51

Updates

[X] I discovered this happen when TLS::credentials creds is declared on global scope but if I declare it outside seg fault won't happen.

I need it to be global because it helps with caching certificates and that multiple threads can use certificates created by other threads without spending time on creating new certificates.

[X] I further reduced code from 200 lines approx. to 100 lines

I'm using Botan to create a TLS application and my application crash with a seg fault at end of the application.

I made an attempt to debug this with Valgrind but it leading nowhere.

Here is the stack trace from Valgrind,

==3841967== Invalid write of size 8
==3841967==    at 0x4842964: memset (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/valgrind/vgpreload_memcheck-amd64-linux.so)
==3841967==    by 0x566A82F: Botan::deallocate_memory(void*, unsigned long, unsigned long) (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libbotan-2.so.12.12.1)
==3841967==    by 0x55E1A4D: ??? (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libbotan-2.so.12.12.1)
==3841967==    by 0x40EC7B: std::_Sp_counted_base<(__gnu_cxx::_Lock_policy)2>::_M_release() (shared_ptr_base.h:155)
==3841967==    by 0x40EC29: std::__shared_count<(__gnu_cxx::_Lock_policy)2>::~__shared_count() (shared_ptr_base.h:730)
==3841967==    by 0x41112D: std::__shared_ptr<Botan::RSA_Public_Data const, (__gnu_cxx::_Lock_policy)2>::~__shared_ptr() (shared_ptr_base.h:1169)
==3841967==    by 0x411107: std::shared_ptr<Botan::RSA_Public_Data const>::~shared_ptr() (shared_ptr.h:103)
==3841967==    by 0x41109D: Botan::RSA_PublicKey::~RSA_PublicKey() (rsa.h:25)
==3841967==    by 0x410FC1: Botan::RSA_PrivateKey::~RSA_PrivateKey() (rsa.h:92)
==3841967==    by 0x410DC5: Botan::RSA_PrivateKey::~RSA_PrivateKey() (rsa.h:92)
==3841967==    by 0x410E8A: std::_Sp_counted_ptr<Botan::RSA_PrivateKey*, (__gnu_cxx::_Lock_policy)2>::_M_dispose() (shared_ptr_base.h:377)
==3841967==    by 0x40EC7B: std::_Sp_counted_base<(__gnu_cxx::_Lock_policy)2>::_M_release() (shared_ptr_base.h:155)
==3841967==  Address 0x9419080 is not stack'd, malloc'd or (recently) free'd
==3841967== 
==3841967== 
==3841967== Process terminating with default action of signal 11 (SIGSEGV)
==3841967==  Access not within mapped region at address 0x9419080
==3841967==    at 0x4842964: memset (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/valgrind/vgpreload_memcheck-amd64-linux.so)
==3841967==    by 0x566A82F: Botan::deallocate_memory(void*, unsigned long, unsigned long) (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libbotan-2.so.12.12.1)
==3841967==    by 0x55E1A4D: ??? (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libbotan-2.so.12.12.1)
==3841967==    by 0x40EC7B: std::_Sp_counted_base<(__gnu_cxx::_Lock_policy)2>::_M_release() (shared_ptr_base.h:155)
==3841967==    by 0x40EC29: std::__shared_count<(__gnu_cxx::_Lock_policy)2>::~__shared_count() (shared_ptr_base.h:730)
==3841967==    by 0x41112D: std::__shared_ptr<Botan::RSA_Public_Data const, (__gnu_cxx::_Lock_policy)2>::~__shared_ptr() (shared_ptr_base.h:1169)
==3841967==    by 0x411107: std::shared_ptr<Botan::RSA_Public_Data const>::~shared_ptr() (shared_ptr.h:103)
==3841967==    by 0x41109D: Botan::RSA_PublicKey::~RSA_PublicKey() (rsa.h:25)
==3841967==    by 0x410FC1: Botan::RSA_PrivateKey::~RSA_PrivateKey() (rsa.h:92)
==3841967==    by 0x410DC5: Botan::RSA_PrivateKey::~RSA_PrivateKey() (rsa.h:92)
==3841967==    by 0x410E8A: std::_Sp_counted_ptr<Botan::RSA_PrivateKey*, (__gnu_cxx::_Lock_policy)2>::_M_dispose() (shared_ptr_base.h:377)
==3841967==    by 0x40EC7B: std::_Sp_counted_base<(__gnu_cxx::_Lock_policy)2>::_M_release() (shared_ptr_base.h:155)
==3841967==  If you believe this happened as a result of a stack
==3841967==  overflow in your program's main thread (unlikely but
==3841967==  possible), you can try to increase the size of the
==3841967==  main thread stack using the --main-stacksize= flag.
==3841967==  The main thread stack size used in this run was 8388608.
==3841967== 
==3841967== HEAP SUMMARY:
==3841967==     in use at exit: 149,626 bytes in 1,143 blocks
==3841967==   total heap usage: 211,782 allocs, 210,639 frees, 90,582,963 bytes allocated
==3841967== 
==3841967== LEAK SUMMARY:
==3841967==    definitely lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==3841967==    indirectly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==3841967==      possibly lost: 1,352 bytes in 18 blocks
==3841967==    still reachable: 148,274 bytes in 1,125 blocks
==3841967==                       of which reachable via heuristic:
==3841967==                         newarray           : 1,536 bytes in 16 blocks
==3841967==         suppressed: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==3841967== Rerun with --leak-check=full to see details of leaked memory
==3841967== 
==3841967== For lists of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -s
==3841967== ERROR SUMMARY: 1 errors from 1 contexts (suppressed: 0 from 0)
Segmentation fault (core dumped)

