How can I pass anonymous types as parameters to other functions? Consider this example:

var query = from employee in employees select new { Name = employee.Name, Id = employee.Id };
LogEmployees(query);

variable query here doesn't have strong type. How should I define my LogEmployees function to accept it?

public void LogEmployees (? list)
{
    foreach (? item in list)
    {

    }

}

In other words, what should I use instead of ? marks.

10 Answers 10

up vote 138 down vote accepted

I think you should make a class for this anonymous type. That'd be the most sensible thing to do in my opinion. But if you really don't want to, you could use dynamics:

public void LogEmployees (IEnumerable<dynamic> list)
{
    foreach (dynamic item in list)
    {
        string name = item.Name;
        int id = item.Id;
    }
}

Note that this is not strongly typed, so if, for example, Name changes to EmployeeName, you won't know there's a problem until runtime.

  • I checked this as correct answer, because of dynamic usage. I real came handy for me. Thanks :) – Saeed Neamati Jul 9 '11 at 5:10
  • I agree that once data starts being passed around, a more structured way may / should normally be preferred in order to not introduce hard to find bugs (you're sidestepping the type system). However, if you want to find a compromise, another way is to simply pass a generic Dictionary. C# dictionary initializers are pretty convenient to use these days. – Jonas Feb 4 '15 at 10:19
  • There are some cases where you want a generic implementation, and passing hard types means possibly switching or factory implementation which starts to bloat the code. If you have a truly dynamic situation and don't mind a little reflection to deal with the data you're receiving, then this is perfect. Thanks for the answer @Tim S. – Larry Smith Oct 5 '16 at 17:05

You can do it like this:

public void LogEmployees<T>(List<T> list) // Or IEnumerable<T> list
{
    foreach (T item in list)
    {

    }
}

... but you won't get to do much with each item. You could call ToString, but you won't be able to use (say) Name and Id directly.

  • 1
    Except you can use where T : some type at the end of the first line to narrow the type. At that point, though, expecting a certain type of common interface would make more sense to expect an interface. :) – doctorless Jul 8 '11 at 13:10
  • 8
    @d_r_w: You can't use where T : some type with anonymous types though, as they don't implement any kind of interface... – Jon Skeet Jul 8 '11 at 13:11
  • @dlev: You can't do that, foreach requires that the variable iterated on implement GetEnumerator, and anonymous types don't guarantee that. – doctorless Jul 8 '11 at 13:11
  • 1
    @Jon Skeet: good point, my brain is underpowered this morning. – doctorless Jul 8 '11 at 13:12
  • 1
    @JonSkeet. I suppose you could use reflection to still access/set the properties if T is an anonymous type right? I'm thinking of a case where someone writes a "Select * from" statement and uses an anonymous (or defined) class to define which columns from the query result map to the same named properties on your anonymous object. – matrixugly Apr 28 '15 at 14:29

Unfortunately, what you're trying to do is impossible. Under the hood, the query variable is typed to be an IEnumerable of an anonymous type. Anonymous type names cannot be represented in user code hence there is no way to make them an input parameter to a function.

Your best bet is to create a type and use that as the return from the query and then pass it into the function. For example,

struct Data {
  public string ColumnName; 
}

var query = (from name in some.Table
            select new Data { ColumnName = name });
MethodOp(query);
...
MethodOp(IEnumerable<Data> enumerable);

In this case though, you are only selecting a single field, so it may be easier to just select the field directly. This will cause the query to be typed as an IEnumerable of the field type. In this case, column name.

var query = (from name in some.Table select name);  // IEnumerable<string>
  • My example was one, but most of the time it's more. Your answer through works (and quite obvious now). I just needed a break for lunch to think it though ;-) – Tony Trembath-Drake Apr 22 '09 at 5:37
  • FYI: merged from stackoverflow.com/questions/775387/… – Shog9 Nov 22 '13 at 5:14
  • @JaredPar The word 'new' makes the trick happen. Many thanks... – Zaker Aug 13 '15 at 4:19
  • A caveat is that when you create a proper class Equals changes behaviour. I.e. you have to implement it. (I knew of this discrepancy but still managed to forget about it during a refactoring.) – LosManos Oct 19 '16 at 5:56

You can't pass an anonymous type to a non generic function, unless the parameter type is object.

public void LogEmployees (object obj)
{
    var list = obj as IEnumerable(); 
    if (list == null)
       return;

    foreach (var item in list)
    {

    }
}

Anonymous types are intended for short term usage within a method.

