1

I have a 2 really long concatenated arrays:

["MyHashMap"
"remove"
"put"
"remove"]
[[]
[27]
[65,65]
[19]]

I just go into visual mode, y the second array, and then go back to the first line, go to the end of it, add space and hit p. It turns into:

["MyHashMap"
[[]
[27]
[65,65]
[19]]
"remove"
"put"
"remove"]

My desired output is:

["MyHashMap" [[]
"remove"     [27]
"put"        [65,65]
"remove"]    [19]]

How can I achieve this?

4
  • I find both the input and the desired output confusing - are you sure that's what you want? Not that I think this can be trivially done in vim.
    – tink
    Feb 10, 2021 at 0:27
  • How come you have 4 opening square brackets [, but 5 closing ones ]?
    – tink
    Feb 10, 2021 at 0:33
  • @tink If you could clarify what specifically confuses you I'd be more than happy to clear it out. Maybe you could suggest a different approach using either sed or awk which I'd also welcome. In essence: I have 2 long arrays of output I copied them both and replaced , with a \n. That transformed 2 lines into 1 long column. Now, I want to make it two columns of input/output so that I can compare the values and find where the bug is. There are more than 2 arrays that I need to arrange in this way for a convenient comparison, but baby steps. Feb 10, 2021 at 0:37
  • @tink About the braces, I just copied sample data that did not necessarily corresponded line - to - line, so one of the braces got lost. But in the real data, there'd be a correct number of braces. Feb 10, 2021 at 0:43

3 Answers 3

5

:set virtualedit=all so you can move the cursor where there is no character (past the end of line).

Move the cursor to the first column of line 5 and enter visual-block mode with CTRL-V. Select the content of the last four lines. Press d to delete the selection.

Move the cursor to the first line, where you want your second column. Press p to paste.

4
  • Cool - learnt something new; hadn't come across :set virtualedit=all so far.
    – tink
    Feb 10, 2021 at 0:40
  • @ProgMetalSlug same result. The only diff is that I don't have a movement boundary. The deleted column still gets pasted after the first line. Feb 10, 2021 at 0:42
  • @user3081519 Make sure to select the text with visual block mode (CTRL-V). This won't work with visual mode (v) nor with visual line mode (V aka SHIFT-V).
    – gdupras
    Feb 10, 2021 at 0:55
  • Yeahhhhhh this worked! My fingers were slapping a regular visual by habit. Thanks a bunch! Feb 10, 2021 at 1:06
2

So ... back to your original data format (for completeness I added an extra "row"):

Here the data:

$ cat yuck
["MyHashMap","remove","put","put"]
["MyMashNap","mover","gut","hut"]
[[],44],[95,30]]

Here an awk script:

$ cat a.f 
BEGIN{
      FS=","
}
{
  for (f = 1; f <= NF; f++) { a[NR, f] = $f } 
}
NF > nf { nf = NF }
END {
  for (f = 1; f <= nf; f++) {
      for (r = 1; r <= NR; r++) {
          printf a[r, f] (r==NR ? RS : OFS)
      }
  }
}

And how to run it:

$ awk  -f a.f yuck  | column -t
["MyHashMap"  ["MyMashNap"  [[]
"remove"      "mover"       44]
"put"         "gut"         [95
"put"]        "hut"]        30]]
2
  • Going to upvote your answer just out of respect of how much work that was. Thank you! Feb 10, 2021 at 1:07
  • Heh - thanks. Just consider it as a slightly less "manual" approach when the number of arrays gets bigger. ;)
    – tink
    Feb 10, 2021 at 1:13
1

Using visual block selection:

If you are at the first line:

4j ............. jump to line five 
Ctrl-v ......... start visual block
3j$ ............ select the end of the paragraph
dgg ............ delete and goes to the first line
A<Space> ....... add an extra space
<Esc>p ......... paste deleted block

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