32

I want to retrieve the local variables from Python from a called function. Is there any way to do this? I realize this isn't right for most programming, but I am basically building a debugger. For example:

def show_locals():
  # put something in here that shows local_1.

local_1 = 123
show_locals()  # I want this to show local_1.

What do I put in the body of show_locals? If I have to modify the calling statement, what is the minimal modification I can make?

Note: this must work when show_locals is in a different module to its caller.

65

If you're writing a debugger, you'll want to make heavy use of the inspect module:

def show_callers_locals():
    """Print the local variables in the caller's frame."""
    import inspect
    frame = inspect.currentframe()
    try:
        print(frame.f_back.f_locals)
    finally:
        del frame
  • 1
    nice, looking good. – Peter Jul 8 '11 at 1:05
  • Super helpful. Thanks. – Ivan X Mar 28 '15 at 17:38
  • Yay! I found your solution after running into significant performance issues with an alternative solution: caller = inspect.stack()[1][0]; myvars = caller.f_locals. Your way is MUCH faster. – TheGerm May 2 '16 at 21:58
  • 2
    Why is deleting the frame in the finally block necessary? Is keeping the frame object in memory somehow expensive? This is a minor point, of course, but it left me confused. Also, thank you, this is very helpful! – user21952-is-a-great-name Nov 2 '16 at 3:16
  • 6
    The inspect documentation explains the del frame. – Gareth Rees Nov 2 '16 at 9:15
-3

You use the python builtin, dir() or vars():

vars(object)

For examples using dir(), see: this post

Examples using vars:

>>> class X:
...     a=1
...     def __init__(self):
...         b=2
... 
>>> 
>>> vars(X)
{'a': 1, '__module__': '__main__', '__doc__': None, '__init__': <function __init__ at 0x100488848>}
>>> 
>>> vars(X())
{}

A potentially problematic fact: New style classes not return the same result

>>> class X(object):
...     a=1
...     def __init__(self):
...         b=2
... 
>>> 
>>> vars(X)
<dictproxy object at 0x1004a1910>
>>> vars(X())
{}

Also: for an instantiated class (new and old style), if you add a variable after instantiating, vars will return the object's dict like this:

>>> x = X() 
>>> x.c = 1
>>> vars(x)
{'c': 1}
>>> 

See: http://docs.python.org/library/functions.html#vars

  • 2
    This doesn't answer the question, the OP wants the oppersite where inside of func_1, if you call func_2 you can see all the locals from func_1. – PsyKzz Jul 17 '14 at 18:20

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