3

C++20 is introducing a new comparison type: std::weak_ordering.

It allows for representing less than, equal to, or greater than.

However, some older functions use an int for a similar purpose. Such as qsort, which uses the signature

int compar (const void* p1, const void* p2);

How can I cast std::weak_ordering to int for the use in a function such as qsort?

Here is an example situation:

#include <compare>
#include <iostream>

int main() {
    long a = 2354, b = 1234;
    std::weak_ordering cmp = a <=> b;
    
    if (cmp > 0)  std::cout << "a is greater than b" << std::endl;
    if (cmp == 0) std::cout << "a is equal to b" << std::endl;
    if (cmp < 0)  std::cout << "a is less than b" << std::endl;

    int equivalent_cmp = cmp; // errors
}

In testing, I noticed that using a reinterpret_cast to int8_t type does work, but I am not sure if this would be portable.

int equivalent_cmp = *(int8_t *)&cmp;

or equivalently,

int equivalent_cmp = *reinterpret_cast<int8_t*>(&cmp);

Is this safe?

Furthermore, there are some other solutions that can work, but are inefficient compared this "unsafe" method. All of these would be slower than the above solutions

    int equivalent_cmp = (a > b) - (a < b);

or

    int equivalent_cmp;
    if (cmp < 0)       equivalent_cmp = -1;
    else if (cmp == 0) equivalent_cmp =  0;
    else               equivalent_cmp =  1;

Is there a better solution that would be guaranteed to work?

6
  • This is C++. Why are you using qsort() instead of std::sort?
    – tadman
    Commented Feb 13, 2021 at 1:28
  • For the example of a function that uses an int as a compare type. It's only an example.
    – The Matt
    Commented Feb 13, 2021 at 1:38
  • "forcing a cast" That's not forcing a cast. Commented Feb 13, 2021 at 1:51
  • What I mean is that C++, especially newer versions, have different expectations than old C functions like qsort() so the differences in C++ are largely academic, if not irrelevant.
    – tadman
    Commented Feb 13, 2021 at 3:22
  • @NicolBolas Point taken. Edits made. I presume that kind of cast is called a reinterpretation cast. Though I am not confident to be honest.
    – The Matt
    Commented Feb 14, 2021 at 1:25

3 Answers 3

5

Is there a better solution that would be guaranteed to work?

No.

The standard does not specify the contents or representation of the ordering classes. Barry's answer is based on reasonable assumptions, that are likely to hold, but they are not guaranteed.

Should you need it, your best bet is to write something like your last snippet

constexpr int ordering_as_int(std::weak_ordering cmp) noexcept {
    return (cmp < 0) ? -1 : ((cmp == 0) ? 0 : 1);
}
5

How can I cast std::weak_ordering to int for the use in a function such as qsort?

The easy answer is: don't use qsort, use std::sort, it'll perform better anyway.


That said, we know that std::weak_ordering has to have some integral type member, and C++20 does come with a mechanism to pull it out: std::bit_cast:

static_assert(std::bit_cast<int8_t>(0 <=> 1) == -1);

The rule is that the type you're casting to (in this case int8_t) has to be the same size as the type you're casting from (in this case std::strong_ordering). That's a constraint on bit_cast, so it's safe - if the implementation actually stores an int instead of an int8_t, this won't compile.

So more generally, you'd have to write a short metaprogram to determine the correct signed integer type to cast into.


Note that while weak_ordering and strong_ordering will just be implemented as storing an integer (though not int as illustrated in the standard), partial_ordering will probably not be implemented as storing an int and a bool - it will likely still be implemented as a single integer. So this trick won't work.

7
  • "you'd have to write a short metaprogram". Would you mind elaborating? How would one decide the correct type at compile time?
    – The Matt
    Commented Feb 14, 2021 at 1:05
  • And I agree std::sort would be better than qsort. It was just an example.
    – The Matt
    Commented Feb 14, 2021 at 1:06
  • Except both gcc and VC++ use a common enum type for all three implementations, where less==-1, equal==0 and greater==1. Frankly, it's silly that these aren't just defined as enums!
    – Spencer
    Commented Jan 4, 2023 at 18:50
  • @Spencer You can't make two enums that are convertible to each other (or in this case, having strong_ordering convertible to weak_ordering convertible to partial_ordering).
    – Barry
    Commented Jan 4, 2023 at 19:42
  • @Barry Is there a need for implicit conversion like that? Otherwise a static_cast (or a function that wraps one) would suffice.
    – Spencer
    Commented Jan 4, 2023 at 19:45
1

I needed this conversion recently and came up with this solution, which will use bit_cast if possible and otherwise will fall back to slower method.

template<typename T>
concept Sane_ordering =
    std::bit_cast<signed char>(T::equivalent) == 0 &&
    std::bit_cast<signed char>(T::less) < 0 &&
    std::bit_cast<signed char>(T::greater) > 0;

template<Sane_ordering T>
inline constexpr int to_int_helper(T ordering) {
    return std::bit_cast<signed char>(ordering);
}

template<typename T>
inline constexpr int to_int_helper(T ordering) {
    return (ordering > 0) - (ordering < 0);
}

inline constexpr int to_int(std::weak_ordering ordering) {
    return to_int_helper(ordering);
}

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