6

I want Perl (5.8.8) to find out what word has the most letters in common with the other words in an array - but only letters that are in the same place. (And preferably without using libs.)

Take this list of words as an example:

  • BAKER
  • SALER
  • BALER
  • CARER
  • RUFFR

Her BALER is the word that has the most letters in common with the others. It matches BAxER in BAKER, xALER in SALER, xAxER in CARER, and xxxxR in RUFFR.

I want Perl to find this word for me in an arbitrary list of words with the same length and case. Seems I've hit the wall here, so help is much appreciated!

What I've tried until now

Don't really have much of a script at the moment:

use strict;
use warnings; 
my @wordlist = qw(BAKER SALER MALER BARER RUFFR);
foreach my $word (@wordlist) {
    my @letters = split(//, $word);
    # now trip trough each iteration and work magic...
}

Where the comment is, I've tried several kinds of code, heavy with for-loops and ++ varables. Thus far, none of my attempts have done what I need it to do.

So, to better explain: What I need is to test word for word against the list, for each letterposition, to find the word that has the most letters in common with the others in the list, at that letter's position.

One possible way could be to first check which word(s) has the most in common at letter-position 0, then test letter-position 1, and so on, until you find the word that in sum has the most letters in common with the other words in the list. Then I'd like to print the list like a matrix with scores for each letterposition plus a total score for each word, not unlike what DavidO suggest.

What you'd in effect end up with is a matrix for each words, with the score for each letter position, and the sum total score fore each word in the matrix.

Purpose of the Program

Hehe, I might as well say it: The program is for hacking terminals in the game Fallout 3. :D My thinking is that it's a great way to learn Perl while also having fun gaming.

Here's one of the Fallout 3 terminal hacking tutorials I've used for research: FALLOUT 3: Hacking FAQ v1.2, and I've already made a program to shorten the list of words, like this:

#!/usr/bin/perl
# See if one word has equal letters as the other, and how many of them are equal
use strict;
use warnings; 

my $checkword = "APPRECIATION"; # the word to be checked
my $match = 4; # equal to the match you got from testing your checkword
my @checkletters = split(//, $checkword); #/

my @wordlist = qw(
    PARTNERSHIPS
    REPRIMANDING
    CIVILIZATION
    APPRECIATION
    CONVERSATION
    CIRCUMSTANCE
    PURIFICATION
    SECLUSIONIST
    CONSTRUCTION
    DISAPPEARING
    TRANSMISSION
    APPREHENSIVE
    ENCOUNTERING
);

print "$checkword has $match letters in common with:\n";

foreach my $word (@wordlist) {
    next if $word eq $checkword;
    my @letters = split(//, $word);
    my $length = @letters; # determine length of array (how many letters to check)

    my $eq_letters = 0; # reset to 0 for every new word to be tested
    for (my $i = 0; $i < $length; $i++) {
        if ($letters[$i] eq $checkletters[$i]) {
            $eq_letters++;
        }
    }
    if ($eq_letters == $match) {
        print "$word\n";
    }
}
# Now to make a script on to find the best word to check in the first place...

This script will yield CONSTRUCTION and TRANSMISSION as its result, just as in the game FAQ. The trick to the original question, though (and the thing I didn't manage to find out on my own), is how to find the best word to try in the first place, i.e. APPRECIATION.

OK, I've now supplied my own solution based on your help, and consider this thread closed. Many, many thanks to all the contributers. You've helped tremendously, and on the way I've also learned a lot. :D

  • 1
    Can you show us your script, so we have something to go on? – Flimzy Jul 10 '11 at 5:12
  • Sure, Flimzy! Updated. :) – Kebman Jul 10 '11 at 17:35
  • Possibly, the easiest way to solve this, is to calculate the Hamming Distance between the words. However I wonder if it can only compare two and two words... – Kebman May 4 '12 at 12:28
  • I have looked at the Hacking FAQ and that seems like a prolog task to me, would be applicable to perl thoug. – Patrick J. S. Oct 4 '14 at 20:37
5

