13
template<typename T>
struct A
{
    A<T> operator%( const T& x);
};

template<typename T>
A<T> A<T>::operator%( const T& x ) { ... }

How can I use enable_if to make the following specialization happen for any floating point type (is_floating_point)?

template<>
A<float> A<float>::operator%( const float& x ) { ... }

EDIT: Here's an answer I came up which is different from the ones posted below...

template<typename T>
struct A
{
    T x;

    A( const T& _x ) : x(_x) {}

    template<typename Q>
    typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<Q, T>::value && std::is_floating_point<Q>::value, A<T> >::type operator% ( const Q& right ) const
    {
        return A<T>(fmod(x, right));
    }

    template<typename Q>
    typename std::enable_if<std::is_convertible<Q, T>::value && !std::is_floating_point<Q>::value, A<T> >::type operator% ( const Q& right ) const
    {
        return A<T>(x%right);
    }
};

Like the below posters say, using enable_if may not be ideal for this problem (it's very difficult to read)

0
32

Use overloading instead of explicit specialization when you want to refine the behavior for a more specific parameter type. It's easier to use (less surprises) and more powerful

template<typename T>
struct A
{
    A<T> operator%( const T& x) { 
      return opModIml(x, std::is_floating_point<T>()); 
    }

    A<T> opModImpl(T const& x, std::false_type) { /* ... */ }
    A<T> opModImpl(T const& x, std::true_type) { /* ... */ }
};

An example that uses SFINAE (enable_if) as you seem to be curious

template<typename T>
struct A
{
    A<T> operator%( const T& x) { 
      return opModIml(x); 
    }

    template<typename U, 
             typename = typename 
               std::enable_if<!std::is_floating_point<U>::value>::type>
    A<T> opModImpl(U const& x) { /* ... */ }

    template<typename U, 
             typename = typename 
               std::enable_if<std::is_floating_point<U>::value>::type>
    A<T> opModImpl(U const& x) { /* ... */ }
};

Way more ugly of course. There's no reason to use enable_if here, I think. It's overkill.

14
  • I appreciate the answer and I do like your solution, but I don't agree with why you think template specialization is wrong. If it is possible to specialize for multiple types using enable_if I would still like to know how
    – David
    Jul 8 '11 at 17:36
  • @Dave because you can use overloading instead. Where you have a parameter and you want to specialize for parameter types, overloading is better. No you cannot "specialize with enable_if". What you mean is overloading. I'm going to add an example that overloads and uses SFINAE. Jul 8 '11 at 17:37
  • This may sound stupid but I don't like opModImpl being there, even if it's private. Also I don't like the idea of potentially having an extra temporary created there, even though the optimizer should get rid of it. C++0x should have just included a way to have multiple specializations use the same definition in the first place
    – David
    Jul 8 '11 at 17:41
  • 1
    @Dave : Every library I'm aware of that makes significant use of TMP uses this exact technique over SFINAE solutions whenever possible. I.e., your misgivings are unwarranted. ;-]
    – ildjarn
    Jul 8 '11 at 17:42
  • 5
    @Johannes Your enable_if solution doesn't compile for me... error C4519: default template arguments are only allowed on a class template error C2535: 'A<T> A<T>::opModImpl(const U &)' : member function already defined or declared
    – David
    Jul 8 '11 at 17:55
5

You can also use a default boolean template parameter like this:

template<typename T>
struct A
{
    T x;

    A( const T& _x ) : x(_x) {}

    template<bool EnableBool = true>
    typename std::enable_if<std::is_floating_point<T>::value && EnableBool, A<T> >::type 
    operator% ( const T& right ) const
    {
        return A<T>(fmod(x, right));
    }

    template<bool EnableBool = true>
    typename std::enable_if<!std::is_floating_point<T>::value && EnableBool, A<T> >::type 
    operator% ( const T& right ) const
    {
        return A<T>(x%right);
    }
};
3

With C++20

You can achieve that simply by adding requires to restrict the relevant template function:

template<typename Q> // the generic case, no restriction
A<T> operator% ( const Q& right ) const {
    return A<T>(std::fmod(x, right));
}

template<typename Q> requires std::is_integral_v<T> && std::is_integral_v<Q>
A<T> operator% ( const Q& right ) const {
    return A<T>(x % right);
}

The requires clause gets a constant expression that evaluates to true or false deciding thus whether to consider this method in the overload resolution, if the requires clause is true the method is preferred over another one that has no requires clause, as it is more specialized.

Code: https://godbolt.org/z/SkuvR9

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