6

I've implemented a method for parsing an unsigned integer string of length <= 8 using SIMD intrinsics available in .NET as follows:

public unsafe static uint ParseUint(string text)
{
  fixed (char* c = text)
  {
    var parsed = Sse3.LoadDquVector128((byte*) c);
    var shift = (8 - text.Length) * 2;
    var shifted = Sse2.ShiftLeftLogical128BitLane(parsed, 
      (byte) (shift));

    Vector128<byte> digit0 = Vector128.Create((byte) '0');
    var reduced = Sse2.SubtractSaturate(shifted, digit0);

    var shortMult = Vector128.Create(10, 1, 10, 1, 10, 1, 10, 1);
    var collapsed2 = Sse2.MultiplyAddAdjacent(reduced.As<byte, short>(), shortMult);

    var repack = Sse41.PackUnsignedSaturate(collapsed2, collapsed2);
    var intMult = Vector128.Create((short)0, 0, 0, 0, 100, 1, 100, 1);
    var collapsed3 = Sse2.MultiplyAddAdjacent(repack.As<ushort,short>(), intMult);

    var e1 = collapsed3.GetElement(2);
    var e2 = collapsed3.GetElement(3);
    return (uint) (e1 * 10000 + e2);
  }
}

Sadly, a comparison with a baseline uint.Parse() gives the following, rather unimpressive, result:

Method Mean Error StdDev
Baseline 15.157 ns 0.0325 ns 0.0304 ns
ParseSimd 3.269 ns 0.0115 ns 0.0102 ns

What are some of the ways the above code can be improved? My particular areas of concern are:

  • The way a bit shift of the SIMD register happens with a calculation involving text.Length
  • ~~The unpacking of UTF-16 data using a MultiplyAddAdjacent involving a vector of 0s and 1~~
  • The way elements are extracted using GetElement() -- maybe there's some ToScalar() call that can happen somwehere?
11
  • 5
    Are you calling almost 5x improvement “rather unimpressive result”? :-)
    – Soonts
    Feb 25 '21 at 16:08
  • @500-InternalServerError sorry, fixed Feb 25 '21 at 16:30
  • is the baseline int.Parse()?
    – JAlex
    Feb 25 '21 at 16:41
  • 1
    You should be able to use SSSE3 pmaddubsw to multiply bytes and add horizontally into words (shorts). felixcloutier.com/x86/pmaddubsw. Except I think your data is starting as UTF-16, so nevermind. Related (for UTF-8 / ASCII): How to implement atoi using SIMD? detects the end of the number and shuffles accordingly, so it's probably pretty slow compared to scalar for numbers only a couple digits long. Feb 26 '21 at 6:29
  • 1
    Just curious. Why did you accept no answer?
    – aepot
    Mar 9 '21 at 15:13
7
+50

I've made some optimizations.

public unsafe uint ParseUint2(string text)
{
    fixed (char* c = text)
    {
        Vector128<ushort> raw = Sse3.LoadDquVector128((ushort*)c);
        raw = Sse2.ShiftLeftLogical128BitLane(raw, (byte)(8 - text.Length << 1));
        Vector128<ushort> digit0 = Vector128.Create('0');
        raw = Sse2.SubtractSaturate(raw, digit0);
        Vector128<short> mul0 = Vector128.Create(10, 1, 10, 1, 10, 1, 10, 1);
        Vector128<int> res = Sse2.MultiplyAddAdjacent(raw.AsInt16(), mul0);
        Vector128<int> mul1 = Vector128.Create(1000000, 10000, 100, 1);
        res = Sse41.MultiplyLow(res, mul1);
        res = Ssse3.HorizontalAdd(res, res);
        res = Ssse3.HorizontalAdd(res, res);
        return (uint)res.GetElement(0);
    }
}

Reduced amount of type conversions and final calculations were made with vphaddd. As result it's by ~10% faster.

But...imm8 must be a compile-time constant. It means you can't use a variable where imm8 is argument. Otherwise JIT compiler won't produce the intrinsic instruction for the operation. It will make an external method call at this place (maybe some workaround is there). Thanks @PeterCordes for help.