You can clone the Botan into your machine by issuing,

git clone https://github.com/randombit/botan.git

Then follow instructions from their official website to build & install it.

You will need to create a Root Certificate Authority to use with the application and for that you must install OpenSSL on your machine.

Create a folder called testApplication and cd into it.

Then using Bash, issue the following series of commands to create a Root CA,

# Generate private key
openssl genrsa -des3 -out myCA.key 2048
# Generate root certificate
openssl req -x509 -new -nodes -key myCA.key -sha256 -days 825 -out myCA.pem
# Convert to Botan Format
openssl pkcs8 -topk8 -in myCA.key > myCAKey.pkcs8.pem

Please use thisispassword as password.

Install clang compiler on your machine and then you can compile the source file as follows,

clang++ example.cpp -o example  -Wthread-safety -Wall -Wextra -g -std=c++17 -pthread -lssl -lcrypto -lbotan-2 --I/usr/include/botan-2

example.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <fstream>
#include <sstream>
#include <botan/tls_server.h>
#include <botan/tls_callbacks.h>
#include <botan/tls_session_manager.h>
#include <botan/tls_policy.h>
#include <botan/auto_rng.h>
#include <botan/certstor.h>
#include <botan/pk_keys.h>
#include <botan/pkcs10.h>
#include <botan/pkcs8.h>
#include <botan/x509self.h>
#include <botan/x509path.h>
#include <botan/x509_ca.h>
#include <botan/x509_ext.h>
#include <botan/pk_algs.h>
#include <botan/ber_dec.h>
#include <botan/der_enc.h>
#include <botan/oids.h>
#include <botan/rsa.h>

namespace TLS
{
    typedef std::chrono::duration<int, std::ratio<31556926>> years;

    class credentials : public Botan::Credentials_Manager
    {
    private:
        struct certificate
        {
            std::vector<Botan::X509_Certificate> certs;
            std::shared_ptr<Botan::Private_Key> key;
        };

        std::vector<certificate> creds;
        std::vector<std::shared_ptr<Botan::Certificate_Store>> store;

    public:
        void createCert(std::string hostname)
        {
            /**
             * Initialize Root CA
            **/