As a starting point, you can efficiently check how many letters they have in common with:

$count = ($word1 ^ $word2) =~ y/\0//;

But that's only useful if you loop through all possible pairs of words, something that isn't necessary in this case:

use strict;
use warnings;
my @words = qw/
    BAKER
    SALER
    BALER
    CARER
    RUFFR
/;

# you want a hash to indicate which letters are present how many times in each position:

my %count;
for my $word (@words) {
    my @letters = split //, $word;
    $count{$_}{ $letters[$_] }++ for 0..$#letters;
}

# then for any given word, you get the count for each of its letters minus one (because the word itself is included in the count), and see if it is a maximum (so far) for any position or for the total:

my %max_common_letters_count;
my %max_common_letters_words;
for my $word (@words) {
    my @letters = split //, $word;
    my $total;
    for my $position (0..$#letters, 'total') {
        my $count;
        if ( $position eq 'total' ) {
            $count = $total;
        }
        else {
            $count = $count{$position}{ $letters[$position] } - 1;
            $total += $count;
        }
        if ( ! $max_common_letters_count{$position} || $count >= $max_common_letters_count{$position} ) {
            if ( $max_common_letters_count{$position} && $count == $max_common_letters_count{$position} ) {
                push @{ $max_common_letters_words{$position} }, $word;
            }
            else {
                $max_common_letters_count{$position} = $count;
                $max_common_letters_words{$position} = [ $word ];
            }
        }
    }
}

# then show the maximum words for each position and in total: 

for my $position ( sort { $a <=> $b } grep $_ ne 'total', keys %max_common_letters_count ) {
    printf( "Position %s had a maximum of common letters of %s in words: %s\n",
        $position,
        $max_common_letters_count{$position},
        join(', ', @{ $max_common_letters_words{$position} })
    );
}
printf( "The maximum total common letters was %s in words(s): %s\n",
    $max_common_letters_count{'total'},
    join(', ', @{ $max_common_letters_words{'total'} })
);
  • 1
    I really enjoyed sifting through the logic, and seeing a working example of Lingua::EN::Inflect. But I do have a question. Now that you know how many common letters each word has, how do you figure out which word matched the most rows in each colunn position? Don't you need to keep a cumulative score of how many rows match each column? (Maybe I'm making the spec too difficult). – DavidO Jul 10 '11 at 6:28
  • 1
    Lingua::EN::Inflect makes pluralization easy; a more complex example: print inflect("NUM($_) PL_N(nation) PL_V(endorses) but PL_V(isn't) endorsed") for 0..2 – ysth Jul 10 '11 at 7:15
  • No, you aren't making it too difficult; I was misreading it. – ysth Jul 10 '11 at 7:16
  • 1
    @Kebman: look through it one bit at a time; dump out datastructures with e.g. print Data::Dumper::Dumper(\%max_common_letters_words) to see what data it's gathering; ask here if any particular bit stumps you – ysth Jul 10 '11 at 22:28
  • 1
    @ysth: Apologies, before claiming that the xor trick didn't work with non-ASCII data, I did test it. Unfortunately my test used '\x{101}' instead of "\x{101}" - oops. – Grant McLean Jul 14 '11 at 0:49
7

Here's one way. Having re-read your spec a couple of times I think it's what you're looking for.

