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The JDBC API has the following note related to ResultSet:

A ResultSet object is automatically closed when the Statement object that generated it is closed, re-executed, or used to retrieve the next result from a sequence of multiple results.

In the JDBC 4.3 Specification:

13.1.4 Closing Statement Objects

Closing a Statement object will close and invalidate any instances of ResultSet produced by that Statement object.

At this point it's clear, closing a statement object, should close the ResultSet

The JavaDoc of Statement has this note:

All execution methods in the Statement interface implicitly close a current ResultSet object of the statement if an open one exists.

Now, the question is how should behave Statement.closeOnCompletion()?

Specifies that this Statement will be closed when all its dependent result sets are closed. If execution of the Statement does not produce any result sets, this method has no effect.

Note: ... However, a call to closeOnCompletion does effect both the subsequent execution of statements, and statements that currently have open, dependent, result sets.

The Statement should allow re-executions? or the re-execution should close the statement on the second execution?

To exemplify with a test:

  @Test
  public void testCloseOnCompletionMultipleExecutionResultSets() throws SQLException {
    Statement statement = conn.createStatement();
    ResultSet rs1 = statement.executeQuery("SELECT 1");
    assertFalse("rs1 should be open", rs1.isClosed());

    statement.closeOnCompletion();
    // Should the second execution throw an SQLException with "Statement closed"?
    // or it should work and the statement be closed until the second rs is closed?
    ResultSet rs2 = statement.executeQuery("SELECT 2"); // fail or not?

    assertTrue("rs1 should be closed by rs2", rs1.isClosed());
    assertFalse("rs2 should be open", rs2.isClosed());
    assertFalse("statement should be open", statement.isClosed());
    rs2.close(); // Only close the statement here since is the last rs open.
    assertTrue("statement should be closed", statement.isClosed());
  }

Related discussion: https://github.com/pgjdbc/pgjdbc/pull/1905

3 Answers 3

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With calling closeOnCompletion() you signal that you want the statement to close after you've closed its last result set (which 'completes' the execution), so the statement will close itself once execution completes. For non-result-set producing statements, it has no effect (you should call close() yourself). For result-set-producing statements, execution completes once you close the last result set. The primary use-case for this is when you return a result set for processing, but don't want to keep track of its statement.

Given another execution on the same statement will close any open result set from that statement, having enabled closeOnCompletion, will automatically close the statement as a result.

It would be a user error to signal closeOnCompletion, but then continue to use the statement anyway by executing another statement, so raising a SQLException is appropriate.

As an aside, the text

However, a call to closeOnCompletion does effect both the subsequent execution of statements, and statements that currently have open, dependent, result sets.

means that if you call closeOnCompletion it will affect the next execution that produces a result set, or if you currently have a result set open, the current execution.

This is also supported by the replies in the discussion on jdbc-spec-discuss mailing list by Lance Andersen (JDBC specification leader) and Douglas Surber (JSR-221 JDBC Expert Group member on behalf of Oracle), specifically:

The overall intent was to deal with code similar to:

ResultSet rs = foo();
while(rs.next() {
     /*do something */
}
rs.close();

public ResultSet foo() {

   Statement stmt = con.createStatement();
   stmt.closeOnCompletion();
   ResultSet rs = stmt.executeQuery(aQuery);
   return rs
}

We did spend a lot of time on this back in 2009 and took quite a bit of time to reach agreement on the current wording. However, it does look like there is the potential for some additional word smithing.

(Lance Andersen, https://mail.openjdk.java.net/pipermail/jdbc-spec-discuss/2021-February/000542.html)


I wrote the original proposal. The intent was to handle the case Lance described. It was not intended to allow multiple executions of the Statement. So while the language may not be as clear as it needs to be, the case Filipe described should throw on the second execution of the Statement. At least that was my intent.

(Douglas Surber, https://mail.openjdk.java.net/pipermail/jdbc-spec-discuss/2021-February/000543.html)


As Douglas points out at the time of the discussion, the JDBC EG consensus was the Statement would be closed. If applications did not want this behavior they should not call Statement::closeOnCompletion and if they were not sure if the method had been invoked, they could always call Statement::isCloseOnCompletion to make a decision programatically.

This area as you are aware is messy enough and the intent was to address a common use case which lead to common issues for applications and not further complicate things.

(Lance Andersen, https://mail.openjdk.java.net/pipermail/jdbc-spec-discuss/2021-February/000548.html)


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The answer to you question must be "noYES".

I'm changing my original reply after the clarifications provided by the JDBC Experts.

So, it is true that closeOnCompletion must close the statement regardless of how the result sets have been closed, i.e., either explicitly by the user or implicitly when the statement is used in a subsequent execution, and hence an exception must be thrown.

One question remains to be clarified, though. The method's JavaDoc says:

Specifies that this Statement will be closed when all its dependent result sets are closed. If execution of the Statement does not produce any result sets, this method has no effect.

There are no doubts regarding the first sentence, but the second sentence doesn't quite match the original intent, which is to disallow re-executions with this statement, regardless of whether result sets are/have been produced or not.

