-3

I am trying to find out why I am getting null in console. As you can see I am initializing the object at public Student() => name = "Foo"; but I am getting null

using System;  
  
namespace Tutorial  
{  
    class Program  
    {  
        static void Main(string[] args)  
        {  
            Student st = new Student();  
            Console.WriteLine(st.Name);
        }  
    }  
  
    public class Student
    {
       private string name;
       public Student() => name = "Foo";
       public string Name
       {
          get; set;
       }
    }
} 
5
  • 2
    You have a field name and a property Name - both are independent - and you only set the field inside the constructor. So the property Name is still null when you read it. – Sir Rufo Feb 27 at 22:54
  • This is a great chance to learn how to use the debugger. Put breakpoints on the Student constructor, on both the Name getter and setter, and on the first line of Main (where you construct st). Press F5 to start your program. When it stops put both name and Name in a watch window. Step through (F10). Note that the Name getter is called, but the setter never gets called. Keep an eye on the watch window. When you are in the Name getter, look at the call stack – Flydog57 Feb 27 at 23:16
  • 1
    A quick reminder about the begging tone in your questions, Behseini (my recent feedback is in these comments). – halfer Feb 27 at 23:55
  • 1
    Your last contribution was auto-deleted by the abuse filter. – halfer Feb 28 at 9:33
  • 1
    Meanwhile you might want to take a look at the reception on this question: three close votes and three downvotes (I have not voted on this question). So you have a choice: you can take this feedback into account in your next question, or you can carry on getting a poor reception. – halfer Feb 28 at 9:33
2

The auto-property is not being initialized with a value, so that's why you are getting null.

It might be important to show the difference between fields and properties.

public class Student
{
    // This is a field. It stores the actual data
    private string name;

    // This is an auto-property. The actual private field cannot be accessed directly.
    public string Name
    {
        get; set;
    }

    // This is a manual property which exposes a getter and a setter for the private field.
    public string NameProperty
    {
        get
        {
            return name;
        }
        set
        {
            name = value;
        }
    }
}

So, you've got several options. You might want just get rid of the field like so:

public class Student
{
   public Student() => Name = "Foo";
   public string Name
   {
      get; set;
   }
}

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.