It's worth mentioning that it's possible there will be more than one word with an equal top score. From your list there's only one winner, but it's possible that in longer lists, there will be several equally winning words. This solution deals with that. Also, as I understand it, you count letter matches only if they occur in the same column per word. If that's the case, here's a working solution:

use 5.012;
use strict;
use warnings;
use List::Util 'max';

my @words = qw/
    BAKER
    SALER
    BALER
    CARER
    RUFFR
/;

my @scores;
foreach my $word ( @words ) {
    my $score;
    foreach my $comp_word ( @words ) {
        next if $comp_word eq $word;
        foreach my $pos ( 0 .. ( length $word ) - 1 ) {
            $score++ if substr( $word, $pos, 1 ) eq substr( $comp_word, $pos, 1);
        }
    }
    push @scores, $score;
}
my $max = max( @scores );
my ( @max_ixs ) = grep { $scores[$_] == $max } 0 .. $#scores;

say "Words with most matches:";
say for @words[@max_ixs];

This solution counts how many times per letter column each word's letters match other words. So for example:

Words:     Scores:       Because:
ABC        1, 2, 1 = 4   A matched once,  B matched twice, C matched once.
ABD        1, 2, 1 = 4   A matched once,  B matched twice, D matched once.
CBD        0, 2, 1 = 3   C never matched, B matched twice, D matched once.
BAC        0, 0, 1 = 1   B never matched, A never matched, C matched once.

That gives you the winners of ABC and ABD, each with a score of four positional matches. Ie, the cumulative times that column one, row one matched column one row two, three, and four, and so on for the subsequent columns. It may be able to be optimized further, and re-worded to be shorter, but I tried to keep the logic fairly easy to read. Enjoy!

UPDATE / EDIT I thought about it and realized that though my existing method does exactly what your original question requested, it did it in O(n^2) time, which is comparatively slow. But if we use hash keys for each column's letters (one letter per key), and do a count of how many times each letter appears in the column (as the value of the hash element), we could do our summations in O(1) time, and our traversal of the list in O(n*c) time (where c is the number of columns, and n is the number of words). There's some setup time too (creation of the hash). But we still have a big improvement. Here is a new version of each technique, as well as a benchmark comparison of each.

use strict;
use warnings;
use List::Util qw/ max sum /;
use Benchmark qw/ cmpthese /;

my @words = qw/
    PARTNERSHIPS
    REPRIMANDING
    CIVILIZATION
    APPRECIATION
    CONVERSATION
    CIRCUMSTANCE
    PURIFICATION
    SECLUSIONIST
    CONSTRUCTION
    DISAPPEARING
    TRANSMISSION
    APPREHENSIVE
    ENCOUNTERING
/;


# Just a test run for each solution.
my( $top, $indexes_ref );

($top, $indexes_ref ) = find_top_matches_force( \@words );
print "Testing force method: $top matches.\n";
print "@words[@$indexes_ref]\n";

( $top, $indexes_ref ) = find_top_matches_hash( \@words );
print "Testing hash  method: $top matches.\n";
print "@words[@$indexes_ref]\n";



my $count = 20000;
cmpthese( $count, {
    'Hash'  => sub{ find_top_matches_hash( \@words ); },
    'Force' => sub{ find_top_matches_force( \@words ); },
} );


sub find_top_matches_hash {
    my $words = shift;
    my @scores;
    my $columns;
    my $max_col = max( map { length $_ } @{$words} ) - 1;
    foreach my $col_idx ( 0 .. $max_col ) {
        $columns->[$col_idx]{ substr $_, $col_idx, 1 }++ 
            for @{$words};
    }
    foreach my $word ( @{$words} ) {
        my $score = sum( 
            map{ 
                $columns->[$_]{ substr $word, $_, 1 } - 1
            } 0 .. $max_col
        );
        push @scores, $score;
    }
    my $max = max( @scores );
    my ( @max_ixs ) = grep { $scores[$_] == $max } 0 .. $#scores;
    return(  $max, \@max_ixs );
}


sub find_top_matches_force {
    my $words = shift;
    my @scores;
    foreach my $word ( @{$words} ) {
        my $score;
        foreach my $comp_word ( @{$words} ) {
            next if $comp_word eq $word;
            foreach my $pos ( 0 .. ( length $word ) - 1 ) {
                $score++ if 
                    substr( $word, $pos, 1 ) eq substr( $comp_word, $pos, 1);
            }
        }
        push @scores, $score;
    }
    my $max = max( @scores );
    my ( @max_ixs ) = grep { $scores[$_] == $max } 0 .. $#scores;
    return( $max, \@max_ixs );
}

The output is:

Testing force method: 39 matches.
APPRECIATION
Testing hash  method: 39 matches.
APPRECIATION
        Rate Force  Hash
Force 2358/s    --  -74%
Hash  9132/s  287%    --

I realize your original spec changed after you saw some of the other options provided, and that's sort of the nature of innovation to a degree, but the puzzle was still alive in my mind. As you can see, my hash method is 287% faster than the original method. More fun in less time!

