455

In JavaScript, when converting from a float to a string, how can I get just 2 digits after the decimal point? For example, 0.34 instead of 0.3445434.

1
  • 19
    Just some nit-picking: do you want to 'chop off' all but the two first digits, or do you want to round to two digits?
    – xtofl
    Mar 19 '09 at 9:45

14 Answers 14

897

There are functions to round numbers. For example:

var x = 5.0364342423;
print(x.toFixed(2));

will print 5.04.

EDIT: Fiddle

8
  • 7
    I would recommend against using print() in a browser though
    – cobbal
    Mar 19 '09 at 9:45
  • 74
    Be careful about this, toFixed() returns a string: var x = 5.036432346; var y = x.toFixed(2) + 100; y will be equal "5.03100"
    – Vlad
    Oct 4 '12 at 4:16
  • 5
    Be aware that (1e100).toFixed(2) === "1e+100"
    – qbolec
    Feb 15 '14 at 16:18
  • 7
    Also, beware of inconsistent rounding : (0.335).toFixed(2) == 0.34 == (0.345).toFixed(2) Aug 10 '15 at 16:12
  • 5
    If you search for an equivalent of toFixed but with consistent rounding, use toLocaleString : (0.345).toLocaleString('en-EN',{minimumFractionDigits:2, maximumFractionDigits:2})
    – fred727
    Aug 29 '18 at 7:55
245
var result = Math.round(original*100)/100;

The specifics, in case the code isn't self-explanatory.

edit: ...or just use toFixed, as proposed by Tim Büthe. Forgot that one, thanks (and an upvote) for reminder :)

3
  • 1
    I was using this in library "Highchart" where it doesn't accepts string values hence toFixed didn't worked for me, Math.round solved my issue, thanks Jun 23 '15 at 13:11
  • 6
    toFixed() will mimic what something like printf() does in C. However, toFixed() and Math.round() will handle rounding differently. In this case, toFixed() will have the same sort of effect Math.floor() would have (granted you're multiplying the original by 10^n beforehand, and calling toFixed() with n digits). The "correctness" of the answer is very dependent on what the OP wants here, and both are "correct" in their own way.
    – DDPWNAGE
    Apr 17 '18 at 5:31
  • 1
    The method proposed here is unfortunately not a good one, because it can result into unexpected values like 4.99999999998 etc, because of how binary base works. Please use toFixed instead.
    – Karveiani
    Oct 18 '20 at 0:37
189

Be careful when using toFixed():

First, rounding the number is done using the binary representation of the number, which might lead to unexpected behaviour. For example

(0.595).toFixed(2) === '0.59'

instead of '0.6'.

Second, there's an IE bug with toFixed(). In IE (at least up to version 7, didn't check IE8), the following holds true:

(0.9).toFixed(0) === '0'

It might be a good idea to follow kkyy's suggestion or to use a custom toFixed() function, eg

function toFixed(value, precision) {
    var power = Math.pow(10, precision || 0);
    return String(Math.round(value * power) / power);
}
7
  • Yes, this can be very important when creating code to predict prices. Thanks! +1 Oct 7 '10 at 15:39
  • 11
    I would suggest adding the native .toFixed() method in the return value, which will add the required amount of precision, eg: return (Math.round(value * power) / power).toFixed(precision); and also return the value as a string. Otherwise, precision of 20 is ignored for smaller decimals Aug 22 '11 at 17:33
  • 3
    One note regarding toFixed: note that increasing the precision can yield unexpected results: (1.2).toFixed(16) === "1.2000000000000000", while (1.2).toFixed(17) === "1.19999999999999996" (in Firefox/Chrome; in IE8 the latter doesn't hold due to lower precision that IE8 can offer internally).
    – jakub.g
    May 13 '13 at 8:54
  • 2
    Please note that even (0.598).toFixed(2) does not produce 0.6. It produces 0.60 :)
    – qbolec
    Mar 25 '15 at 7:14
  • 1
    Also, beware of inconstistent rounding : (0.335).toFixed(2) == 0.34 == (0.345).toFixed(2). Aug 10 '15 at 16:14
41

One more problem to be aware of, is that toFixed() can produce unnecessary zeros at the end of the number. For example:

var x=(23-7.37)
x
15.629999999999999
x.toFixed(6)
"15.630000"

The idea is to clean up the output using a RegExp:

function humanize(x){
  return x.toFixed(6).replace(/\.?0*$/,'');
}

The RegExp matches the trailing zeros (and optionally the decimal point) to make sure it looks good for integers as well.