This monster isn't significantly but faster than above one, regardless of text.Length.

public unsafe uint ParseUint3(string text)
{
    fixed (char* c = text)
    {
        Vector128<ushort> raw = Sse3.LoadDquVector128((ushort*)c);
        switch (text.Length)
        {
            case 0: raw = Vector128<ushort>.Zero; break;
            case 1: raw = Sse2.ShiftLeftLogical128BitLane(raw, 14); break;
            case 2: raw = Sse2.ShiftLeftLogical128BitLane(raw, 12); break;
            case 3: raw = Sse2.ShiftLeftLogical128BitLane(raw, 10); break;
            case 4: raw = Sse2.ShiftLeftLogical128BitLane(raw, 8); break;
            case 5: raw = Sse2.ShiftLeftLogical128BitLane(raw, 6); break;
            case 6: raw = Sse2.ShiftLeftLogical128BitLane(raw, 4); break;
            case 7: raw = Sse2.ShiftLeftLogical128BitLane(raw, 2); break;
        };
        Vector128<ushort> digit0 = Vector128.Create('0');
        raw = Sse2.SubtractSaturate(raw, digit0);
        Vector128<short> mul0 = Vector128.Create(10, 1, 10, 1, 10, 1, 10, 1);
        Vector128<int> res = Sse2.MultiplyAddAdjacent(raw.AsInt16(), mul0);
        Vector128<int> mul1 = Vector128.Create(1000000, 10000, 100, 1);
        res = Sse41.MultiplyLow(res, mul1);
        res = Ssse3.HorizontalAdd(res, res);
        res = Ssse3.HorizontalAdd(res, res);
        return (uint)res.GetElement(0);
    }
}

Again, @PeterCordes doesn't allow me to write a slow code. The following version got 2 improvements. Now string loaded already shifted, and then subtracted to the shifted mask by the same offset. This avoids the slow fallback for ShiftLeftLogical128BitLane with a variable count.
The second improvement is replacing vphaddd with pshufd + paddd.

// Note that this loads up to 14 bytes before the data part of the string.  (Or 16 for an empty string)
// This might or might not make it possible to read from an unmapped page and fault, beware.
public unsafe uint ParseUint4(string text)
{
    const string mask = "\xffff\xffff\xffff\xffff\xffff\xffff\xffff\xffff00000000";
    fixed (char* c = text, m = mask)
    {
        Vector128<ushort> raw = Sse3.LoadDquVector128((ushort*)c - 8 + text.Length);
        Vector128<ushort> mask0 = Sse3.LoadDquVector128((ushort*)m + text.Length);
        raw = Sse2.SubtractSaturate(raw, mask0);
        Vector128<short> mul0 = Vector128.Create(10, 1, 10, 1, 10, 1, 10, 1);
        Vector128<int> res = Sse2.MultiplyAddAdjacent(raw.AsInt16(), mul0);
        Vector128<int> mul1 = Vector128.Create(1000000, 10000, 100, 1);
        res = Sse41.MultiplyLow(res, mul1);
        Vector128<int> shuf = Sse2.Shuffle(res, 0x1b); // 0 1 2 3 => 3 2 1 0
        res = Sse2.Add(shuf, res);
        shuf = Sse2.Shuffle(res, 0x41); // 0 1 2 3 => 1 0 3 2
        res = Sse2.Add(shuf, res);
        return (uint)res.GetElement(0);
    }
}

~Twice faster than initial solution. (o_O) At least on my Haswell i7.

12
  • 1
    Using vphaddd that way means there's room for further optimization with 2 fewer shuffle uops! Fastest way to do horizontal SSE vector sum (or other reduction) Mar 5 '21 at 21:24
  • 1
    @PeterCordes unless C# is doing something weird - it does. There's no intrinsic in the JIT output but the method call instead. I was surprised but that. Thank you for the clarification of this suspisious for me thing. :) I'll look deeper and update the answer later, thanks.
    – aepot
    Mar 5 '21 at 21:35
  • 1
    I don't think it's C++ vs. C#. Possibly it's a factor of what CPU exactly you're using (Sandybridge vs. Skylake vs. Zen vs. something else). Also, I didn't claim that the OP's strategy of (uint) (e1 * 10000 + e2); was better than using SIMD horizontal sums, although it might be. But certainly 2x pshufd + 2x paddd should be faster than 2x phaddd, so you can implement your strategy (horizontal vector sum before GetElement(0)) faster with cheaper shuffles. Mar 6 '21 at 2:04
  • 2
    Instead of using a fixed digit0 constant, load that from a sliding window of 0xffff and '0' bytes. (I earlier wrote 0x20 but that was a mistake). Like in Vectorizing with unaligned buffers: using VMASKMOVPS: generating a mask from a misalignment count? Or not using that insn at all but instead of loading an AND mask, you load a constant for psubusw that will zero the elements you want (because saturating unsigned sub can do that when you subtract 0xffff) Mar 6 '21 at 6:33
  • 1
    @PeterCordes implemented, it's really fast now. Great thanks!
    – aepot
    Mar 6 '21 at 8:06
5

