8

Can't seem to find an answer to this, say I have this:

setInterval(function() {
    m = Math.floor(Math.random()*7);
    $('.foo:nth-of-type('+m+')').fadeIn(300);
}, 300);

How do I make it so that random number doesn't repeat itself. For example if the random number is 2, I don't want 2 to come out again.

  • Don't come again at all or only for the next time? – Gedrox Jul 8 '11 at 14:06
  • @Gedrox Not sure I follow you? – daryl Jul 8 '11 at 14:08
  • Is it OK to receive numbers 2 > 4 > 2 > 4 or you don't want it? – Gedrox Jul 8 '11 at 14:10
  • 1
    So what you actually want is not a random number, but a sequence of numbers in a random order? That is quite a different thing. Tskuzzy seems to have the right idea on this. – Schroedingers Cat Jul 8 '11 at 14:38
  • 1
    Just create a pool of numbers as array and take by one out of it till it's empty. – Gedrox Jul 8 '11 at 14:49

10 Answers 10

11

There are a number of ways you could achieve this.

Solution A: If the range of numbers isn't large (let's say less than 10), you could just keep track of the numbers you've already generated. Then if you generate a duplicate, discard it and generate another number.

Solution B: Pre-generate the random numbers, store them into an array and then go through the array. You could accomplish this by taking the numbers 1,2,...,n and then shuffle them.

shuffle = function(o) {
    for(var j, x, i = o.length; i; j = parseInt(Math.random() * i), x = o[--i], o[i] = o[j], o[j] = x);
    return o;
};

var randorder = shuffle([0,1,2,3,4,5,6]);
var index = 0;

setInterval(function() {
    $('.foo:nth-of-type('+(randorder[index++])+')').fadeIn(300);
}, 300);

Solution C: Keep track of the numbers available in an array. Randomly pick a number. Remove number from said array.

var randnums = [0,1,2,3,4,5,6];

setInterval(function() {
    var m = Math.floor(Math.random()*randnums.length);
    $('.foo:nth-of-type('+(randnums[m])+')').fadeIn(300);
    randnums = randnums.splice(m,1);
}, 300);
| improve this answer | |
  • +1. I fixed an apparent bug in Solution B (changed index++ to randorder[index++]); hope it's ok. – ShreevatsaR Jul 8 '11 at 14:34
  • Thanks, wrote these quickly on the spot :) – tskuzzy Jul 8 '11 at 14:35
  • 2
    Did you copy the shuffle() function described in the link I gave? snippets.dzone.com/posts/show/849 . shuffle() isn't a standard javascript function. :) – tskuzzy Jul 8 '11 at 14:58
  • @tskuzzy - Bang on man, thank you so much! I'm going to do a lot more research on these answers later. No point asking and relying on other people, you get no where like that. Thanks! – daryl Jul 8 '11 at 15:03
  • Please, don't recommend solution A ever. It is prone to huge performance drops when there's few "unused" numbers and you're looping obscene amount of retries until math.random stumbles on one of them. – Oleg V. Volkov Sep 21 '13 at 12:41
3

You seem to want a non-repeating random number from 0 to 6, so similar to tskuzzy's answer:

var getRand = (function() {
    var nums = [0,1,2,3,4,5,6];
    var current = [];
    function rand(n) {
        return (Math.random() * n)|0;
    }
    return function() {
      if (!current.length) current = nums.slice();
      return current.splice(rand(current.length), 1);
    }
}());

It will return the numbers 0 to 6 in random order. When each has been drawn once, it will start again.

| improve this answer | |
1

could you try that,

setInterval(function() {
    m = Math.floor(Math.random()*7);
    $('.foo:nth-of-type(' + m + ')').fadeIn(300);
}, 300);
| improve this answer | |
  • Nah that wont work, that was my error in my example question sorry. That's actually what I meant to put in the question. – daryl Jul 8 '11 at 14:07
1

I like Neal's answer although this is begging for some recursion. Here it is in java, you'll still get the general idea. Note that you'll hit an infinite loop if you pull out more numbers than MAX, I could have fixed that but left it as is for clarity.

edit: saw neal added a while loop so that works great.

public class RandCheck {
    private List<Integer> numbers;
    private Random rand;
    private int MAX = 100;

    public RandCheck(){
        numbers = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        rand = new Random();
    }

    public int getRandomNum(){
        return getRandomNumRecursive(getRand());
    }

    private int getRandomNumRecursive(int num){
        if(numbers.contains(num)){
            return getRandomNumRecursive(getRand());
        } else {
            return num;
        }
    }

    private int getRand(){
        return rand.nextInt(MAX);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args){
        RandCheck randCheck = new RandCheck();

        for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++){
            System.out.println(randCheck.getRandomNum());
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Sorry, but your code is in Java. The question is asking about Javascript. Anyways, +1 for the effort :) – Jack Giffin Feb 17 '19 at 16:37
0

Generally my approach is to make an array containing all of the possible values and to:

  1. Pick a random number <= the size of the array
  2. Remove the chosen element from the array
  3. Repeat steps 1-2 until the array is empty

The resulting set of numbers will contain all of your indices without repetition.