humanize(23-7.37)
"15.63"
humanize(1200)
"1200"
humanize(1200.03)
"1200.03"
humanize(3/4)
"0.75"
humanize(4/3)
"1.333333"
3
  • Number.prototype.minFixed = function(decimals) { return this.toFixed(decimals).replace(/\.?0*$/, ""); }
    – Luc Bloom
    Jan 31 '18 at 22:43
  • This should be acepted, trailing zeros are annoying, I was looking exactly for this solution, gj.
    – exoslav
    Jun 6 '18 at 8:19
  • 2
    Trailing zeros may be annoying, but this is exactly what the method name "toFixed" promises to do ;)
    – ksadowski
    Jul 10 '19 at 11:48
12
var x = 0.3445434
x = Math.round (x*100) / 100 // this will make nice rounding
2
  • Math.round(1.015 * 100) / 100 gives 1.01 while we would expect it to be 1.02 ?
    – gaurav5430
    Dec 26 '19 at 5:05
  • console.log(Math.round((1.015 + 0.00001) * 100) / 100) // 1.02 this would solve the above case
    – knock out
    Sep 13 at 10:20
6

There is a problem with all those solutions floating around using multipliers. Both kkyy and Christoph's solutions are wrong unfortunately.

Please test your code for number 551.175 with 2 decimal places - it will round to 551.17 while it should be 551.18 ! But if you test for ex. 451.175 it will be ok - 451.18. So it's difficult to spot this error at a first glance.

The problem is with multiplying: try 551.175 * 100 = 55117.49999999999 (ups!)

So my idea is to treat it with toFixed() before using Math.round();

function roundFix(number, precision)
{
    var multi = Math.pow(10, precision);
    return Math.round( (number * multi).toFixed(precision + 1) ) / multi;
}
2
  • 1
    That's the problem with arithmetic in js: (551.175 * 10 * 10) !== (551.175 * 100). You have to use decimal increments to move the comma for non real decimal results.
    – Kir Kanos
    Mar 31 '14 at 15:55
  • +1 for noticing this, however toFixed is affected as well — (0.335).toFixed(2) == 0.34 == (0.345).toFixed(2)… Whichever method is used, better add an epsilon before the rounding. Aug 10 '15 at 15:56
5

The key here I guess is to round up correctly first, then you can convert it to String.

function roundOf(n, p) {
    const n1 = n * Math.pow(10, p + 1);
    const n2 = Math.floor(n1 / 10);
    if (n1 >= (n2 * 10 + 5)) {
        return (n2 + 1) / Math.pow(10, p);
    }
    return n2 / Math.pow(10, p);
}

// All edge cases listed in this thread
roundOf(95.345, 2); // 95.35
roundOf(95.344, 2); // 95.34
roundOf(5.0364342423, 2); // 5.04
roundOf(0.595, 2); // 0.60
roundOf(0.335, 2); // 0.34
roundOf(0.345, 2); // 0.35
roundOf(551.175, 2); // 551.18
roundOf(0.3445434, 2); // 0.34

Now you can safely format this value with toFixed(p). So with your specific case:

roundOf(0.3445434, 2).toFixed(2); // 0.34
1
  • .toFixed(2) converts a number into a string, rounding the number to keep only two decimals Nov 19 '20 at 9:19
4

If you want the string without round you can use this RegEx (maybe is not the most efficient way... but is really easy)

(2.34567778).toString().match(/\d+\.\d{2}/)[0]
// '2.34'
1
function trimNumber(num, len) {
  const modulu_one = 1;
  const start_numbers_float=2;
  var int_part = Math.trunc(num);
  var float_part = String(num % modulu_one);
      float_part = float_part.slice(start_numbers_float, start_numbers_float+len);
  return int_part+'.'+float_part;
}
1
  • great answer except that you are missing semicolons ( No, in es6 semicolons are not obsolete and we still have to use them in some cases). I had to also edit last row to: return float_part ? int_part+'.'+float_part : int_part; otherwise if you passed Integer, it returned number with a dot at the end (example input: 2100, output: 2100.) Oct 3 '17 at 10:24
0

Maybe you'll also want decimal separator? Here is a function I just made:

function formatFloat(num,casasDec,sepDecimal,sepMilhar) {
    if (num < 0)
    {
        num = -num;
        sinal = -1;
    } else
        sinal = 1;
    var resposta = "";
    var part = "";
    if (num != Math.floor(num)) // decimal values present
    {
        part = Math.round((num-Math.floor(num))*Math.pow(10,casasDec)).toString(); // transforms decimal part into integer (rounded)
        while (part.length < casasDec)
            part = '0'+part;
        if (casasDec > 0)
        {
            resposta = sepDecimal+part;
            num = Math.floor(num);
        } else
            num = Math.round(num);
    } // end of decimal part
    while (num > 0) // integer part
    {
        part = (num - Math.floor(num/1000)*1000).toString(); // part = three less significant digits
        num = Math.floor(num/1000);
        if (num > 0)
            while (part.length < 3) // 123.023.123  if sepMilhar = '.'
                part = '0'+part; // 023
        resposta = part+resposta;
        if (num > 0)
            resposta = sepMilhar+resposta;
    }
    if (sinal < 0)
        resposta = '-'+resposta;
    return resposta;
}
0