C# (thanks @aepot)

public unsafe uint ParseUint(string text)
{
    fixed (char* c = text)
    {
        Vector128<byte> mul1 = Vector128.Create(0x14C814C8, 0x010A0A64, 0, 0).AsByte();
        Vector128<short> mul2 = Vector128.Create(0x00FA61A8, 0x0001000A, 0, 0).AsInt16();
        Vector128<long> shift_amount = Sse2.ConvertScalarToVector128Int32(8 - text.Length << 3).AsInt64();

        Vector128<short> vs = Sse2.LoadVector128((short*)c);
        Vector128<byte> vb = Sse2.PackUnsignedSaturate(vs, vs);
        vb = Sse2.SubtractSaturate(vb, Vector128.Create((byte)'0'));
        vb = Sse2.ShiftLeftLogical(vb.AsInt64(), shift_amount).AsByte();

        Vector128<int> v = Sse2.MultiplyAddAdjacent(Ssse3.MultiplyAddAdjacent(mul1, vb.AsSByte()), mul2);
        v = Sse2.Add(Sse2.Add(v, v), Sse2.Shuffle(v, 1));
        return (uint)v.GetElement(0);
    }
}

C solution using SSSE3:

#include <uchar.h> // char16_t
#include <tmmintrin.h> // pmaddubsw

unsigned ParseUint(char16_t* ptr, size_t len) {
    const __m128i mul1 = _mm_set_epi32(0, 0, 0x010A0A64, 0x14C814C8);
    const __m128i mul2 = _mm_set_epi32(0, 0, 0x0001000A, 0x00FA61A8);
    const __m128i shift_amount = _mm_cvtsi32_si128((8 - len) * 8);

    __m128i v = _mm_loadu_si128((__m128i*)ptr); // unsafe chunking
    v = _mm_packus_epi16(v,v); // convert digits from UTF16-LE to ASCII
    v = _mm_subs_epu8(v, _mm_set1_epi8('0'));
    v = _mm_sll_epi64(v, shift_amount); // shift off non-digit trash

    // convert
    v = _mm_madd_epi16(_mm_maddubs_epi16(mul1, v), mul2);
    v = _mm_add_epi32(_mm_add_epi32(v,v), _mm_shuffle_epi32(v, 1));
    
    return (unsigned)_mm_cvtsi128_si32(v);
}

Regardless of how one shifts/aligns the string (see aepot's anwser), we want to stay away from pmulld. SSE basically has 16-bit integer multiplication and the 32-bit multiply has double the latency and uops. However, care must be taken around the sign-extension behavior of pmaddubsw and pmaddwd.


using scalar x64:

// untested && I don't know C#
public unsafe static uint ParseUint(string text)
{
  fixed (char* c = text)
  {
    var xmm = Sse2.LoadVector128((ushort*)c); // unsafe chunking
    var packed = Sse2.PackSignedSaturate(xmm,xmm); // convert digits from UTF16-LE to ASCII
    ulong val = Sse2.X64.ConvertToUInt64(packed); // extract to scalar

    val -= 0x3030303030303030; // subtract '0' from each digit
    val <<= ((8 - text.Length) * 8); // shift off non-digit trash

    // convert
    const ulong mask = 0x000000FF000000FF;
    const ulong mul1 = 0x000F424000000064; // 100 + (1000000ULL << 32)
    const ulong mul2 = 0x0000271000000001; // 1 + (10000ULL << 32)
    val = (val * 10) + (val >> 8);
    val = (((val & mask) * mul1) + (((val >> 16) & mask) * mul2)) >> 32;
    return (uint)val;
  }
}

What if we don't know the length of the number ahead of time?

// C pseudocode & assumes ascii text
uint64_t v, m, len;
v = unaligned_load_little_endian_u64(p);
m = v + 0x4646464646464646; // roll '9' to 0x7F
v -= 0x3030303030303030; // unpacked binary coded decimal
m = (m | v) & 0x8080808080808080; // detect first non-digit
m = _tzcnt_u64(m >> 7); // count run of digits
if (((uint8_t)v) > 9) return error_not_a_number;
v <<= 64 - m; // shift off any "trailing" chars that are not digits
p += m >> 3; // consume bytes
v = parse_8_chars(v);

Or if we have a list of strings to process:

// assumes ascii text
__m256i parse_uint_x4(void* base_addr, __m256i offsets_64x4)
{
    const __m256i x00 = _mm256_setzero_si256();
    const __m256i x0A = _mm256_set1_epi8(0x0A);
    const __m256i x30 = _mm256_set1_epi8(0x30);
    const __m256i x08 = _mm256_and_si256(_mm256_srli_epi32(x30, 1), x0A);
    const __m256i mul1 = _mm256_set1_epi64x(0x010A0A6414C814C8);
    const __m256i mul2 = _mm256_set1_epi64x(0x0001000A00FA61A8);
    __m256i v, m;

