1

Check the example below... I have an array TSrvClientList.Items with record elements. These elements have string fields. When I remove an element, I need to move the following ones in that empty space left. I don't like to copy field by field... And I thought I'd use the Move function to do it faster, but I'm not sure if this is a proper way to do it. If the record contained only unmanaged types, I'm sure it's OK, I uesed many times. But with those strings, I don't know... Should I call a Finalize first ? Or do it differently ? My test code seems it works as it is, directly moving those strings, but I'd like to make sure it's not just a coincidence.

unit Unit1;

interface

uses
  Winapi.Windows, Winapi.Messages, System.SysUtils, System.Variants, System.Classes,
  Vcl.Graphics,  Vcl.Controls, Vcl.Forms, Vcl.Dialogs, SynCommons, System.SyncObjs,
  Vcl.StdCtrls;

type
  TSrvClientInfo = record
   ClientIP: String;
   ClientGUID: Cardinal;
   AESKey: THash256;
   TransCons: Integer;
  end;

  TSrvClientList = record
   private
    Valid: DWord;
   public
    Items: array of TSrvClientInfo;
    procedure Init;
    procedure Free;
    procedure AddClient(const IP: String; GUID: Cardinal; AESKey: THash256);
    procedure RemoveClient(const IP: String; GUID: Cardinal);
  end;

  TForm1 = class(TForm)
    BAddItem: TButton;
    BRemoveItem: TButton;
    procedure FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
    procedure BAddItemClick(Sender: TObject);
    procedure BRemoveItemClick(Sender: TObject);
  public
    Code: Byte;
    Clients: TSrvClientList;
  end;

var
  Form1: TForm1;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}

//===== TSrvClientList =======================================================

procedure TSrvClientList.Init;
begin
 if Valid <> $12344321 then begin
  Valid:= $12344321;
  SetLength(Items, 0);
 end;
end;

procedure TSrvClientList.Free;
begin
 if Valid = $12344321 then begin
  SetLength(Items, 0);
  Valid:= 0;
 end;
end;

procedure TSrvClientList.AddClient(const IP: String; GUID: Cardinal; AESKey: THash256);
var I: Integer;
begin
 if Valid <> $12344321 then Exit;
 I:= Length(Items); SetLength(Items, I+1);
 Items[I].ClientIP:= IP;
 Items[I].ClientGUID:= GUID;
 Items[I].AESKey:= AESKey;
 Items[I].TransCons:= 0;
end;

procedure TSrvClientList.RemoveClient(const IP: String; GUID: Cardinal);
var I, R: Integer;
begin
 if Valid <> $12344321 then Exit;
 I:= 0; while (I < Length(Items)) and ((Items[I].ClientIP <> IP) or (Items[I].ClientGUID <> GUID)) do Inc(I);
 if (I > High(Items)) then Exit;
 R:= High(Items) - I;
 if R > 0 then Move(Items[I+1], Items[I], SizeOf(TSrvClientInfo) * R);
 SetLength(Items, Length(Items)-1);
end;

// ----------------------------------------------------

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
begin
 Clients.Init;
 Code:= 1;
end;

procedure TForm1.BAddItemClick(Sender: TObject);
var IP: String;
    GUID: Cardinal;
    AESKey: THash256;
begin
 IP:= '192.168.0.3';
 GUID:= $12345678;
 FillChar(AESKey[0], 32, 0); AESKey[0]:= Code; Inc(Code);
 Clients.AddClient(IP, GUID, AESKey);
 Caption:= IntToStr(Length(Clients.Items));
end;

procedure TForm1.BRemoveItemClick(Sender: TObject);
var IP: String;
    GUID: Cardinal;
begin
 IP:= '192.168.0.3';
 GUID:= $12345678;
 Clients.RemoveClient(IP, GUID);
 Caption:= IntToStr(Length(Clients.Items));
end;

end.
6
  • You have a memory leak. Yes, you need to finalize the record that is being removed from the array, so that its string member's refcount is decremented properly before being overwritten. Also note that decrementing the length of the array will also finalize the record on the end of the array, so you don't want to finalize that record after moving it – Remy Lebeau Feb 26 at 23:05
  • @RemyLebeau Indeed... I checked and the leak is there. I inserted a Finalize(Items[I]); before the Move function and the leak is gone. Now I can use it without fear of getting some unexpected behavoir ? – Marus Nebunu Feb 26 at 23:22
  • no, because you still have the last record in the array to deal with. If you just move raw data around, you will end up with 2 array slots at the end referring to the same string in memory without incrementing its refcount, and then resizing the array down will finalize 1 of them, causing the refcount to be out of sync with reality. – Remy Lebeau Feb 27 at 1:25
  • Why don't you just call Delete(Items, I, 1)? – Uwe Raabe Feb 27 at 9:00
  • 1
    Also consider using a TList<TSrvClientInfo> instead of a dynamic array. – Olivier Feb 27 at 9:46
3

