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An article about changes in C# 6.0 at Microsoft presents read-only auto-properties and claims (emphasis by myself):

An interesting consequence of support for auto-property initializers is that it eliminates many of the cases found in earlier versions where you needed explicit field declarations. (...) On the other hand, the need to declare read-only fields becomes virtually deprecated. Now, whenever a read-only field is declared, you can declare a read-only auto-property possibly as private, if that level of encapsulation is required.

Why in the world would I do that?

I fully understand the benefits of exposting properties rather than fields, as this maintains binary compatibility even in cases where I need to add some validation code or similar in a later version. But what is the benefit of always having a private read-only property over a private read-only field?

Please note that I am not asking about specific scenarios where a private read-only property has benefits over a private read-only field. The quoted article implies whenever a private read-only field could be used, one should opt for a private read-only property instead. Is there any tangible benefit from this, or was this just the author's enthusiasm about the new feature going overboard?

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    Your quote has the answer: "if that level of encapsulation is required." - granted, that's subjective.
    – Dai
    Feb 26, 2021 at 16:00
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    Methinks you're reading it wrong -- I interpret the author as saying a read-only field is no longer needed as the backing field of a property. They're not saying that all read-only fields (including those not backing properties) are suddenly obsolete. The stuff about private properties is just to remind you that those, too, are a thing. I grant you the way things are formulated is a little clumsy. Feb 26, 2021 at 16:01
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    "you can" does not mean "you should" - those are very different semantics. There's a whole IETF RFC that describes the differences between "shall", "may", "must" and more.
    – Dai
    Feb 26, 2021 at 16:01
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    I disagree. I agree with @JeroenMostert in that the article's author is merely providing a suggestion, not a recommendation - let alone a blanket recommendation - to use auto-properties over direct field access.
    – Dai
    Feb 26, 2021 at 16:07
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    @O.R.Mapper: the author says this in the explicit context of "eliminat[ing] many of the cases found in earlier versions where you needed explicit field declarations". If you think the author really meant that fields are now obsolete for all purposes and you want to know why, I suggest asking the author (Mark Michaelis), not the Internet. If Mark was arguing that all private fields should be replaced with properties, I'd disagree (for the record), but I don't think he says that. Feb 26, 2021 at 16:10

1 Answer 1

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I replace the full context. This sentence is in the chapter Primary Contructors. With primary constructors, it make sense to replace read-only backing field by Auto-Property Initializers.

I agree, this sentence is weird :

Now, whenever a read-only field is declared, you can declare a read-only auto-property possibly as private, if that level of encapsulation is required.

When I read this, I see two axioms :

  1. With primary constructor, you should use auto-property initializer instead of read-only backing field.
  2. Hey guy, it's possibly to declare the property with auto initializer private

I think the author has favored brevity instead of readability or the author advocate to the end of field.

But the primary constructor isn't integrated in the final C#6 or next versions, so we still need backing field a long time.

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