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I want to join various nodes of a tree, making sure the the returned root-to-leaf path is temporally valid. The tricky part is that the data source is dated with validity from-to dates.

ID NVALUE VFROM VTO
1 A 2021-01-01 2021-01-31
1 B 2021-02-01 2021-02-28
2 C 2021-01-01 2021-02-28
3 D 2021-01-01 2021-01-31
3 E 2021-02-01 2021-02-28

the links are trivially pointing to the node ids (but not their dates!)

LINK_CHILD LINK_PARENT
1 2
2 3

from this I would like to return the valid paths and their validity dates:

  1. A-C-D valid from 2021-01-01 to 2021-01-31
  2. B-C-E valid from 2021-02-01 to 2021-02-28

invalid paths (e.g. A-C-E should not be returned, since there is no moment in time in which all the three nodes are valid).

The issue I have with this is that the "overlap" check is not transitive (so A overlaps with B and B overlaps with C does not imply that A overlaps with C). So when writing the connect by query each level overlaps with the next, but the resulting global path is invalid.

the basic query set up I have is

with src_nodes (id, nvalue, vfrom, vto) as (
    select 1, 'A', date '2021-01-01', date '2021-01-31' from dual union all
    select 1, 'B', date '2021-02-01', date '2021-02-28' from dual union all
    select 2, 'C', date '2021-01-01', date '2021-02-28' from dual union all
    select 3, 'D', date '2021-01-01', date '2021-01-31' from dual union all
    select 3, 'E', date '2021-02-01', date '2021-02-28'
    from dual
),
     src_links(link_child, link_parent) as (
         select 1, 2 from dual union all
         select 2, 3 from dual
     ),
     full_links as (
         select c.*
         from src_links c
         union
         select null, link_child
         from src_links a
         where not exists(select null from src_links b where b.link_parent = a.link_child)
     ),
     nodes_and_links as (
         select *
         from full_links a
                  join src_nodes n on n.id = a.link_parent)
select *
from nodes_and_links nl
start with nl.link_child is null
connect by prior nl.link_parent = nl.link_child and
           greatest(prior nl.vfrom, nl.vfrom) < 
           least(prior nl.vto, nl.vto)
0
1

I've been having a play with this. It's an interesting one! What I came up with uses all your CTEs and replaces the final SELECT with the following:

hierarchy AS (
     SELECT
         SYS_CONNECT_BY_PATH(nl.NVALUE,'-')||'-' AS Path,
         nl.*
     FROM nodes_and_links nl
          --remove the following line to get all valid paths, not necessarily beginning "at the top"
          START WITH nl.link_child IS NULL
          CONNECT BY PRIOR nl.link_parent = nl.link_child
    )
    
SELECT
    h1.Path,
    MAX(h2.VFROM) AS VFROM,
    MIN(h2.VTO) AS VTO
FROM
    hierarchy h1
    INNER JOIN hierarchy h2 ON h1.Path like ('%' || h2.Path || '%')
WHERE
  --This where clause ensures you get only cases where there is no further child record to be had.
    NOT EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM src_links sr WHERE sr.link_child  = h1.id)
GROUP BY
    h1.Path
HAVING
    MAX(h2.VFROM) <= MIN(h2.VTO)

I'm not going to claim that there aren't better ways to do it, there may well be, but this seems to work.

1
  • nice idea the self join on the hierarchy. maybe we can do better avoiding the string matching on the path, by using the root and the level ... let me try – user103716 Feb 19 at 16:04
1

Here's one way. Efficiency can probably be improved a bit, but first make sure it works as expected with your real-life data.

with
  src_nodes (id, nvalue, vfrom, vto) as (
    select 1, 'A', date '2021-01-01', date '2021-01-31' from dual union all
    select 1, 'B', date '2021-02-01', date '2021-02-28' from dual union all
    select 2, 'C', date '2021-01-01', date '2021-02-28' from dual union all
    select 3, 'D', date '2021-01-01', date '2021-01-31' from dual union all
    select 3, 'E', date '2021-02-01', date '2021-02-28' from dual
  )
, src_links (link_child, link_parent) as (
    select 1, 2 from dual union all
    select 2, 3 from dual
  )
, vdates (vfrom, vmax) as (
    select distinct vfrom, max(vto) over ()
    from   src_nodes
  )
, w (vfrom, vto) as (
    select vfrom, nvl(lead(vfrom) over (order by vfrom) - 1, vmax)
    from   vdates
  )
, vlinks (n_child, n_parent, vfrom, vto) as (
    select sn1.nvalue, sn2.nvalue, w.vfrom, w.vto
    from   src_links sl cross join w
           join src_nodes sn1 on sl.link_child  = sn1.id 
                and w.vfrom >= sn1.vfrom and w.vto <= sn1.vto
           join src_nodes sn2 on sl.link_parent = sn2.id
                and w.vfrom >= sn2.vfrom and w.vto <= sn2.vto
  )
select  connect_by_root(n_child) || sys_connect_by_path(n_parent, ' - ') as pth,
        vfrom, vto
from    vlinks
where   connect_by_isleaf = 1
start   with n_child not in (select n_parent from vlinks)
connect by n_child = prior n_parent and prior vfrom = vfrom
;