From MSDN - Anonymous Types:

You cannot declare a field, a property, an event, or the return type of a method as having an anonymous type. Similarly, you cannot declare a formal parameter of a method, property, constructor, or indexer as having an anonymous type. To pass an anonymous type, or a collection that contains anonymous types, as an argument to a method, you can declare the parameter as type object. However, doing this defeats the purpose of strong typing.

(emphasis mine)


Update

You can use generics to achieve what you want:

public void LogEmployees<T>(IEnumerable<T> list)
{
    foreach (T item in list)
    {

    }
}
  • 2
    If you couldn't pass anonymous types (or collections of an anonymous type) to methods, the whole of LINQ would fail. You can, it's just that the method has to be entirely generic, not using the properties of the anonymous type. – Jon Skeet Jul 8 '11 at 13:06
  • 1
    re object - or dynamic ;p – Marc Gravell Jul 8 '11 at 13:10
  • If casting with "as" you should check if list is null – Alex Jul 8 '11 at 13:11
  • "can" != "have to". Using object is not the same as making a method generic in the anonymous type, as per my answer. – Jon Skeet Jul 8 '11 at 13:13

Normally, you do this with generics, for example:

MapEntToObj<T>(IQueryable<T> query) {...}

The compiler should then infer the T when you call MapEntToObj(query). Not quite sure what you want to do inside the method, so I can't tell whether this is useful... the problem is that inside MapEntToObj you still can't name the T - you can either:

  • call other generic methods with T
  • use reflection on T to do things

but other than that, it is quite hard to manipulate anonymous types - not least because they are immutable ;-p

Another trick (when extracting data) is to also pass a selector - i.e. something like:

Foo<TSource, TValue>(IEnumerable<TSource> source,
        Func<TSource,string> name) {
    foreach(TSource item in source) Console.WriteLine(name(item));
}
...
Foo(query, x=>x.Title);

You can use generics with the following trick (casting to anonymous type):

public void LogEmployees<T>(IEnumerable<T> list)
{
    foreach (T item in list)
    {
        var typedItem = Cast(item, new { Name = "", Id = 0 });
        // now you can use typedItem.Name, etc.
    }
}

static T Cast<T>(object obj, T type)
{
    return (T)obj;
}

"dynamic" can also be used for this purpose.

var anonymousType = new { Id = 1, Name = "A" };

var anonymousTypes = new[] { new { Id = 1, Name = "A" }, new { Id = 2, Name = "B" };

private void DisplayAnonymousType(dynamic anonymousType)
{
}

private void DisplayAnonymousTypes(IEnumerable<dynamic> anonymousTypes)
{
   foreach (var info in anonymousTypes)
   {

   }
}
  • 1
    This is the right answer! It just needs more love :) – Korayem Jun 7 '16 at 0:15

Instead of passing an anonymous type, pass a List of a dynamic type:

  1. var dynamicResult = anonymousQueryResult.ToList<dynamic>();
  2. Method signature: DoSomething(List<dynamic> _dynamicResult)
  3. Call method: DoSomething(dynamicResult);
  4. done.

Thanks to Petar Ivanov!

If you know, that your results implements a certain interface you could use the interface as datatype:

public void LogEmployees<T>(IEnumerable<T> list)
{
    foreach (T item in list)
    {

    }
}

I would use IEnumerable<object> as type for the argument. However not a great gain for the unavoidable explicit cast. Cheers

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