There is no way to avoid inconsistent rounding for prices with x.xx5 as actual value using either multiplication or division. If you need to calculate correct prices client-side you should keep all amounts in cents. This is due to the nature of the internal representation of numeric values in JavaScript. Notice that Excel suffers from the same problems so most people wouldn't notice the small errors caused by this phenomen. However errors may accumulate whenever you add up a lot of calculated values, there is a whole theory around this involving the order of calculations and other methods to minimize the error in the final result. To emphasize on the problems with decimal values, please note that 0.1 + 0.2 is not exactly equal to 0.3 in JavaScript, while 1 + 2 is equal to 3.

2
  • the solution would be to separate entire part and decimal part, and represent them as integers in base 10, instead of using floats, here it works without problem for prettyPrint, but in general you have to choose between a base and another, a represention for real numbers and another, each has its problems
    – reuns
    Nov 6 '15 at 18:54
  • "Excel suffers from the same problems". source ?
    – gaurav5430
    Dec 26 '19 at 5:07
0
/** don't spend 5 minutes, use my code **/
function prettyFloat(x,nbDec) { 
    if (!nbDec) nbDec = 100;
    var a = Math.abs(x);
    var e = Math.floor(a);
    var d = Math.round((a-e)*nbDec); if (d == nbDec) { d=0; e++; }
    var signStr = (x<0) ? "-" : " ";
    var decStr = d.toString(); var tmp = 10; while(tmp<nbDec && d*tmp < nbDec) {decStr = "0"+decStr; tmp*=10;}
    var eStr = e.toString();
    return signStr+eStr+"."+decStr;
}

prettyFloat(0);      //  "0.00"
prettyFloat(-1);     // "-1.00"
prettyFloat(-0.999); // "-1.00"
prettyFloat(0.5);    //  "0.50"
0

I use this code to format floats. It is based on toPrecision() but it strips unnecessary zeros. I would welcome suggestions for how to simplify the regex.

function round(x, n) {
    var exp = Math.pow(10, n);
    return Math.floor(x*exp + 0.5)/exp;
}

Usage example:

function test(x, n, d) {
    var rounded = rnd(x, d);
    var result = rounded.toPrecision(n);
    result = result.replace(/\.?0*$/, '');
    result = result.replace(/\.?0*e/, 'e');
    result = result.replace('e+', 'e');
    return result;  
}

document.write(test(1.2000e45, 3, 2) + '=' + '1.2e45' + '<br>');
document.write(test(1.2000e+45, 3, 2) + '=' + '1.2e45' + '<br>');
document.write(test(1.2340e45, 3, 2) + '=' + '1.23e45' + '<br>');
document.write(test(1.2350e45, 3, 2) + '=' + '1.24e45' + '<br>');
document.write(test(1.0000, 3, 2) + '=' + '1' + '<br>');
document.write(test(1.0100, 3, 2) + '=' + '1.01' + '<br>');
document.write(test(1.2340, 4, 2) + '=' + '1.23' + '<br>');
document.write(test(1.2350, 4, 2) + '=' + '1.24' + '<br>');
0

countDecimals = value => {
    if (Math.floor(value) === value) return 0;
    let stringValue = value.toString().split(".")[1];
    if (stringValue) {
      return value.toString().split(".")[1].length
        ? value.toString().split(".")[1].length
        : 0;
    } else {
      return 0;
    }
  };
  
formatNumber=(ans)=>{
    let decimalPlaces = this.countDecimals(ans);
    ans = 1 * ans;
    if (decimalPlaces !== 0) {
      let onePlusAns = ans + 1;
      let decimalOnePlus = this.countDecimals(onePlusAns);
      if (decimalOnePlus < decimalPlaces) {
        ans = ans.toFixed(decimalPlaces - 1).replace(/\.?0*$/, "");
      } else {
        let tenMulAns = ans * 10;
        let decimalTenMul = this.countDecimals(tenMulAns);
        if (decimalTenMul + 1 < decimalPlaces) {
          ans = ans.toFixed(decimalPlaces - 1).replace(/\.?0*$/, "");
        }
      }
    }
}

I just add 1 to the value and count the decimal digits present in the original value and the added value. If I find the decimal digits after adding one less than the original decimal digits, I just call the toFixed() with (original decimals - 1). I also check by multiplying the original value by 10 and follow the same logic in case adding one doesn't reduce redundant decimal places. A simple workaround to handle floating-point number rounding in JS. Works in most cases I tried.

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