            Botan::AutoSeeded_RNG rng;

            const Botan::X509_Certificate rootCert("myCA.pem");

            std::ifstream rootCertPrivateKeyFile("myCAKey.pkcs8.pem");

            Botan::DataSource_Stream rootCertPrivateKeyStream(rootCertPrivateKeyFile);

            std::unique_ptr<Botan::Private_Key> rootCertPrivateKey = Botan::PKCS8::load_key(rootCertPrivateKeyStream, "thisispassword");

            Botan::X509_CA rootCA(rootCert, *rootCertPrivateKey, "SHA-256", rng);

            /**
            * Generate a Cert & Sign with Root CA
            **/

            Botan::X509_Cert_Options opts;
            std::shared_ptr<Botan::Private_Key> serverPrivateKeyShared(new Botan::RSA_PrivateKey(rng, 4096));
            Botan::RSA_PrivateKey* serverPrivateKey = (Botan::RSA_PrivateKey*)serverPrivateKeyShared.get();

            opts.common_name = hostname;
            opts.country = "US";

            auto now = std::chrono::system_clock::now();

            Botan::X509_Time todayDate(now);
            Botan::X509_Time expireDate(now + years(1));

            Botan::PKCS10_Request req = Botan::X509::create_cert_req(opts, *serverPrivateKey, "SHA-256", rng);

            auto serverCert = rootCA.sign_request(req, rng, todayDate, expireDate);

            /**
             * Load Cert to In-Memory Database
            **/

            certificate cert;

            cert.certs.push_back(serverCert);
            cert.key = serverPrivateKeyShared;

            creds.push_back(cert);
        }
    };
}; // namespace TLS

TLS::credentials globalCreds;

int main() {
    globalCreds.createCert("www.google.com");

    std::cout << "End" << "\n";

    return 0;
}

Here is the function from the Botan Lib that Valgrind refers to,

void deallocate_memory(void* p, size_t elems, size_t elem_size)
   {
   if(p == nullptr)
      return;

   secure_scrub_memory(p, elems * elem_size);

#if defined(BOTAN_HAS_LOCKING_ALLOCATOR)
   if(mlock_allocator::instance().deallocate(p, elems, elem_size))
      return;
#endif

   std::free(p);
   }
6
  • The user don't even need to send Network traffic to reproduce the problem. I've included a packet file for this.. Furthermore, the problem disappears if I move the globally defined creds object into function scope. – jeffbRTC Feb 8 at 21:53
  • 2
    This seems like it could be a problem with the order that global objects are destroyed. Remove the global globalCreds variable and hide it in a "getter" function (TLS::credentials &globalCreds() { static TLS::credentials creds; return creds; } that will ensure it is destroyed before some of the library components it needs are destroyed. – 1201ProgramAlarm Feb 8 at 22:25
  • 1
    @jeffbRTC, are you by any chance able to reproduce the issue on Compiler Explorer? – Enlico Feb 8 at 22:39
  • 1
    @Enlico No. The reason is because you have to build Botan and then create Cert. CE doesn't provide a shell to me. – jeffbRTC Feb 8 at 23:19
  • Does Botan have an "all inclusive" header maybe? That could be of some use in a minimal example, if it has one. Some libraries do, some don't - I didn't check. – Kuba hasn't forgotten Monica Feb 11 at 2:37
40

Author of Botan replied to me that

The problem is the globally defined object.

The problem is that the mlock pool is a singleton created on first use then destroyed sometime after main returns. First your object is created. It allocates memory. This results in the pool being created. Destruction happens LIFO. So first the pool is destroyed. Then your object is destroyed, and attempts to touch memory (to zero it) which has already been unmapped.

