2

I'm a beginner, this was my assessment question on Codility and I'm looking for solutions. I tried but couldn't get the required output. I've spent days trying to crack this but I'm unable to do so. Any solution that can help me understand what I am supposed to do would be helpful. Click here to view question on Number of Castles (part 1) (part 2)

In my solution I'm comparing two values at a time but as the given example suggests heights can be same and we have to compare with the next available value which is not same. I have no idea how to do this.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace CodilityPractice
{
    class Castle2
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int[] A = { 2, 2, 3, 4, 3, 3, 2, 2, 1, 1, 2, 5 };
            Console.WriteLine(solution(A));

            Console.Read();
        }

        static int solution(int[] A)
        {
            int hills = 0;
            int valley = 0;

            int Q = 0;
            for (int P = 0; P < A.Length; P++)
            {
                Q = P + 1;
                if(P==0)
                {
                    if (A[P + 1] > A[P])
                        valley++;
                    continue;
                }
                if(Q==A.Length-1)
                {
                    if (A[Q - 1] < A[Q])
                        hills++;

                }
                if (P > 0 && Q < A.Length-1)
                {
                    if (A[P - 1] < A[P] && A[Q + 1] < A[Q])
                    { hills++; }
                    else if (A[P - 1] > A[P] && A[Q + 1] > A[Q])
                    { valley++; }
                }

            }
            return hills + valley;

        }
    }
}

4
  • Just FYI, the question seems to assume you're using C++, so you might want to do just that. Feb 28, 2021 at 7:42
  • @AluanHaddad this picture was taken from a site as I didn't take a picture of my question during the assessment It was set to C#.
    – Covet
    Feb 28, 2021 at 7:52
  • First create a method that returns sequences of same-height spans, where each such span would also have the height of the preceeding span and the next span. Then for each span where the height is below both the preceeding and next span, or above it, you build a castle. According to the image I'm also assuming that all such hills or valleys, regardless of width, will only contain 1 castle. Jun 25, 2021 at 6:38
  • what would Q and P mean for you?
    – Char
    Jun 3, 2022 at 10:04

7 Answers 7

4

The way I understand the question, we are looking for a working solution, and for an explanation of the intuition behind it. In that sense, the following code should solve the problem in O(N) and O(1) time and space complexity, respectively.

    public static int calculateCastles(int[] A) {
        int N = A.length;
        if (N == 0) return 0;
        int count = 0;
        int prevValue = A[0];
        for(int idx = 1; idx < N - 1; idx++) {
            if(((A[idx] - prevValue) * (A[idx + 1] - A[idx])) < 0) {
                count++;
                prevValue = A[idx];
            }
        }
        if(count == 0){
            if(A[0] == A[N-1]) return 1;
            return 2;
        }
        return count + 2;
    }

To solve this problem, it is useful to be aware of math property that states that when you have a stationary point in a function, i.e., either a maximum or a minimum, the sign of the derivative switches at that point. In other words, if the function was increasing (decreasing) right before reaching the point and then starts decreasing (increasing) right after it, then you have a maximum/peak (minimum/valley) at the point.

My solution basically itereates through the array and checks how many times the previous property holds. In particular, the condition ((A[idx] - prevValue) * (A[idx + 1] - A[idx])) < 0 represents a very convenient way to test for that. Note that:

  • prevValue keeps track of the height of the last min/max discovered, and is initially set to A[0];
  • (A[idx] - prevValue) represents the derivative before idx, and;
  • (A[idx + 1] - A[idx]) is the derivative after idx.

If the funtion is monotonically increasing or decreasing, both factors will be positive and negative, respectively. This means that their product is positive. On the other hand, if at idx you have a valley, you go down and then up, so (A[idx] - prevValue) has to be negative, and (A[idx + 1] - A[idx]) has to be positve. Their product is thus negative. A similar analysis can be made for peaks.

Try to understand why we need to keep track of prevVal instead of simply using (A[idx] - A[idx - 1]). Also, an interesting point to note is that when the product of the aforementioned factors is exactly 0, then we are in a flat area, and we are simply moving forward without adding to the count.

Lastly, the condition at the end is testing for rather edge cases. If the previous loop did not find any valley or peak, there are two options:

  • either we are in a completely flat region such that A[0] == A[N-1] and thus only 1 castle can be constructed, e.g. [4, 4, 4] or;
  • we are in a region with two flat areas, e.g. [1, 1, 3, 3] or [1, -5], and thus we can construct two castles.

Finally, if our loop did actually detect any valley or peak, then besides this count, we also need to take into consideration the castle that will be constructed at each the extremes of the terrain, and sum 2.