PTH             VFROM      VTO       
--------------- ---------- ----------
A - C - D       2021-01-01 2021-01-31
B - C - E       2021-02-01 2021-02-28
2
  • this is good. I like that you generate all the intervals with vfrom, nvl(lead(vfrom) over (order by vfrom) - 1, vmax) and then use them to generate the branches. I think this works, but the only problem is that the only intervals needed are the ones in a particular tree, while this generates all the possible intervals from all the possible nodes (even nodes that are not in the same tree). In my real data I have lots of different trees and intervals. I will try to adapt this to my case. – user103716 Feb 21 at 8:27
  • @user103716 - Analytic functions can also accept a partition by clause. I didn't need to use that for your sample data, since there was only one tree - you never mentioned more than one in your question. I would have to test it, but I believe if you can assign distinct identifiers to trees, you can partition by those identifiers in the lead() function, add the identifiers to connect by, and the rest should work as-is. – mathguy Feb 21 at 14:17
0

I believe this is the most efficient way. One recursive with query and another trivial query to get the leaves.

here's an example with a more complex data source:

dbfiddle

with src_nodes as (
    select 1 id, 'A' nvalue, date '2021-01-01' vfrom, date '2021-02-10' vto
    from dual
    union all
    select 1, 'B', date '2021-02-15', date '2021-02-28'
    from dual
    union all
    select 2, 'C', date '2021-01-01', date '2021-01-31'
    from dual
    union all
    select 2, 'D', date '2021-02-01', date '2021-02-28'
    from dual
    union all
    select 3, 'E', date '2021-01-01', date '2021-02-28'
    from dual
    union all
    select 4, 'F', date '2021-01-01', date '2021-01-31'
    from dual
    union all
    select 4, 'G', date '2021-02-01', date '2021-02-28'
    from dual
    union all
    select 5, 'H', date '2021-02-01', date '2021-02-28'
    from dual
    union all
    select 6, 'I', date '2021-02-10', date '2021-02-28'
    from dual

),
     src_links as (
         select 1 link_child, 2 link_parent
         from dual
         union all
         select 2, 3
         from dual
         union all
         select 3, 4
         from dual
         union all
         select 5, 6
         from dual
     ),
     -- use "recursive with" method instead of "connect by" to be able to
     -- refine the validity dates as we walk the tree
     hier (id, vfrom, vto, nvalue, lvl, root_id, tpath) as (
         select sn.id, sn.vfrom, sn.vto, sn.nvalue, 1 lvl, sn.id, sn.nvalue || ''
         from src_nodes sn
         where -- start with nodes that have no incoming parent link
             exists(select null from src_links a where a.link_child = sn.id)
           and not exists(select null from src_links a where a.link_parent = sn.id)
         union all
         select sn.id,
                greatest(sn.vfrom, hier.vfrom),
                least(sn.vto, hier.vto),
                sn.nvalue,
                hier.lvl + 1 lvl,
                hier.root_id,
                hier.tpath || '-' || sn.nvalue
         from hier
                  join src_links ln on ln.link_child = hier.id
                  join src_nodes sn on sn.id = ln.link_parent --
             and greatest(sn.vfrom, hier.vfrom) < least(sn.vto, hier.vto)
     ) -- use "depth first" to be able to detect leaf nodes
         search depth first by id set seq,
     hier_leaves as (
         select *
         from (
                  select a.*,
                         -- a difference of one means it's a normal 'depth first' step. otherwise it's a leaf
                         (case lead(a.lvl) over (order by a.seq) - a.lvl
                              when 1 then 'inner'
                              else 'leaf' end) path_type
                  from hier a)
         where path_type = 'leaf')
select hl.tpath, hl.vfrom, hl.vto
from hier_leaves hl;

I have now tested this approach against our data which have 300K nodes and 240K links, and the trees (plus some additional pivoting) are parsed in 6 seconds. Similar work was done in 10 minutes by the ETLs.

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