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Let's say I have an

open class Grid<R> {

    private val columns = mutableListOf<Column<R, *>>()

    private val _rows = mutableListOf<Row<R>>()

    val rows: List<Row<R>> get() = _rows.toList()

    ...

    private fun addRow(row: R) {
        val r = Row(row).also {
            columns.forEach { column -> it.addValue(column) }
        }
        _rows.add(r)
    }

    fun addRows(vararg rows: R) {
        rows.forEach { addRow(it) }
        dataHasChanged()
    }

    ...
}

where Row is some wrapper for R that is irrelevant to this discussion.

And now let's say I want to add a

fun replaceRows(newRows: List<R>) {
    _rows.clear()
    addRows(*newRows.toTypedArray())
}

This fails because I

Cannot use 'R' as reified type parameter. Use a class instead.

Fine, let's give this a try...

First, let's keep track of the R class...

open class Grid<R> protected constructor(private val rowType: Class<R>) {
    companion object {
        inline operator fun <reified R> invoke(): Grid<R> {
            return Grid(R::class.java)
        }
    }

    private val columns = mutableListOf<Column<R, *>>()

    private val _rows = mutableListOf<Row<R>>()

    val rows: List<Row<R>> get() = _rows.toList()

    ...

    private fun addRow(row: R) {
        val r = Row(row).also {
            columns.forEach { column -> it.addValue(column) }
        }
        _rows.add(r)
    }

    fun addRows(vararg rows: R) {
        rows.forEach { addRow(it) }
        dataHasChanged()
    }

    fun replaceRows(newRows: List<R>) {
        _rows.clear()
        addRows(*newRows.toTypedArray()) //fails
    }

    ...
}

Now what? How do I pass on the newRows list to the addRows function?

And yes, I am fully aware that I can get around this by creating an overload that takes a list:

    fun addRows(rows : List<R> ){
        rows.forEach { addRow(it) }
        dataHasChanged()
    }

    fun addRows(vararg rows: R) {
        addRows(rows.toList())
    }

    fun replaceRows(newRows: List<R>) {
        _rows.clear()
        addRows(newRows)
    }

which also allows me to get rid of the rowType and the inline operator shenanigans,

I just can't seem to find a good answer on how to actually DO what the error message suggested, and it's bothering me.

Because let's be honest, something like

addRows(*newRows.stream().toArray() as Array<R>)

is just plain ugly.

(Why couldn't the spread operator just work on the lists directly? would've made things so much easier...)

0

1 Answer 1

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This is a limitation due to type erasure, and the fact that Arrays have reified types. Your workaround addRows(*newRows.stream().toArray() as Array<R>) will throw a ClassCastException because Array types are reified, so you can't cast Arrays to Arrays with a different type. stream.toArray() creates an Array<Any>, regardless of the generic type of the Stream, since the type of the stream is erased at runtime.

toTypedArray is an inline function, so it is safe to use because it returns the actual array type matching the type of the input list. But with the safety comes the requirement that the type of the array must be known concretely by the compiler.

Since reification works only at the local function level, it won't help you to call toTypedArray.

The only way I can think of to do this is to use Java reflection to create an Array of the proper type, so you can use a KClass parameter instead of a reified function to create the typed array:

@Suppress("UNCHECKED_CAST")
fun <T: Any> Collection<T>.toTypedArray(type: KClass<T>): Array<T> {
    @Suppress("PLATFORM_CLASS_MAPPED_TO_KOTLIN")
    val thisCollection = this as java.util.Collection<T>
    return thisCollection.toArray(java.lang.reflect.Array.newInstance(type.java, 0) as Array<T>) as Array<T>
}

Then you can use this non-inline version of toTypedArray() within your Grid class that has the row type property:

    fun replaceRows(newRows: List<R>) {
        _rows.clear()
        addRows(*newRows.toTypedArray(rowType))
    }

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