This leads us to another corner case: What happens if we call closeOnCompletion() after the statement was executed (one or more times) and there were no result sets from previous execution or all result sets have been closed already? The note in the specification says:

However, a call to closeOnCompletion does effect both the subsequent execution of statements, and statements that currently have open, dependent, result sets.

So, it could either be that the statement is in a "reset" state, like a freshly created one, and it would be possible to execute it one more time; or that it must be closed immediately upon calling closeOnCompletion() as if it were called before the previous execute or before closing the last result set.

I'll add more details about this if additional clarifications are made.

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  • Both implicit and explicit closing of result sets result in a completion. Completion is about statement execution, not intent of the user. I'm not aware of anything in the JDBC specification that supports this interpretation. The comment about toggling is simply to avoid people thinking they can 'cancel' a closeOnCompletion by calling the method again as if it toggles between two states. Feb 17, 2021 at 19:34
  • @MarkRotteveel you are correct. I changed my original reply. Feb 17, 2021 at 23:51
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Sounds like this question is asked from the rather exotic position of 'someone implementing JDBC', and not as a user. Thanks for your efforts on maintaining the postgres JDBC binding :)

@MarkRotteveel gave a lot of context here. There is one more important point, though:

from the javadoc:

from Statement.closeOnCompletion: Specifies that this Statement will be closed when all its dependent result sets are closed.

from Statement.getResultSet: Retrieves the current result as a ResultSet object.

These are seemingly mutually exclusive: One suggests that a single statement can have multiple resultsets active at the same time, the other, as it speaks of the current result, meshes with the javadoc on ResultSet itself (A ResultSet object is automatically closed when the Statement object that generated it is closed, re-executed, or used to retrieve the next result from a sequence of multiple results.) which suggests there can be only at most one resultset.

I'm guessing the second interpretation is the more correct one; it is backed up not just by docs but by method structure (given that there is a getResultSet method which does not return an array of resultsets, even without the docs there is some 'proof' of the notion that there can be only one), and meshes with more javadoc in more places.

However, there is one way to interpret this that avoids having to file a bug with openjdk.org about this conflicting documentation: That JDBC leaves room for implementors to add a custom method that does spin off multiple resultsets, all active, though what this implies about what getResultSet() should return remains a mystery. I'm pretty sure the postgres JDBC driver doesn't have any such methods, which makes it a moot point.

This then leads to a simple conclusion:

If a new resultset is created from a statement that is both marked close on completion and has already created a resultset before, then:

  • The previous resultset must be closed.
  • Then either [A] this then closes the statement, and thus an SQLException must be thrown: Trying to execute a closed statement, --or--
  • [B] Due to the closing of the original resultset being implicit, the statement is not closed, and the newly created ResultSet now has the property of: "If you close me, you close the statement". Calling close() on the old ResultSet should be a no-op, and should not close the statement if this is the chosen route: It is no longer the active resultset and therefore the javadoc is clear that (re-) closing this one has no bearing on the close on completion function.

The docs do not seem clear to me about which one of these two options is correct, but I don't think it matters much: It is either clearly the behaviour the programmer intends (B), or, an exception is inevitable, and the programmer will swiftly be notified that this scenario of spinning multiple resultsets from a close on complete statement is never going to work.

In practice the point is presumably almost entirely moot: Between frameworks like JDBI/JOOQ and try-with-resources, close on complete has only one real useful function: To allow code to return a ResultSet created from a freshly made statement object, and return that, moving the onus of closing it to the caller.

That caller could then do:

resultSet.getStatement().execute(...);

but that would be malicious idiocy: Given that you have no idea what kind of statement it is, you have no idea what you can do with it (plain jane Statement allows execute(String), but PreparedStatement is explicitly specced to instantly throw if you try to call that method. It's sufficiently bizarre that 'just throw' is perfectly fine behaviour.

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  • Your assumptions are incorrect that this is mutually exclusive. Some statements can produce multiple result sets (e.g. stored procedures in SQL Server). You move to the next result set by calling getMoreResults, checking its return value, and then calling getResultSet (or getUpdateCount), until there are no more results. closeOnCompletion will close the statement when the last result set has been retrieved and closed (though more correct would be if the last result was retrieved, because it is entirely possible the last result set is followed by 1 or more update counts). Feb 17, 2021 at 13:12
  • But there is only one 'active' resultset, and advancing to the next result set via e.g. getMoreResults is supposed to close the previous one implicitly as per the rest of the JDBC javadoc, no? i.e. the active one can be open or closed, and all non-active ones must be closed, as the thing that made them non-active implicitly closed them. Feb 17, 2021 at 13:43
  • Hmm, I guess if multiple resultsets would be produced by repeated calls to getMoreResults, the javadoc can then be read as: If you close a ResultSet that is not the last in the sequence, the sourcing statement is NOT closed at all; that only applies to the last ResultSet of the sequence? Feb 17, 2021 at 13:44
  • That is why closeOnCompletion says "when all its dependent result sets are closed.", if a statement execution produces multiple result sets, all those result sets are its "dependent result sets". Also, whether or not previous result sets - from the same execution - are closed depends on the parameter passed to getMoreResults(int), so it is possible - but unusual in my experience - to have multiple result sets open on one statement object. Feb 17, 2021 at 13:47

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