4

On powershell core (7.1.2) or 7.2, I don't have the accented french characters "é" or "è" or "à", I have this:

Liste des mises à jours déjà installées dans la dernière mise à jour

It works on powershell windows 5.1. the text is like this:

Liste des mises à jours déjà installées dans la dernière mise à jour

I use the IDE visual studio code in the 2 cases.

Whats is the solution please? I have already tried to change the encoding : utf8 or utf 16 for example with the french language pack

I tried this code for example, but it doesn't work

#affiche la tentative de mise à jour"
function affichetentative {
 
    #nom du serveur
    $b=HOSTNAME.EXE
    #chemin  où  est lecalisé le fichier de log du serveur
    $path="C:\LOGS\log_$b.txt"
    #affichage du texte ci-dessous dans un fichier de log
    $c=Get-Date
    $a="Liste des mises à jours déjà installées dans la dernière mise à jour le {0} " -f  $c
    ADD-content -path $path -Encoding utf8BOM -value  $a  
        
    }
 affichetentative 

I have this output in my file:

Liste des mises à jours déjà installées dans la dernière mise à jour le 16/02/2021 22:13:41

even if i configure utf8BOM or UTF-16LE on visual studio code, it doesn't work

1
  • I'm ok on Windows 10 with that. Maybe this is your terminal\console\font problems? Try printing file with this text to console without powershell (using type or cat)
    – filimonic
    Feb 16, 2021 at 17:56

1 Answer 1

6

The implication is that your file is UTF8-encoded, but without a BOM.

  • Caveat: If you use Add-Content to append to an existing file (that isn't empty), PowerShell matches the (possibly inferred) existing encoding and ignores an -Encoding argument.

While PowerShell (Core) 7+ reads such files correctly, Windows PowerShell does not, because it assumes ANSI encoding in the absence of a BOM; this applies both to files read explicitly with Get-Content and implicitly read source-code files.

Any file you want both PowerShell editions to interpret correctly by default should be UTF8-encoded with a BOM (or UTF16-LE-encoded, which PowerShell calls Unicode, which always has a BOM).

The pitfall is that modern editors such as Visual Studio Code create BOM-less files by default, because UTF8 is assumed to be the default encoding nowadays, and because some utilities, notably those with a Unix heritage, do not expect a BOM and may even misinterpret as data.

  • However, as filimonic points out, you can configure Visual Studio Code to create UTF8 files with BOM by default (optionally just for PowerShell source-code files) - see the docs.

From Windows PowerShell, the problem can be demonstrated as follows:

# Use a .NET API directly to create a test file.
# .NET APIs create BOM-*less* UTF-8 files by default.
[IO.File]::WriteAllText(
  "$PWD/test.txt",
  'Liste des mises à jours déjà installées dans la dernière mise à jour'
)

# Now read it with Get-Content on Windows PowerShell, which
# results in MISINTERPRETATION.
# Note: In PowerShell (Core) 7+, this works correctly.
Get-Content test.txt

You'll get:

Liste des mises à jours déjà installées dans la dernière mise à jour

because the UTF8 encoding was misinterpreted as the active ANSI code page's encoding.

By passing -Encoding utf8 to Get-Content, you could avoid the problem.

5
  • It works for me with the encoding unicode or utf32. Thanks! learn.microsoft.com/en-us/powershell/module/…
    – geekdu972
    Feb 16, 2021 at 18:31
  • Glad to hear it, @geekdu972. Unicode is PowerShell-speak for UTF16-LE, which definitely works (as does UTF32), but note that you'll get much larger files than with UTF8 (with BOM), if the file is primarily composed of ASCII-range characters.
    – mklement0
    Feb 16, 2021 at 18:44
  • @mklement0 When working with files you can use encoding $utf8bom = [System.Text.UTF8Encoding]::new($true) which keeps BOM record [System.IO.File]::WriteAllLines($path, $lines, $utf8bom), [System.IO.File]::WriteAllText($path, $text, $utf8bom)
    – filimonic
    Feb 16, 2021 at 18:50
  • 1
    @filimonic, yes, but if you do want a BOM in PowerShell code, just use -Encoding utf8 in Windows PowerShell, and -Encoding utf8bom in PowerShell (Core) 7+; if you don't want a BOM in Windows PowerShell, you indeed have to use .NET APIs - see this answer and this answer for a cmdlet-like wrapper function. (In PowerShell (Core) 7+ you'll get BOM-less UTF8 by default, consistently across all cmdlets).
    – mklement0
    Feb 16, 2021 at 18:56
  • 1
    Thank you! This is not intuative, I saved my scripts as UTF-8-BOM and my problem was solved Nov 23, 2022 at 16:40

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.