Workarounds,

  • Create a Botan::Allocator_Initializer object to force initialization before your object is created (thus the pool lives until after your object has been destructed)
  • Disable locking_allocator module
  • Set env var BOTAN_MLOCK_POOL_SIZE to 0
  • No global vars

In principle the locking allocator instead of munmaping the memory, just zeros it, and leave it to be unmapped by the OS on process exit. This might still break invariants, but not as badly. It also causes valgrind to reports leaks which is obnoxious.

I think because it was mmap'ed directly and not through malloc, valgrind doesn't track it.

2
  • 3
    I think the issue is that you have a global vector holding shared pointers to objects which are therefore destroyed only when the vector is destroyed; but the vector's life time is not linked to the pool. You could clear the vector explicitly before the program exits in order to destroy the objects pointed to. – Peter - Reinstate Monica Feb 10 at 11:43
  • 1
    Alternatively you could create a global "sentinel dummy" key object in the same translation unit as the vector, above the vector. Global objects in the same TU are created in the order of definition; the creation of the dummy key would initiate creation o the pool. Therefore, the pool would be guaranteed to be created before the vector, and hence guaranteed to be destroyed after it. In fact, that dummy key should be a member of credentials and must be declared before the vectors, always creating the sentinel together with (and before) the vector. – Peter - Reinstate Monica Feb 10 at 11:48
12
+50

Global variables, and especially singletons, are the scourge of multithreaded, complex applications. You'll be always running into such problems with this sort of design.

Here's what I usually do: everything global gets defined as a local variable in main or some sub-function, in proper order, so that it gets destroyed in an appropriate reverse order. Dependency-injection-like techniques can be used to pass those objects around in cases where "almost everything" depends on them. It took me some pain to realize that this was essentially the only way that was debuggable in large, complex applications (think 2M loc between the app itself and the dozens of libraries it uses outside of the C++ library). After the globals got eviscerated from the bespoke code, and then from a few problematic libraries, the specter of "death on closure" pretty much vanished. I don't guarantee that it'll fix everyone's problems - since people can be quite creative at coming up with new ones - but it's IMHO a step in the right direction.

6
  • 1
    I see but didn't found any example on your answer. Care to share a single example where you simulate global like behavior with dependency injection? – jeffbRTC Feb 11 at 4:39
  • 1
    I mean a simple C++ code... – jeffbRTC Feb 11 at 4:39
  • @jeffbRTC If it's really necessary to keep the object alive past the end of the program, DI itself as a pattern won't actually fix the root cause of the problem. I think what Kuba is getting at here is more the idea of having a factory method create the object and manage its memory / lifetime. I'd say that a pattern is just a way of managing the object's lifetime conveniently, the important part to establish first is how to keep the object alive and what manages it, which unfortunately is something I don't really have an answer for. – jrh Feb 11 at 17:01
  • @jeffbRTC ... but if I were to take a guess, I'd say that this would have to use the OS as a middleman to communicate with a service (as in, a service running on the PC that continues running long after your program quits). I've done things similar to this but never with security or certificates, I'd guess something like this already exists out there somewhere, since it'd seem like this is a common problem people would have. Remember that the OS reclaims heap memory too, so it's not enough to use new / malloc. – jrh Feb 11 at 17:02
  • @jrh Not really. I don't want to keep the object alive after program exists. I'm not looking for something like systemd. I just want to keep it alive as long as program runs so threads can access it. – jeffbRTC Feb 11 at 17:04
1

This is an example of static de-initialization order ‘fiasco’.

There are technics to prevent this, but as you link libraries they might not work as you can't control their life time.

So the best solution might be to explicit clear the content of globalCreds before the program exits, at end of main or in an atexit function. Next best is to leak the structure if there is no need to clean up.

How to leak example taken from isocpp

TLS::credentials& x() {
  static TLS::credentials* creds = new TLS::credentials();
  return *creds;
}
TLS::credentials &globalCreds = x();

Yes that offends my feeling of neatness too.

But this is just work arounds, globalCreds should be created in main, passed to the classes (that are also created in main, after Creds) that needs it as a reference.

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