I'm currently creating a managed wrapper to an unmanaged dll. Point is the wrapper does a TON of calls to the unmanaged dll but exports very few methods itself. From the research I did this should be safe but I want to make sure I get this correctly. Essentially this is how I'm doing it.

[SuppressUnmanagedCodeSecurity()]
internal static class SomeAPI
{
    [DllImport("base.dll"]
    internal static extern bool Somefunc();
    [...] Other internal DllImports
}

public class Wrapper : IDisposable
{
    [SecurityPermission(SecurityAction.Demand, UnmanagedCode = true)]
    public Wrapper()
    {
        SomeAPI.SomeFunc();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    [SecurityPermission(SecurityAction.Demand, UnmanagedCode = true)]
    protected override void Dispose(bool disposeManagedResources)
    {
        SomeAPI.SomeFunc();
    }
}

Every method I add that is protected or public should get the [SecurityPermission(SecurityAction.Demand, UnmanagedCode = true)] attribute. And I mean every to avoid an accidental code path that leads to a SomeAPI call.

Now any method added to Wrapper that is internal or private is "safe". Is that assumption correct?

Sorry if I was unclear. I am writing the wrapper so it won't reformat the hard drive or something like that. The wrapper will be exposed in its own managed dll (along with other things). Because one call to the wrapper could result in 100's of calls to the unmanaged dll I don't want the performance overhead of the CLR checking all those calls - thus the use of SuppressUnmanagedCodeSecurity. The docs mention "Use this attribute with extreme care. Incorrect use can create security weaknesses.", and thats what I'm asking, am I "safe" again with the above methodology.

  • 4
    It is only 'safe' if you have checked that the function doesn't corrupt the heap or reformat the hard drive. What is unsafe is that this attribute stops the CLR from checking that there might be a managed method on the call stack that doesn't have unmanaged code execution permission and indirectly ended up calling your wrapper. You typically only worry about that if you are trying to create a sandbox. – Hans Passant Jul 9 '11 at 14:50

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