28

What would be the easiest way to convert a number to base 2 (in a string, as for example 5 would be converted to "0000000000000101") in R? There is intToBits, but it returns a vector of strings rather than a string:

> intToBits(12)
 [1] 00 00 01 01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
[26] 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

I have tried some other functions, but had no success:

> toString(intToBits(12))
[1] "00, 00, 01, 01, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00, 00"
  • 1
    intToBits does not return a vector of strings. It returns a raw vector. Notice the vector has 32 elements. That's one element for each bit (since R uses 32-bit integers). I can't think of a situation where it would be useful to represent a number as a literal string of bits... what are you trying to do? – Joshua Ulrich Jul 7 '11 at 17:10
  • 1
    @Jay: R is not GNU – 42- Jul 7 '11 at 17:18
  • 2
    @DWin: It's actually listed as "GNU R statistical computation and graphics system" in Debian, and the project page says it's a GNU project, that's why I called it GNU R. Not that I'm picky about these things -- I got used to saying "GNU R" to help disambiguate (doing a Google search for "R" isn't really useful). – Jay Jul 7 '11 at 17:23
  • 5
    It annoys the R Core to see it referred to as GNU R. Since they are the authors, I figure they get the final say. And searching on GNU R is going to miss a majority of what is on the Net. Use "r-project" as a term or use RSiteSearch() or rseek as search engines. Some people report success with "r:language" as a Google term. – 42- Jul 7 '11 at 17:35
  • 1
    Or, search with [r] – nsheff Aug 20 '14 at 10:01

10 Answers 10

18

Note that intToBits() returns a 'raw' vector, not a character vector (strings). Note that my answer is a slight extension of @nico's original answer that removes the leading "0" from each bit:

paste(sapply(strsplit(paste(rev(intToBits(12))),""),`[[`,2),collapse="")
[1] "00000000000000000000000000001100"

To break down the steps, for clarity:

# bit pattern for the 32-bit integer '12'
x <- intToBits(12)
# reverse so smallest bit is first (little endian)
x <- rev(x)
# convert to character
x <- as.character(x)
# Extract only the second element (remove leading "0" from each bit)
x <- sapply(strsplit(x, "", fixed = TRUE), `[`, 2)
# Concatenate all bits into one string
x <- paste(x, collapse = "")
x
# [1] "00000000000000000000000000001100"

Or, as @nico showed, we can use as.integer() as a more concise way to remove the leading zero from each bit.

x <- rev(intToBits(12))
x <- paste(as.integer(x), collapse = "")
# [1] "00000000000000000000000000001100"

Just for copy-paste convenience, here's a function version of the above:

dec2bin <- function(x) paste(as.integer(rev(intToBits(x))), collapse = "")
  • too many bits tho, what's a clean way to fix that? – bubakazouba Nov 9 '15 at 1:46
  • @bubakazouba: in this example, 12 is a 32-bit integer. Why do you think it has too many bits? What's to fix? – Joshua Ulrich Nov 9 '15 at 3:53
  • Im sorry I just meant it's alot of bits for what I need, I didnt mean "fix" as there is something wrong to be repaired. I just meant is there a simple way to vary the number of bits? – bubakazouba Nov 9 '15 at 3:54
  • @bubakazouba: in short, no. Base R only has 32-bit integers. If you know the number can be represented in a smaller number of bits (e.g. a byte or short), you could extract only the right-most X bits using substr. But you should really be using readBin and writeBin to deal with binary data. – Joshua Ulrich Nov 9 '15 at 4:05
  • @MichaelChirico: thanks for the clarifying edit! I removed the piped version, since I don't actually use pipes and wouldn't be able to address any comments/questions about why it was written that way. I think you should add a piped version as a separate answer. I'm sure it will be useful to others. – Joshua Ulrich Apr 4 '18 at 11:32
24

paste(rev(as.integer(intToBits(12))), collapse="") does the job

paste with the collapse parameter collapses the vector into a string. You have to use rev to get the correct byte order though.

