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I am a complete beginner at Haskell and got stuck at this. I want to write a function that returns True if all 3 arguments are different from each other and give False if they are similar.

threeArguments :: Int -> Int -> Int -> Bool
threeArguments a b c = if  a /= b && a /= c && b /= c 
    then return true 
    else return False

But I get error saying

• Couldn't match expected type ‘Bool’ with actual type ‘m0 a0’

enter image description here

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    The code in your screenshot does not match the code in your post. – Micha Wiedenmann Feb 22 at 9:34
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The return function is not needed (in fact, you must not use it) here. It has a different meaning in Haskell than in most other languages -- presumably you will get to that bit of your tutorial a bit later.

threeArguments a b c = if a /= b && a /= c && b /= c
    then True
    else False

(I assume the true instead of True in your question was just a transcription error.)

As an aside, the if foo then True else False is a really common beginner antipattern. Just use foo instead.

threeArguments a b c = a /= b && a /= c && b /= c

And, just for fun, there are other ways of implementing this. For example, you might like

threeArguments a b c = nub [a,b,c] == [a,b,c]

for its brevity and easy generalization to additional arguments.

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  • Thanks for the detailed answer. I'm getting parse error on input "then", am I missing something? – buzzyso Feb 22 at 1:24
  • @buzzyso You would have to show us your exact code for us to be sure, but without seeing it my crystal ball says you have not indented the then more than the threeArguments. – Daniel Wagner Feb 22 at 1:27
  • I have added a picture above now. I did indent it more than threeArguments , I really don't know what the problem is. – buzzyso Feb 22 at 1:32
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    @buzzyso There is no if...? – Daniel Wagner Feb 22 at 1:34
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    @buzzyso Yes, that is suggesting the refactor I did, namely, changing if foo then True else False to foo. You can't just remove the if keyword -- you have to remove the then True else False part, too. – Daniel Wagner Feb 22 at 2:02
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return is a function in Haskell, part of Monad (documentation). It’s not used any time you need to define a function’s value like it would be in some other languages. If you wanted your function to always produce True, for example, you would write it like this:

threeArguments :: Int -> Int -> Int -> Bool
threeArguments a b c = True

True is a Bool value, and there’s no return involved. Likewise, the form of if is if condition then trueValue else falseValue, where condition is a Bool and the overall if expression has the same type as trueValue and falseValue, so you’re looking for:

threeArguments :: Int -> Int -> Int -> Bool
threeArguments a b c = if a /= b && a /= c && b /= c 
    then True 
    else False

But if condition then True else False is redundant, because it has the same value as condition.

threeArguments :: Int -> Int -> Int -> Bool
threeArguments a b c = a /= b && a /= c && b /= c

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