
  • 2
    self_obj already contains a vtable member; you don’t need to pass it separately. Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 7:26
  • 1
    In what way is it better to use p->print(p); instead of print_name(p)?
    – klutt
    Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 7:39
  • 2
    @klutt it's not -- again, this is an academic/how-can-it-be-done exercise. I'm a beginner in C and just trying to see how the language works (and where it doesn't work or could be done differently in other places!)
    – David542
    Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 7:42
  • 3
    @David542 Fair enough, I'm all for exploring and abusing languages as long as it's not used for real programming ;)
    – klutt
    Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 7:43

2 Answers 2

10

A basic vtable is nothing more than an ordinary struct containing function pointers, which can be shared between object instances. There are two basic ways one can implement them. One is to make the vtable pointer an ordinary struct member (this is how it works in C++ under the hood):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct Person Person;
typedef struct Person_VTable Person_VTable;

struct Person {
    int id;
    char *name;
    const Person_VTable *vtable;
};

struct Person_VTable {
    void (*print)(Person *self);
};

void print_name(Person *person) {
    printf("Hello %s\n", person->name);
}

static const Person_VTable vtable_Person = {
    .print = print_name
};

Person *init_person(void) {
    Person *person = malloc(sizeof(Person));
    person->vtable = &vtable_Person;
    return person;
}

int main(void) {
    Person *p = init_person();
    p->name = "Greg";
    p->vtable->print(p);
    return 0;
}

Another is to use fat pointers (this is how it’s implemented in Rust):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct Person Person;
typedef struct Person_VTable Person_VTable;

typedef struct Person_Ptr {
    Person *self;
    const Person_VTable *vtable;
} Person_Ptr;

struct Person {
    int id;
    char *name;
};

struct Person_VTable {
    void (*print)(Person_Ptr self);
};

void print_name(Person_Ptr person) {
    printf("Hello %s\n", person.self->name);
}

static const Person_VTable vtable_Person = {
    .print = print_name
};

Person_Ptr init_person(void) {
    Person_Ptr person;
    person.self = malloc(sizeof(Person));
    person.vtable = &vtable_Person;
    return person;
}

int main(void) {
    Person_Ptr p = init_person();
    p.self->name = "Greg";
    p.vtable->print(p);
    return 0;
}

In C, the preferred way is the former, but that’s mostly for syntax reasons: passing structs between functions by value doesn’t have a widely-agreed-upon ABI, while passing two separate pointers is rather unwieldy syntactically. The other method is useful when attaching a vtable to an object whose memory layout is not under your control.

In essence, the only advantages of vtables over ordinary function pointer members is that they conserve memory (each instance of the struct only needs to carry one vtable pointer) and protect against memory corruption (the vtables themselves can reside in read-only memory).

3
  • thank you very much for such a comprehensive answer. What's the advantage of the Rust method? Is it that someone can work with the Person_Ptr and access either the Person values or the VTable functions with a single indirection?
    – David542
    Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 8:07
  • Also, my attempt (in the answer below) was close to your first method!
    – David542
    Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 8:08
  • @David542 The Rust method is useful when you need to attach a vtable to an object whose memory layout you cannot control. Which is what basically forced this choice upon Rust: the trait system allows you to implement traits for types defined externally, as long as you respect the so-called orphan rule (which is probably too long to explain in this comment). Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 8:17
0

You can do this without making too many changes. To start, we will define the Person and Person_VTable types:

typedef struct Person Person;
typedef struct Person_VTable {
    void (*print) (Person* self);
} Person_VTable;

typedef struct Person {
    int id;
    char* name;
    Person_VTable *vtable;
} Person;

Here we have replaced the previous Person function pointer with a pointer to the Person_VTable type, which will hold our functions. The Person_VTable itself is almost identical to what the functions in the Person type were previously -- notice even that the function signatures are the same. For example:

// old
typedef struct Person {
    // ...
    void (*print)(Person *self);
} Person;

// new
typedef struct Person_VTable {
    // ...
    void (*print)(Person *self);
} Person_VTable;

Our init function is also similar, however now we need to malloc for the Person_VTable object, since that is now held outside our main Person object. This will give us:

Person* init_person(void) {
    Person *person = malloc(sizeof(Person));
    // malloc the vtable and attach the print method to it.
    person->vtable  =  malloc(sizeof(Person_VTable));
    person->vtable->print = print_name;
    return person;
}

Finally, to put everything together with a working example here:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

typedef struct Person Person;
typedef struct Person_VTable {
    void (*print) (Person* self);
} Person_VTable;

typedef struct Person {
    int id;
    char* name;
    Person_VTable *vtable;
} Person;

void print_name(Person* person) {
    printf("Hello %s\n", person->name);
}
Person* init_person(void) {
    Person *person = malloc(sizeof(Person));
    person->vtable  =  malloc(sizeof(Person_VTable));
    person->vtable->print = print_name;
    return person;
}
int main(void) {
    Person* self = init_person();
    self->name = "Greg";
    self->vtable->print(self);
    return 0;
}
12
  • 1
    I would probably pass print_name (along with the other pointers to function you could add in your vtable) to init_person function. That would make possible having different behaviors with the same struct according to your needs. Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 7:47
  • 1
    Exactly. The final goal could be passing the vtable as a whole, having your general struct customized according to your needs. This is used in protocols, where you have to call the upper layer handler according to initialization: for example ip_recv will call a general layer 4 recv. Which one? Well... tcp_recv or udp_recv according to socket initialization. Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 7:55
  • 2
    malloc-ing a vtable kind of misses the point of having one. (And so does having a vtable when there is only one function it can contain, as Roberto points out.) The point is that many different objects may need to point to the same set of functions, so it’s advantageous to keep them all in one place. Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 8:13
  • 1
    @David542, yes, this trick is often used in Linux kernel to check if specific object (i.e. a file) originated from a specific subsystem. See elixir.bootlin.com/linux/latest/source/drivers/dma-buf/…
    – tstanisl
    Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 8:48
  • 1
    @David542 Just to nitpick, in a real case you'd probably want to break init_person into separate allocation and construction functions in order to allow for non-heap Person objects.
    – dxiv
    Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 8:53

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