    // process 4 strings at once, up to 8 digits in each string...
    // (the 64-bit chunks could be manually loaded using 3 shuffles)
    v = _mm256_i64gather_epi64((long long*)base_addr, offsets_64x4, 1);

    // rebase digits from 0x30..0x39 to 0x00..0x09
    v = _mm256_xor_si256(v, x30);

    // range check
    // (unsigned gte compare)
    v = _mm256_min_epu8(v, x0A);
    m = _mm256_cmpeq_epi8(x0A, v);

    // mask of lowest non-digit and above
    m = _mm256_or_si256(m, _mm256_sub_epi64(x00, m));

    // align the end of the digit-string to the top of the u64 lane
    // (shift off masked bytes and insert leading zeros)
    m = _mm256_sad_epu8(_mm256_and_si256(m, x08), x00);
    v = _mm256_sllv_epi64(v, m);
    
    // convert to binary
    // (the `add(v,v)` allow us to keep `mul2` unsigned)
    v = _mm256_madd_epi16(_mm256_maddubs_epi16(mul1, v), mul2);
    v = _mm256_add_epi32(_mm256_shuffle_epi32(v, 0x31), _mm256_add_epi32(v,v)); 

    // zero the hi-dwords of each qword
    v = _mm256_blend_epi32(v, x00, 0xAA);

    return v;
}
12
  • I've added C# translation for SSSE3. The fastest solution.
    – aepot
    Mar 7 '21 at 9:31
  • Doing _mm_subs_epu8 or epu16 first, (or at least before shifting) would create more ILP / hide more latency of the shift-count calculation and of movd from int to XMM. Sometimes latency from shift-count to retval won't be significant, but sometimes it might be. And it won't hurt throughput. Mar 7 '21 at 9:59
  • Also, _mm_sll_epi64 by a vector is actually slower on Skylake (2 uops) than AVX2 _mm_sllv_epi64 (1 uop). (Also allows different lengths if you packed 2 different strings into one 16-byte vector.) But the situation is reversed on Haswell: legacy shift-by-vector (count from low elem) is 1 uop, vs. 3 for variable. Zen is 1 uop for both, but sllv is higher lat, not fully pipelined(?). uops.info/… Mar 7 '21 at 10:10
  • Correction, on HSW, _mm_sllv_epi64 is only 2 uops. Agner reports 3, but uops.info/… measures 2, and I trust their automated testing more. (Link has the table filtered for these 2 insns, for HSW, CFL, ICL, Zen1, Zen2) Mar 7 '21 at 10:17
  • 1
    IMO you didn't need to make this community wiki; it's hard enough to gain rep in low-traffic asm / SIMD tags that you deserve the credit for your part of writing and editing this answer. Too late to undo it now, but in future don't feel like you need to do that unless you want to disown the answer and not take responsibility for its future contents. Mar 7 '21 at 16:21
3

First of all, 5x improvement is not “rather unimpressive”.

I would not do the last step with scalar code, here’s an alternative:

// _mm_shuffle_epi32( x, _MM_SHUFFLE( 3, 3, 2, 2 ) )
collapsed3 = Sse2.Shuffle( collapsed3, 0xFA );
// _mm_mul_epu32
var collapsed4 = Sse2.Multiply( collapsed3.As<int, uint>(), Vector128.Create( 10000u, 0, 1, 0 ) ).As<ulong, uint>();
// _mm_add_epi32( x, _mm_srli_si128( x, 8 ) )
collapsed4 = Sse2.Add( collapsed4, Sse2.ShiftRightLogical128BitLane( collapsed4, 8 ) );
return collapsed4.GetElement( 0 );

The C++ version gonna be way faster than what happens on my PC (.NET Core 3.1). The generated code is not good. They initialize constants like this:

00007FFAD10B11B6  xor         ecx,ecx  
00007FFAD10B11B8  mov         dword ptr [rsp+20h],ecx  
00007FFAD10B11BC  mov         dword ptr [rsp+28h],64h  
00007FFAD10B11C4  mov         dword ptr [rsp+30h],1  
00007FFAD10B11CC  mov         dword ptr [rsp+38h],64h  
00007FFAD10B11D4  mov         dword ptr [rsp+40h],1  

They use stack memory instead of another vector register. It looks like JIT developers forgot there’re 16 vector registers there, the complete function only uses xmm0.

00007FFAD10B1230  vmovapd     xmmword ptr [rbp-0C0h],xmm0  
00007FFAD10B1238  vmovapd     xmm0,xmmword ptr [rbp-0C0h]  
00007FFAD10B1240  vpsrldq     xmm0,xmm0,8  
00007FFAD10B1245  vpaddd      xmm0,xmm0,xmmword ptr [rbp-0C0h]  
1
  • This offers no improvements in performance. Feb 25 '21 at 17:15

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