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How can I make a mysql connection inside a function if my mysql connect is in another include file?

Here is the mysql connect include file.

DEFINE ('DB_USER', 'username');
DEFINE ('DB_PASSWORD', 'password');
DEFINE ('DB_HOST', 'localhost');
DEFINE ('DB_NAME', 'adfg');

$dbc = mysqli_connect (DB_HOST, DB_USER, DB_PASSWORD, DB_NAME);

if (!$dbc) {
    trigger_error ('Could not connect to MySQL: ' . mysqli_connect_error() );
}
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File: DB.php

DEFINE ('DB_USER', 'username');
DEFINE ('DB_PASSWORD', 'password');
DEFINE ('DB_HOST', 'localhost');
DEFINE ('DB_NAME', 'adfg');

function getConnection() {
  $dbc = mysqli_connect (DB_HOST, DB_USER, DB_PASSWORD, DB_NAME);

  if (!$dbc) {
    trigger_error ('Could not connect to MySQL: ' . mysqli_connect_error() );
  } else {
    return $dbc;
  }
}

Other file:

require_once '/path/to/DB.php';

$connection = getConnection();
var_dump($connection->host_info);
  • can I put the define functions inside the user defined function? – dash Jul 7 '11 at 23:42
  • It is not required! Using constants is an good way of using config settings and they are globally available, there is no need of placing them inside the function. You could place them in an extra file called config.php and require this file at the top of your DB.php file. This is the common way of setting those variables. – powtac Jul 7 '11 at 23:44
  • can I also put the return $dbc; inside the if (!$dbc) statement so there is one in the if and else statements? – dash Jul 7 '11 at 23:52
  • It does not make sense, when there is no connection you can't return something useful, then better return nothing. Instead of the trigger_error you could also use die() which stops PHP at all. When some error occur with mysqli_connect() you probably don't want to proceed with the script... – powtac Jul 7 '11 at 23:57
  • dosent trigger_error stop the PHP script as well? – dash Jul 7 '11 at 23:58
0

you could make $dbc global inside the function.... as long as both files are included it should work fine

@powtac:

I agree on a per case basis, however if you plan on making a more robust database solution for a large site, having one class object (well named is important) can be a powerful tool. That's not to say you couldn't do the same thing and make the object a static variable inside of a function to prevent a careless developer from overwriting it:)

  • I personally don't like the global DB connector. It can be overwritten in an other script above... – powtac Jul 7 '11 at 23:46
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Since you might be calling getConnection a lot, it makes sense to make it static so that it does not get created more than once. Building on powtac's version:

DEFINE ('DB_USER', 'username');
DEFINE ('DB_PASSWORD', 'password');
DEFINE ('DB_HOST', 'localhost');
DEFINE ('DB_NAME', 'adfg');

function getConnection() {
  static $dbc;

  if (!$dbc) {
      $dbc = mysqli_connect (DB_HOST, DB_USER, DB_PASSWORD, DB_NAME);

      if (!$dbc) {
          trigger_error ('Could not connect to MySQL.', E_USER_ERROR);
      }
  }

  return $dbc;
}

You would then include this file and call getConnection wherever it's convenient.

Apart from making $dbc static so that it's only created once, I also removed the MySql error message when a connection cannot be established (it's generally a good idea to not give out such information if your users might see it; errors on connect at development time are relatively rare and can be debugged easily on the spot). Finally, I left the trigger_error and did not replace it with the more usually seen die because it might be part of your error handling framework. However, I did raise the error severity to signify that an error when attempting to connect should be an immediate show-stopper.

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