1

I am trying to extend an existing query by aggregating some rows from another table. It works when I only return one column like this:

Select DISTINCT 
   Contracts.id, 
   Contracts.beginTime, 
   Contracts.endTime, 
   Suppliers.name
   (SELECT COUNT(p.id) from production as p where p.id_contract = Contracts.id)
FROM Contracts 
LEFT JOIN Suppliers on Contracts.id = Suppliers.id_contract

Then I tried to add another column for the aggregated volume:

Select DISTINCT 
   Contracts.id, 
   Contracts.beginTime, 
   Contracts.endTime, 
   Suppliers.name
   (SELECT COUNT(p.id), SUM(p.volume) from production as p where p.id_contract = Contracts.id)
FROM Contracts 
LEFT JOIN Suppliers on Contracts.id = Suppliers.id_contract

However, this returns the following error:

Only one expression can be specified in the select list when the subquery is not introduced with EXISTS.

I experimented a bit with the EXISTS keyword, but couldn't figure out how to make it work. Also I'm not sure whether this is the way to go in my case.

The desired output would be like so:

contract1Id, supplierInfoContract1, nrItemsContract1, sumVolumeContract1
contract2Id, supplierInfoContract2, nrItemsContract2, sumVolumeContract2
3
  • exists is a subquery where you join a parent table with a child table in the subquery. It returns true if there are results in the subquery. What is your desired output? – Golden Lion Feb 21 at 18:33
  • Added the desired output. I hope it is clear – Gievkeks Feb 21 at 18:44
  • your code needs two subqueries each one return only one result then the error message will not occur. The error message is telling you that your subquery is returning two results for one variable. – Golden Lion Feb 22 at 11:57
3

Instead of using DISTINCT and subqueries, use GROUP BY and normal joins to get the aggregates. And always use aliases, it will make your life easier:

SELECT
    c.id,
    c.beginTime,
    c.endTime,
    s.name,
    COUNT(p.id) prod_count,
    SUM(p.volume) prod_vol
FROM Contracts c
LEFT JOIN production p on p.id_contract = c.id
LEFT JOIN Suppliers s on c.id = s.id_contract
GROUP BY c.id, c.beginTime, c.endTime, s.name;

Another option is to APPLY the grouped up subquery:

SELECT DISTINCT
    c.id,
    c.beginTime,
    c.endTime,
    s.name,
    p.prod_count,
    p.prod_vol
FROM Contracts c
LEFT JOIN Suppliers s on c.id = s.id_contract
OUTER APPLY (
    SELECT
        COUNT(p.id) prod_count,
        SUM(p.volume) prod_vol
    FROM production p WHERE p.id_contract = c.id
    GROUP BY ()
) p;

You can also use CROSS APPLY and leave out the GROUP BY (), this uses a scalar aggregate and returns 0 instead of null for no rows.

One last point: DISTINCT in a joined query is a bit of a code smell, it usually indicates the query writer wasn't thinking too hard about what the joined tables returned, and just wanted to get rid of duplicate rows.

3
  • Actually, the existing query is much bigger then my example, and the select contains about 20 columns. So I may need to add all of those to the group by clause. Not very elegant, but I will try it. – Gievkeks Feb 21 at 18:49
  • Have updated with another option that may work better for you – Charlieface Feb 21 at 18:55
  • Thanks, the second option works perfectly fine. We use a self-written C++ library to generate our queries, which only supports a simple query structure and the second option works fine with it too. Actually I removed the DISTINCT keyword, as it wasn't necessary. – Gievkeks Feb 21 at 19:24
0

You should use it like below:

Select DISTINCT Contracts.id, Contracts.beginTime, Contracts.endTime, Suppliers.name
(SELECT COUNT(p.id) from production as p where p.id_contract = Contracts.id) as CNT,
(SELECT SUM(p.volume) from production as p where p.id_contract = Contracts.id) as VOLUME
FROM Contracts 
LEFT JOIN Suppliers on Contracts.id = Suppliers.id_contract
2
  • I was thinking about that, but I may want to add multiple additional aggregated columns in the future. I guess this would be very inefficient, as the table will also get big over time. – Gievkeks Feb 21 at 18:46
  • Yeah if you have too many aggregated columns, then reply by CharlieFace will be ideal. Ensure to have proper primary key, indexes and where condition in place while applying joins to larger tables. – Hardik Shah Feb 21 at 18:49
0

I guess you can try to rework your query as

 SELECT X.ID,X.beginTime,X.endTime,X.name,CR.CNTT,CR.TOTAL_VOLUME
 FROM
 (
     Select DISTINCT Contracts.id, Contracts.beginTime, Contracts.endTime,      Suppliers.name
     FROM Contracts 
     LEFT JOIN Suppliers on Contracts.id = Suppliers.id_contract
 )X
 CROSS APPLY
 (
   SELECT COUNT(p.id)AS CNTT,SUM(p.volume) AS TOTAL_VOLUME
   from production as p where p.id_contract = X.id
 )CR
0

I reworked you query slightly by separating the subqueries.

Select DISTINCT 
   Contracts.id, 
   Contracts.beginTime, 
   Contracts.endTime, 
   Suppliers.name,
   (SELECT COUNT(p.id) from production as p where p.id_contract = Contracts.id) count_id,
    (SELECT SUM(p.volume) from production as p where p.id_contract = Contracts.id) sum_volume
FROM Contracts 
LEFT JOIN Suppliers on Contracts.id = Suppliers.id_contract

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