as.integer removes the extra zeros

15

I think that you can use R.utils package, then the intToBin() function

>library(R.utils)

>intToBin(12)
[1] "1100"

> typeof(intToBin(12))
[1] "character"
7

intToBits is limited to maximum 2^32, but what if we want to convert 1e10 to binary? Here is function for converting float numbers to binary, assuming as they are big integers stored as numeric.

dec2bin <- function(fnum) {
  bin_vect <- rep(0, 1 + floor(log(fnum, 2)))
  while (fnum >= 2) {
    pow <- floor(log(fnum, 2))
    bin_vect[1 + pow] <- 1
    fnum <- fnum - 2^pow
  } # while
  bin_vect[1] <- fnum %% 2
  paste(rev(bin_vect), collapse = "")
} #dec2bin

This function begins to loose digits after 2^53 = 9.007199e15, but works fine for smaller numbers.

microbenchmark(dec2bin(1e10+111))
# Unit: microseconds
#                 expr     min       lq     mean   median      uq    max neval
# dec2bin(1e+10 + 111) 123.417 125.2335 129.0902 126.0415 126.893 285.64   100
dec2bin(9e15)
# [1] "11111111110010111001111001010111110101000000000000000"
dec2bin(9e15 + 1)
# [1] "11111111110010111001111001010111110101000000000000001"
dec2bin(9.1e15 + 1)
# [1] "100000010101000110011011011011011101001100000000000000"
  • I don't need to convert such large numbers, but great answer anyway! +1 – Jay Jun 23 '15 at 12:55
  • 2
    I faced a problem where I need to operate with big numbers and after searching on stackoverflow for a solution finally wrote my own code :) – inscaven Jun 23 '15 at 13:24
6

Have a look at the R.utils package - there you have a function called intToBin...

http://rss.acs.unt.edu/Rdoc/library/R.utils/html/intToBin.html

4

Oh, but what to do if you have a 64 bit integer as enabled by the bit64 package? Every answer given, other than that of @epwalsh will not operate on the 64 bit integer because the C based internals of R and R.utils do not support it. @epwalsh's solution is great and works in R if you load the bit64 package first, except it (using loops) in R is dog slow (all speeds are relative).

o.dectobin <- function(y) {
  # find the binary sequence corresponding to the decimal number 'y'
  stopifnot(length(y) == 1, mode(y) == 'numeric')
  q1 <- (y / 2) %/% 1
  r <- y - q1 * 2
  res = c(r)
  while (q1 >= 1) {
    q2 <- (q1 / 2) %/% 1
    r <- q1 - q2 * 2
    q1 <- q2
    res = c(r, res)
  }
  return(res)
}

dat <- sort(sample(0:.Machine$integer.max,1000000))
system.time({sapply(dat,o.dectobin)})
#   user  system elapsed 
# 61.255   0.076  61.256 

We can make this better if we byte compile it...

library(compiler)
c.dectobin <- cmpfun(o.dectobin)
system.time({sapply(dat,c.dectobin)})
#   user  system elapsed 
# 38.260   0.010  38.222 

... but it is still pretty slow. We can get substantially faster if we write our own internals in C (which is what I have done here borrowing from @epwalsh's code - I'm not a C programmer, obviously)...

library(Rcpp)
library(inline)
library(compiler)
intToBin64.worker <- cxxfunction( signature(x = "string") , '    
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <algorithm>
// Convert the string to an integer
std::stringstream ssin(as<std::string>(x));
long y;
ssin >> y;

// Prep output string
std::stringstream ssout;


// Do some math
int64_t q2;
int64_t q1 = (y / 2) / 1;
int64_t r = y - q1 * 2;
ssout << r;
while (q1 >= 1) {
q2 = (q1 / 2) / 1;
r = q1 - q2 * 2;
q1 = q2;
ssout << r;
}


