87

When I specify text-align:center for an element with a width that is greater than the width of the text, the text is centered within the content box of the element (as expected).

When I specify text-align:center for an element with a width that is less than the width of the text, the text is aligned to the left edge of the content box and overflows the right edge of the content box.

You can see the two cases in action here.

Can any CSS magic make the text equally overflow both the left edge and the right edge of the content box, so that it stays centered?

2
  • Do you need the white-space: nowrap;? If not, the text appears centered.
    – feeela
    Jul 8, 2011 at 0:26
  • 4
    @feeela: I used white-space:nowrap in order to keep the text on a single line, which is the desired behavior. Jul 8, 2011 at 0:27

8 Answers 8

116

I know this question is old, but I just had the same Problem and found a much easier solution with just a span. http://jsfiddle.net/7hy3w2jj/

<div>some text</div>
<div>
    <span class="text-overflow-center">some text that will overflow</span>
</div>

Then you just need this definition

.text-overflow-center {
    margin-left: -100%;
    margin-right: -100%;
    text-align: center;
}

If you can work with pseudo elements, it can be done with no html at all. Just add these definition to your text container. http://jsfiddle.net/7287L9a8/

div:before {
    content: "";
    margin-left: -100%;
}
div:after {
    content: "";
    margin-right: -100%;
}

The only downside to the pseudo variant is that it only works with one line of text.

14
  • 3
    oh thank gods for negative margins! I used -99px instead of % value for a child element that is much smaller than the parent which has variable dimensions and overflow: hidden anyway
    – Aprillion
    Jan 14, 2016 at 12:46
  • 2
    @Aziz probably. But I like to only define properties that I use.
    – Nemo64
    Feb 5, 2016 at 7:13
  • 3
    For MSEdge, if you can use flexbox — then putting display: flex; justify-content: center; on the div works better cross-browser. jsfiddle.net/jfroom/2u5x1hmj/1 @Nemo64 consider an update?
    – jfroom
    Mar 9, 2016 at 23:49
  • 2
    This doesn't work at all, does it? Try making the div 15px wide instead of 100px, and things won't be centered anymore.
    – Clément
    Aug 13, 2016 at 14:08
  • 1
    @Gaurav i think there is no way to achieve this without having all lines overflowing equally, like this: jsfiddle.net/ew52qj7b/1 You could take a look at hyphenation but the browser support isn't that good for automatic hyphenation: caniuse.com/#feat=css-hyphens but depending on the situation you can use &shy; to allow hyphens in a specific spot.
    – Nemo64
    Feb 16, 2017 at 13:48
38

This looks some old question.

Now I think there is some good answer with flex.

You can do this simply like this:

<div id="small_div">overflowing text</div>

#small_div {
    display: flex;
    justify-content: center;
}

That's it.

Hope much help to you!

4
  • Just a heads up. This doesn't work in IE11 and older (even with the autoprefixer).
    – Taylan
    Nov 25, 2018 at 10:14
  • 2
    This should be the accepted answer because it allows multiline overflow centering Mar 1, 2019 at 8:02
  • This is a good starting point but I had to also add text-align: center; to get multiline centering with and also overflowing Feb 10, 2021 at 22:37
  • flex box doesnt center overflowing content for me i still need to add margin-left: -100%; margin-right: -100%;
    – AGrush
    Aug 11 at 13:35
14

Div magic to the rescue. In case anyone is interested, you can see the solution here.

HTML:

<div id="outer">
    <div id="inner">
        <div id="text">some text</div>
    </div>
</div>
<div id="outer">
    <div id="inner">
        <div id="text">some text that will overflow</div>
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

#outer {
    display: block;
    position: relative;
    left: 100px;
    width: 100px;
    border: 1px solid black;
    background-color: silver;
}
#inner {
    /* shrink-to-fit width */
    display: inline-block;
    position: relative;
    /* shift left edge of text to center */
    left: 50%;
}
#text {
    /* shift left edge of text half distance to left */
    margin-left: -50%;
    /* text should all be on one line */
    white-space: nowrap;
}
8
  • 4
    "Div magic to the rescue." Well, and DIV-soup to the rescue too… but a tricky solution
    – feeela
    Jul 8, 2011 at 1:00
  • @feeela: agreed that divs can become a swirling mess, which is why I leave them out of the HTML and build the more complex DOM with JavaScript when the page is loaded. Jul 8, 2011 at 1:02
  • 2
    This might be an option: jsfiddle.net/PdER5. I'm purposely not posting it as answer because it needs to be heavily tested to make sure it doesn't do anything weird when it's used on your actual page in any of the browsers you need to support.
    – thirtydot
    Jul 8, 2011 at 1:07
  • @thirtydot: breaks if the width of the text is more than twice the "random number", though in practice it could be made large enough that it wouldn't be an issue Jul 8, 2011 at 1:10
  • @thirtydot IMHO a cooler solution, but the negative margins aren't "some random number", but the left positioning distance plus half the DIVs width.
    – feeela
    Jul 8, 2011 at 1:11
0

Strange requirement. I would expand the boxes to the texts size.

One possible solution might involve a negative text-indent: text-indent: -50px;, but that won't work for smaller texts (first DIV in your example). No better idea here right now.

1
  • Nice thought with text-indent. It can replace margin-left in my solution with the same result. Jul 8, 2011 at 0:52
0

Try

word-wrap:break-word;

instead of:

white-space:nowrap;

or do you only want it on one line?

7
  • this is an odd requirement. Why do you need it spill out of the element?
    – FraserK
    Jul 8, 2011 at 0:45
  • 1
    The element is effectively a shape, the text a label. I'm trying my hand at making certain kinds of charts with minimal JavaScript. Jul 8, 2011 at 0:47
  • Why not try having the background as an image and then having the image set to no-repeat and centered. for example jsfiddle.net/C4BBS/1 you can see the border shows the actual width of the div but the bg is centered
    – FraserK
    Jul 8, 2011 at 0:56
  • some things like the border are still messy, and some additional code would be required to handle user events on the element. Jul 8, 2011 at 0:59
  • Which events are likely? the borders are not needed but i left them there so you can see that the actual width of the element.
    – FraserK
    Jul 8, 2011 at 1:02
0

this one seems to work: add a wrapper block with position relative and left:50% margin-left:-100% you can see it here Here's the code:

<style>
div {
    display: block;
    position: relative;
    left: 100px;
    height:1.5em;
    width: 100px;
    text-align: center;
    white-space: nowrap;
    border: 1px solid black;
    background-color: silver;
}
span{
    display:block;
    position:relative;
    left:50%;
    margin-left:-100%;
}
</style>
<div><span>some text</span></div>
<div><span>some text that will overflow</span></div>
3
  • Unlucky with the text length, it makes your solution appear to work, until you add more text like I've done here: jsfiddle.net/LSpCS/2
    – thirtydot
    Jul 8, 2011 at 0:56
  • Nice, one less level of nested elements. Jul 8, 2011 at 0:56
  • @thirtydot: bummer, was hoping. I wonder if there's a way to make it work. Jul 8, 2011 at 0:58
0

To make the solution work for multi-line text, you can modify Nathan's solution by changing the #inner left from 50% to 25%.

0

Give the innermost div some margin: 0 -50%. If the elements are all display block or inline-block and text alignment is centered, this provides more shoulder room for the innermost element's text. At least, it works for me.

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