  • You are absolutely right! Those are the kind of matches I'm after. However I'd really like a version that work with Perl version 5.8.8. – Kebman Jul 10 '11 at 17:33
  • 1
    Take out the line that says use 5.012; Replace the two "say" statements with "print" statements, and put a \n newline, like this: print "Words with most matches:\n"; print "$_\n" for @words[@max_ixs];. Now you've got a version that works for 5.8.8! I hope you find a fun use for it. I haven't figured out what problem you're solving with it, but it was a fun diversion figuring out the logic. – DavidO Jul 10 '11 at 20:35
  • Thank you so much! :D Here is what I want to solve: gamefaqs.com/pc/918428-fallout-3/faqs/54644 Now I just wonder, can you do away with the lib? Or is it default with most Perl installations? – Kebman Jul 10 '11 at 21:03
  • 1
    The only thing that's being done with List::Utils is finding the max. You could do the same thing by putting the following lines in the code (and removing the my $max = max(... line): Right before "my @scores;", put "my $max = 0;" Right before the "push @scores..." put $max = ( $score > $max ) ? $score : $max;. Finally, remove the use List::Utils.. line. Anything else before my answer can meet your needs? Have fun. – DavidO Jul 10 '11 at 21:40
  • 1
    See my update for a much more time-efficient solution. – DavidO Jul 11 '11 at 0:04
4

Here's a complete script. It uses the same idea that ysth mentioned (although I had it independently). Use bitwise xor to combine the strings, and then count the number of NULs in the result. As long as your strings are ASCII, that will tell you how many matching letters there were. (That comparison is case sensitive, and I'm not sure what would happen if the strings were UTF-8. Probably nothing good.)

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

use List::Util qw(max);

sub findMatches
{
  my ($words) = @_;

  # Compare each word to every other word:
  my @matches = (0) x @$words;

  for my $i (0 .. $#$words-1) {
    for my $j ($i+1 .. $#$words) {
      my $m = ($words->[$i] ^ $words->[$j]) =~ tr/\0//;

      $matches[$i] += $m;
      $matches[$j] += $m;
    }
  }

  # Find how many matches in the best word:
  my $max = max(@matches);

  # Find the words with that many matches:
  my @wanted = grep { $matches[$_] == $max } 0 .. $#matches;

  wantarray ? @$words[@wanted] : $words->[$wanted[0]];
} # end findMatches

my @words = qw(
    BAKER
    SALER
    BALER
    CARER
    RUFFR
);

say for findMatches(\@words);
2

Haven't touched perl in a while, so pseudo-code it is. This isn't the fastest algorithm, but it will work fine for a small amount of words.

totals = new map #e.g. an object to map :key => :value

for each word a
  for each word b
    next if a equals b

    totals[a] = 0
    for i from 1 to a.length
      if a[i] == b[i]
        totals[a] += 1
      end
    end
  end
end

return totals.sort_by_key.last

Sorry about the lack of perl, but if you code this into perl, it should work like a charm.

A quick note on run-time: this will run in time number_of_words^2 * length_of_words, so on a list of 100 words, each of length 10 characters, this will run in 100,000 cycles, which is adequate for most applications.