// Finalize string
//ssout << r;
//ssout << q1;
std::string str = ssout.str();
std::reverse(str.begin(), str.end());
return wrap(str);
', plugin = "Rcpp" )

system.time(sapply(as.character(dat),intToBin64.worker))
#   user  system elapsed 
#  7.166   0.010   7.168 

```

  • 1
    ... which I now notice is entirely absurd because bit64 has a as.bitstring function that is twice as fast as my Rcpp function... but I'll leave this here as a monument to folly and as a potential reminder of how to bridge from integer64 to C++ and back... but definitely see the bit64 source code if you need a more efficient way to do just that. – russellpierce May 14 '15 at 14:13
  • Your "monument to folly" comment made me think of: despair.com/products/mistakes. – Joshua Ulrich Apr 4 '18 at 11:33
  • I wonder if just re-tooling the internal intToBits to handle wider inputs wouldn't do just fine? github.com/wch/r-source/blob/… – MichaelChirico Apr 4 '18 at 12:40
  • @MichaelChirico IIRC bit64 implements 64 bit integers under the hood in two doubles. So, I'd be a little surprised if things ran smoothly just by changing the vector and loop bounds. Also... oddly surprised to see comments on this low ranked answer after three years. =) – russellpierce Apr 4 '18 at 12:57
  • 2
    bit64 implements integer64 as one double--a REALSXP. A double is 64 bits, as is a 64-bit integer. Same amount of memory, but the contents are represented differently. My comment was due to being on this page to address @MichaelChirico's comment / edit to my answer. I happened to read your comment, which made me smile and think of that link. – Joshua Ulrich Apr 4 '18 at 13:53
3

This function will take a decimal number and return the corresponding binary sequence, i.e. a vector of 1's and 0's

dectobin <- function(y) {
  # find the binary sequence corresponding to the decimal number 'y'
  stopifnot(length(y) == 1, mode(y) == 'numeric')
  q1 <- (y / 2) %/% 1
  r <- y - q1 * 2
  res = c(r)
  while (q1 >= 1) {
    q2 <- (q1 / 2) %/% 1
    r <- q1 - q2 * 2
    q1 <- q2
    res = c(r, res)
  }
  return(res)
}
  • I think it's better to write y %/% 2 – skan Apr 27 '17 at 9:50
2

Try »binaryLogic«

library(binaryLogic)

ultimate_question_of_life_the_universe_and_everything <- as.binary(42)

summary(ultimate_question_of_life_the_universe_and_everything)
#>   Signedness  Endianess value<0 Size[bit] Base10
#> 1   unsigned Big-Endian   FALSE         6     42

> as.binary(0:3, n=2)
[[1]]
[1] 0 0

[[2]]
[1] 0 1

[[3]]
[1] 1 0

[[4]]
[1] 1 1
1

--originally added as an edit to @JoshuaUlrich's answer since it's entirely a corollary of his and @nico's; he suggested I add a separate answer since it introduces a package outside his ken--

Since @JoshuaUlrich's answer is so functional (6 back-to-back functions), I find the pipe (%>%) operator of magrittr/tidyverse makes the following solution more elegant:

library(magrittr)

intToBits(12) %>% rev %>% as.integer %>% paste(collapse = '')
# [1] "00000000000000000000000000001100"

We can also add one final as.integer call to truncate all those leading zeros:

intToBits(12) %>% rev %>% as.integer %>% paste(collapse = '') %>% as.integer
# [1] 1100

(note of course that this again stored as integer, meaning R considers it as 1100 represented in base 10, not 12 represented in base 2)

Note that @ramanudle's (and others', notably @russellpierce, who gives a C++ implementation) approach is often the standard suggested in low-level languages as it's quite an efficient approach (and it works for any number that can be stored in R, i.e, not limited to integer range).

Also worth mentioning that the C implementation of intToBits is remarkably straightforward (except that I don't know the & or >>= operators in C)

-2
decimal.number<-5

i=0

result<-numeric()

while(decimal.number>0){

  remainder<-decimal.number%%2

  result[i]<-remainder

  decimal.number<-decimal.number%/%2

  i<-i+1
}
  • While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding how and why it solves the problem would improve the answer's long-term value. – Alexander Feb 11 '18 at 17:01

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.