67

How can I convert a string like 123,456.908 to float 123456.908 in Python?

  • 6
    The proper way to do this is to use the locale module - everything else is just a very nasty hack that will get you into trouble in the future. – Nick Bastin Jul 9 '11 at 9:30
100

Just remove the , with replace():

float("123,456.908".replace(',',''))
  • 12
    this depends on locale. 9 988 776,65 € in France 9.988.776,65 € in Germany $9,988,776.65 in the United States – Alexandru R Dec 29 '16 at 19:58
  • If you are writing constants in the source code and want to use commas to make it more readable then this is the way to go rather than locale which would then make the code fail in another location. python cd_size = float("737,280,000".replace(',','')) (I actually used int) – hum3 Jun 1 '18 at 11:30
  • If you are writing a string literal constant in the source code and then explicitly converting it to integer or float, that's a sign of something wrong with the design. But even if it can be defended - just temporarily set the locale to the one the code is written in, for that context, and then restore the context appropriate to your users when handling user input. That's why there is setlocale in the first place. – Karl Knechtel Oct 11 at 22:56
  • do not do this, it allows for things like "123,,,,345" – amohr Nov 19 at 22:26
127

... Or instead of treating the commas as garbage to be filtered out, we could treat the overall string as a localized formatting of the float, and use the localization services:

from locale import atof, setlocale, LC_NUMERIC
setlocale(LC_NUMERIC, '') # set to your default locale; for me this is
# 'English_Canada.1252'. Or you could explicitly specify a locale in which floats
# are formatted the way that you describe, if that's not how your locale works :)
atof('123,456') # 123456.0
# To demonstrate, let's explicitly try a locale in which the comma is a
# decimal point:
setlocale(LC_NUMERIC, 'French_Canada.1252')
atof('123,456') # 123.456
  • 3
    Most pythonic and intuitive way so far. +1 – Aufwind Jul 9 '11 at 19:38
  • 2
    I'd up-vote this answer if the examples included both a decimal point and digit grouping characters in them... – martineau Jul 9 '11 at 20:38
  • 13
    Fine for a script, bad for a library: Extension modules should never call setlocale() – dangonfast Apr 29 '14 at 14:10
  • 12
    @wanderer: what's deprecated is the atof builtin method of strings. What I'm using here is the function atof from the locale standard library module, which is not deprecated at all. – Karl Knechtel Aug 29 '15 at 1:03
  • 5
    That's why star imports are bad - I would suggest you edit this to either import what's needed or better namespace as in locale.atof – Mr_and_Mrs_D Feb 20 '18 at 13:26
5

What about this?

 my_string = "123,456.908"
 commas_removed = my_string.replace(',', '') # remove comma separation
 my_float = float(commas_removed) # turn from string to float.

In short:

my_float = float(my_string.replace(',', ''))
4

If you have a comma as decimals separator and the dot as thousands separator, you can do:

s = s.replace('.','').replace(',','.')
number = float(s)

Hope it will help

2

If you don't know the locale and you want to parse any kind of number, use this parseNumber(text) function. It is not perfect but take into account most cases :

>>> parseNumber("a 125,00 €")
125
>>> parseNumber("100.000,000")
100000
>>> parseNumber("100 000,000")
100000
>>> parseNumber("100,000,000")
100000000
>>> parseNumber("100 000 000")
100000000
>>> parseNumber("100.001 001")
100.001
>>> parseNumber("$.3")
0.3
>>> parseNumber(".003")
0.003
>>> parseNumber(".003 55")
0.003
>>> parseNumber("3 005")
3005
>>> parseNumber("1.190,00 €")
1190
>>> parseNumber("1190,00 €")
1190
>>> parseNumber("1,190.00 €")
1190
>>> parseNumber("$1190.00")
1190
>>> parseNumber("$1 190.99")
1190.99
>>> parseNumber("1 000 000.3")
1000000.3
>>> parseNumber("1 0002,1.2")
10002.1
>>> parseNumber("")

>>> parseNumber(None)

>>> parseNumber(1)
1
>>> parseNumber(1.1)
1.1
>>> parseNumber("rrr1,.2o")
1
>>> parseNumber("rrr ,.o")

>>> parseNumber("rrr1rrr")
1
1
s =  "123,456.908"
print float(s.replace(',', ''))
1

Here's a simple way I wrote up for you. :)

>>> number = '123,456,789.908'.replace(',', '') # '123456789.908'
>>> float(number)
123456789.908
  • re is a big hammer for such a task. – Roman Bodnarchuk Jul 9 '11 at 8:05
  • @John Doe: Looks way better now. I like float(number) because of its descriptive touch. +1 ;-) – Aufwind Jul 9 '11 at 8:21
  • 2
    9 988 776,65 € in France 9.988.776,65 € in Germany $9,988,776.65 in the United States ----> Are you sure it works? – Alexandru R Dec 29 '16 at 19:59
0

Just replace, with replace().

f = float("123,456.908".replace(',','')) print(type(f)

type() will show you that it has converted into a float

0

Better solution for different currency formats:

def text_currency_to_float(text):
  t = text
  dot_pos = t.rfind('.')
  comma_pos = t.rfind(',')
  if comma_pos > dot_pos:
    t = t.replace(".", "")
    t = t.replace(",", ".")
  else:
    t = t.replace(",", "")

  return(float(t))

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