  • Cool! I think this is the approach I used in my own attempt to answer the question. However, having read up on the topic, I now wonder how you could make the pattern into a Ternary Tree style search? – Kebman Aug 4 '11 at 1:19
  • I'm sure there's tons of ways to go about this-- and I'd be happy to explore it. As a simple question to you: what is the magnitude of input you're looking at? What level of efficiency do you hope to achieve? – ghayes Aug 4 '11 at 21:43
  • I realize the scope of THIS project isn't worth it, but for fun, let's say A LOT! – Kebman Aug 6 '11 at 4:17
1

Here's a version that relies on transposing the words in order to count the identical characters. I used the words from your original comparison, not the code.

This should work with any length words, and any length list. Output is:

Word    score
----    -----
BALER   12
SALER   11
BAKER   11
CARER   10
RUFFR   4

The code:

use warnings;
use strict;

my @w = qw(BAKER SALER BALER CARER RUFFR);
my @tword = t_word(@w);

my @score;
push @score, str_count($_) for @tword;
@score = t_score(@score);

my %total;

for (0 .. $#w) {
    $total{$w[$_]} = $score[$_];
}

print "Word\tscore\n";
print "----\t-----\n";
print "$_\t$total{$_}\n" for (sort { $total{$b} <=> $total{$a} } keys %total);

# transpose the words
sub t_word {
    my @w = @_;
    my @tword;
    for my $word (@w) {
        my $i = 0;
        while ($word =~ s/(.)//) {
            $tword[$i++] .= $1;
        }
    }
    return @tword;
}

# turn each character into a count
sub str_count {
    my $str = uc(shift);
    while ( $str =~ /([A-Z])/ ) {
        my $chr = $1;
        my $num = () = $str =~ /$chr/g;
        $num--;
        $str =~ s/$chr/$num /g;
    }
    return $str;
}

# sum up the character counts
# while reversing the transpose
sub t_score {
    my @count = @_;
    my @score;
    for my $num (@count) {
        my $i = 0;
        while( $num =~ s/(\d+) //) {
            $score[$i++] += $1;
        }
    }
    return @score;
}
1

Here is my attempt at an answer. This will also allow you to see each individual match if you need it. (ie. BALER matches 4 characters in BAKER). EDIT: It now catches all matches if there is a tie between words (I added "CAKER" to the list to test).

#! usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @wordlist = qw( BAKER SALER BALER CARER RUFFR CAKER);

my %wordcomparison;

#foreach word, break it into letters, then compare it against all other words
#break all other words into letters and loop through the letters (both words have same amount), adding to the count of matched characters each time there's a match
foreach my $word (@wordlist) {
    my @letters = split(//, $word);
    foreach my $otherword (@wordlist) {
        my $count;
        next if $otherword eq $word;
        my @otherwordletters = split (//, $otherword);
        foreach my $i (0..$#letters) {
            $count++ if ( $letters[$i] eq $otherwordletters[$i] );
        }
        $wordcomparison{"$word"}{"$otherword"} = $count;
    }
}

# sort (unnecessary) and loop through the keys of the hash (words in your list)
# foreach key, loop through the other words it compares with
#Add a new key: total, and sum up all the matched characters.
foreach my $word (sort keys %wordcomparison) {
    foreach ( sort keys %{ $wordcomparison{$word} }) {
        $wordcomparison{$word}{total} += $wordcomparison{$word}{$_};
    }
}

#Want $word with highest total

my @max_match = (sort { $wordcomparison{$b}{total} <=> $wordcomparison{$a}{total} } keys %wordcomparison );

#This is to get all if there is a tie:
my $maximum = $max_match[0];
foreach (@max_match) {
print "$_\n" if ($wordcomparison{$_}{total} >= $wordcomparison{$maximum}{total} )
}

The output is simply: CAKER BALER and BAKER.

The hash %wordcomparison looks like:

'SALER'
        {
          'RUFFR' => 1,
          'BALER' => 4,
          'BAKER' => 3,
          'total' => 11,
          'CARER' => 3
        };
0

You can do this, using a dirty regex trick to execute code if a letter matches in its place, but not otherwise, thankfully it's quite easy to build the regexes as you go:

An example regular expression is:

(?:(C(?{ $c++ }))|.)(?:(A(?{ $c++ }))|.)(?:(R(?{ $c++ }))|.)(?:(E(?{ $c++ }))|.)(?:(R(?{ $c++ }))|.)