Even better, maybe something like this:

var numArray = [0,1,2,3,4,5,6];
numArray.shuffle();

Then just go through the items because shuffle will have randomized them and pop them off one at a time.

| improve this answer | |
  • Well I'm proper stuck, I haven't dealt with array's in jquery before. :~| – daryl Jul 8 '11 at 14:23
  • The code you're using to call JQuery functions is already JavaScript, and this is just a JavaScript array. You can do it! – aardvarkk Jul 8 '11 at 14:26
0

Here's a simple fix, if a little rudimentary:

if(nextNum == lastNum){
    if (nextNum == 0){nextNum = 7;} 
    else {nextNum = nextNum-1;}
}

If the next number is the same as the last simply minus 1 unless the number is 0 (zero) and set it to any other number within your set (I chose 7, the highest index).

I used this method within the cycle function because the only stipulation on selecting a number was that is musn't be the same as the last one.

Not the most elegant or technically gifted solution, but it works :)

| improve this answer | |
0

Use sets. They were introduced to the specification in ES6. A set is a data structure that represents a collection of unique values, so it cannot include any duplicate values. I needed 6 random, non-repeatable numbers ranging from 1-49. I started with creating a longer set with around 30 digits (if the values repeat the set will have less elements), converted the set to array and then sliced it's first 6 elements. Easy peasy. Set.length is by default undefined and it's useless that's why it's easier to convert it to an array if you need specific length.

let randomSet = new Set();
for (let index = 0; index < 30; index++) {
        randomSet.add(Math.floor(Math.random() * 49) + 1) 
    };
let randomSetToArray = Array.from(randomSet).slice(0,6);
console.log(randomSet);
console.log(randomSetToArray);
| improve this answer | |
0

An easy way to generate a list of different numbers, no matter the size or number:

     function randomNumber(max) {
          return Math.floor(Math.random() * max + 1);
        }
        
        const list = []
        while(list.length < 10 ){
            let nbr = randomNumber(500)
            if(!list.find(el => el === nbr)) list.push(nbr) 
        }
        
        console.log("list",list)

| improve this answer | |
0

I would like to add--

var RecordKeeper = {};

SRandom = function () {
    currTimeStamp = new Date().getTime();
    if (RecordKeeper.hasOwnProperty(currTimeStamp)) {
        RecordKeeper[currTimeStamp] = RecordKeeper[currTimeStamp] + 1;
        return currTimeStamp.toString() + RecordKeeper[currTimeStamp];
    }
    else {
        RecordKeeper[currTimeStamp] = 1;
        return currTimeStamp.toString() + RecordKeeper[currTimeStamp];
    }
}

This uses timestamp (every millisecond) to always generate a unique number.

| improve this answer | |
-1

you can do this. Have a public array of keys that you have used and check against them with this function:

function in_array(needle, haystack)
{
    for(var key in haystack)
    {
        if(needle === haystack[key])
        {
            return true;
        }
    }

    return false;
}

(function from: javascript function inArray)

So what you can do is:

var done = [];
setInterval(function() {
    var m = null;
    while(m == null || in_array(m, done)){
       m = Math.floor(Math.random()*7);
    }
    done.push(m);
    $('.foo:nth-of-type('+m+')').fadeIn(300);
}, 300);

This code will get stuck after getting all seven numbers so you need to make sure it exists after it fins them all.

| improve this answer | |
  • Surely that while loop will never execute, as you set m=null and one of the loop conditions is m != null, or am I missing something? – Jack Franklin Jul 8 '11 at 14:06
  • there's already an inArray() built into jQuery – ianbarker Jul 8 '11 at 14:06
  • @JackFranklin, sorry i typed fast, i fixed it – Naftali aka Neal Jul 8 '11 at 14:07
  • @Stefan, prob wants some delays... yes yes, i forgot abt jQuery's inArray it is used the same way as in my example. – Naftali aka Neal Jul 8 '11 at 14:08
  • Total overkill. All you need is done={}; and replace your in_array method with a simple m in done, and instead of .push() use done[m]=1; I didn't downvote though, this still is the only working solution. – davin Jul 8 '11 at 14:08

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