No need to call Finalize, Move and SetLength. The intrinsic Delete already handles all this for you:

Delete(Items, I, 1);
5
  • Wow ! This is great ! I thought Delete is just for strings or simple arrays (like array of byte, or something...). So, it can handle arrays of records with managed fields too ? – Marus Nebunu Feb 27 at 9:25
  • @MarusNebunu The documentation says "dynamic array" and doesn't put any restrictions, so, yes, it should work with any arrays. – Olivier Feb 27 at 9:41
  • 2
    Just beware of its quirks. – Andreas Rejbrand Feb 27 at 10:04
  • @AndreasRejbrand I read your answer to that question... Let me see if I understood correctly, that bug shows up only if my array is ref counted (shared) ? – Marus Nebunu Feb 27 at 10:27
  • 1
    @MarusNebunu: True, so it might not apply to your situation. It seems like Embarcadero hasn't fixed it yet. – Andreas Rejbrand Feb 27 at 10:31
3

As you suspect, you mustn't do this because of the string member. This is because strings are managed types, as you say.

Consider the following much smaller example:

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
var
  A: array of string;
begin

  ReportMemoryLeaksOnShutdown := True;

  SetLength(A, 6);
  A[0] := 'cats';      A[1] := 'dogs';     A[2] := 'rats';
  A[3] := 'rabbits';   A[4] := 'horses';   A[5] := 'guinea pigs';

  Move(A[3], A[2], 3 * SizeOf(string));
  SetLength(A, Length(A) - 1);

end;

Note: I choose not to use the simpler (post-XE7) approach

A := ['cats', 'dogs', 'rats', 'rabbits', 'horses', 'guinea pigs'];

because then the reference count of the dynamic array heap object will be 2 instead of 1, and the analysis will be more complicated.

This may seem to work until you exit the application. Then you are notified of this:

Message box: Unexpected Memory Leak. An unexpected memory leak has occurred. The unexpected small block leaks are: 21  28 bytes: UnicodeString x 1

And this is very expected. Recall the internal data format for long strings. Long strings are reference counted. Let's look at the heap object for rats before the Move (open the Memory panel and go to Pointer(A[2])^):

Memory dump

Notice that the reference count is 1 (and the string length is 4). If you step through the code you will notice that this heap object is never touched again. It is leaked because the RTL never gets a chance to clear it up.

You can fix this leak by adding Finalize(A[2]) before the Move.

However, there is another issue. Immediately after the move, both A[4] and A[5] point to the same long string heap object. Here's the array heap object (refcount, length, and six pointers):

Memory

Going to this address, we find this:

Memory

This is a long string with reference count 1 -- but we would expect it to be 2. What will happen now when you call SetLength to remove the last item? Will that not lead to the heap object hitting refcount 0 and being freed, meaning that the new last string pointer, A[4], will be dangling?

Yes, I think so.

And if I try

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
var
  A: array of string;
begin

  ReportMemoryLeaksOnShutdown := True;

  SetLength(A, 6);
  A[0] := 'cats';      A[1] := 'dogs';     A[2] := 'rats';
  A[3] := 'rabbits';   A[4] := 'horses';   A[5] := 'guinea pigs';

  Finalize(A[2]);
  Move(A[3], A[2], 3 * SizeOf(string));
  SetLength(A, Length(A) - 1);

  for var s in A do
    ShowMessage(s);

end;

I am shown "cats", "dogs", "rabbits", "horses", "d". You will probably observe a different behaviour.

Likely this can be fixed by clearing the last pointer behind the back of the RTL prior to the SetLength:

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
var
  A: array of string;
begin

  ReportMemoryLeaksOnShutdown := True;

  SetLength(A, 6);
  A[0] := 'cats';      A[1] := 'dogs';     A[2] := 'rats';
  A[3] := 'rabbits';   A[4] := 'horses';   A[5] := 'guinea pigs';

  Finalize(A[2]);               // frees the A[2]^ string and sets A[2] to nil
  Move(A[3], A[2], 3 * SizeOf(string));
  NativeInt(A[5]) := 0;         // sets A[5] to nil
  SetLength(A, Length(A) - 1);

  for var s in A do
    ShowMessage(s);

end;

Do I need to tell you this is a hack that shouldn't be used?


Interestingly, if I use an "array literal" instead, the initial reference count of the dynamic array is 2, so the SetLength will create a new dynamic array heap object, and at least on my system right now, the behaviour appears to be correct, but I haven't analysed the program in detail.

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