This may or may not be fast.

use 5.12.0;
use warnings;
use re 'eval';

my @words = qw(BAKER SALER BALER CARER RUFFR);

my ($best, $count) = ('', 0);
foreach my $word (@words) {
    our $c = 0;
    foreach my $candidate (@words) {
    next if $word eq $candidate;

    my $regex_str = join('', map {"(?:($_(?{ \$c++ }))|.)"} split '', $word);
    my $regex = qr/^$regex_str$/;

    $candidate =~ $regex or die "did not match!";
    }
    say "$word $c";
    if ($c > $count) {
    $best = $word;
    $count = $c;
    }
}

say "Matching: first best: $best";

Using xor trick will be fast but assumes a lot about the range of characters you might encounter. There are many ways in which utf-8 will break with that case.

  • No need for an O(N**2) solution here (which the xor also would have been); I think that double counts if a letter in your word matches multiple candidates. Also, ^ should work just fine on utf8. – ysth Jul 10 '11 at 5:55
  • Rereading the question, it should count multiple times if a letter in the word matches multiple other words, sorry. – ysth Jul 10 '11 at 7:24
  • Yes, it was a nice little puzzle anyway. I like the better hash approach, and really should have tried that first. – Alex Jul 10 '11 at 10:50
0

Many thanks to all the contributers! You've certainly shown me that I still have a lot to learn, but you have also helped me tremendously in working out my own answer. I'm just putting it here for reference and possible feedback, since there are probably better ways of doing it. To me this was the simplest and most straight forward approach I could find on my own. Enjøy! :)

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings; 

# a list of words for testing
my @list = qw( 
BAKER
SALER
BALER
CARER
RUFFR
);

# populate two dimensional array with the list, 
# so we can compare each letter with the other letters on the same row more easily 
my $list_length = @list;
my @words;

for (my $i = 0; $i < $list_length; $i++) {
    my @letters = split(//, $list[$i]);
    my $letters_length = @letters;
    for (my $j = 0; $j < $letters_length; $j++) {
        $words[$i][$j] = $letters[$j];
    }
}
# this gives a two-dimensionla array:
#
# @words = (    ["B", "A", "K", "E", "R"],
#               ["S", "A", "L", "E", "R"],
#               ["B", "A", "L", "E", "R"],
#               ["C", "A", "R", "E", "R"],
#               ["R", "U", "F", "F", "R"],
# );

# now, on to find the word with most letters in common with the other on the same row

# add up the score for each letter in each word
my $word_length = @words;
my @letter_score;
for my $i (0 .. $#words) {
    for my $j (0 .. $#{$words[$i]}) {
        for (my $k = 0; $k < $word_length; $k++) {
            if ($words[$i][$j] eq $words[$k][$j]) {
                $letter_score[$i][$j] += 1; 
            }
        }
        # we only want to add in matches outside the one we're testing, therefore
        $letter_score[$i][$j] -= 1;
    }
}

# sum each score up
my @scores;
for my $i (0 .. $#letter_score ) {
    for my $j (0 .. $#{$letter_score[$i]}) {
        $scores[$i] += $letter_score[$i][$j];
    }
}

# find the highest score
my $max = $scores[0];
foreach my $i (@scores[1 .. $#scores]) {
    if ($i > $max) {
        $max = $i;
    }
}

# and print it all out :D
for my $i (0 .. $#letter_score ) {
    print "$list[$i]: $scores[$i]";
    if ($scores[$i] == $max) {
        print " <- best";
    }   
    print "\n";
}

When run, the script yields the following:

BAKER: 11
SALER: 11
BALER: 12 <- best
CARER: 10
RUFFR: 4

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