7
  • That +2 is wrong. If you read the question again it says [1,3] returns 1 because only 1 castle can be built
    – Alexis
    Mar 21, 2023 at 1:34
  • I find your comment confusing. For [1, 3], the loop finishes without even iterating so count = 0 and thus the branch with the +2 you mention is never reached. The example you are talking about does not appear in the question, not sure where you are reading it but I just see [-3, -3] as a similar one. In any case, to me it looks completely illogical that the case you mention should return 1. Mar 22, 2023 at 2:30
  • [0,1] forms both a valley and a hill and only one castle can be built. It's on the part2 screenshot
    – Alexis
    Mar 23, 2023 at 11:20
  • Those are the indexes where the valleys are: [0, 1] refers to [2, 2] whereas [8, 9] to [1, 1]. Mar 24, 2023 at 12:30
  • 1
    It seems you missed the line with the 'return 1' statement. Mar 26, 2023 at 15:56
0

Please correct your edge cases:

if(P==0)
{
    if(0 > A[P])
        valley++;
    else if( 0 < A[P])
        hills ++;
    continue;
}
if(Q==A.Length-1)
{
    if(A[Q-1] > 0)
        hills++;
    else if(A[Q-1] < 0)
        valley ++;
    continue;
}
0
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int[] F = { 2, 2, 3, 4, 3, 3, 2, 2, 1, 1, 2, 5 ,0};
        int[] F2 = new int[F.Length];
        int newDirection = 0;
        int lastDirection = 0;
        int Count = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < F.Length; i++)
        {
            if (i == 0)
            {
                F2[i] = 1;
                newDirection = 1;
                Count++;
            }
            else
            {
                if (F[i - 1] == F[i])
                {
                    if (F2[i - 1] == 1)
                    {
                        F2[i] = 1;
                        Count++;
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    lastDirection = newDirection;
                    if (F[i - 1] >= F[i])
                    {
                        newDirection =-1;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        newDirection =1;
                    }
                }
            }
            if(lastDirection !=newDirection && i!=0 && lastDirection!=0)
            {
                lastDirection = newDirection;
                Count++;
                F2[i-1] = 1;
                if (F[i - 1] == F[i - 2])
                {
                    F2[i - 2] = 1;
                    Count++;
                }
            }
        }
    }
2
  • the result is in Count you can see the flow in array F2 Jun 13, 2022 at 11:30
  • Please put explanations in your answer by editing, rather than commenting. Jun 15, 2022 at 12:10
0
class Solution {
    public int solution(int[] A) {
        // write your code in C# 6.0 with .NET 4.5 (Mono)
    
        if(A == null || A.Length == 0)
            return 0;
        if(A.Length == 1)
            return 1;
        int count = 1;
        int i = 0, j = i + 1;
        while(i < A.Length && j < A.Length){
            if(A[j] == A[i]){
                ++i;
                ++j;
            }else if(A[j] > A[i]){
                ++count;
                int k = j + 1;
                while(k < A.Length && A[k] >= A[k - 1]){
                    ++k;
                }
                if(k == A.Length)
                    return count;
                i = k - 1;
                j = k;
            }else{
                ++count;
                int k = j + 1;
                while(k < A.Length && A[k] <= A[k - 1]){
                    ++k;
                }
                if(k == A.Length)
                    return count;
                i = k - 1;
                j = k;
            }
        }
        return count;
        }
}
0

To build upon Del Fiore's answer, I offer the following solution:

public static int calculateCastles(int[] A) {
    var streamlined = new ArrayList<>(List.of(A[0]));

    // removing successive duplicates since they add no value in calculation
    for (int i = 1; i < A.length; i++) {
        if (A[i] != A[i - 1]) {
            streamlined.add(A[i]);
        }
    }

    // the graph contains only one point
    if (streamlined.size() == 1) {
        return 1;
    }
    
    var localMin = 0;
    var localMax = 0;
    
    // checking the graph extremes for local maxima & minima
    if (streamlined.get(0) < streamlined.get(1)) {
        localMin++;
    }

    if (streamlined.get(0) > streamlined.get(1)) {
        localMax++;
    }

    if (streamlined.get(streamlined.size() - 1) < streamlined.get(streamlined.size() - 2)) {
        localMin++;
    }

    if (streamlined.get(streamlined.size() - 1) > streamlined.get(streamlined.size() - 2)) {
        localMax++;
    }

    // checking the rest of the graph for local maxima & minima
    for (int i = 1; i < streamlined.size() - 1; i++) {
        if (streamlined.get(i + 1) < streamlined.get(i) && streamlined.get(i - 1) < streamlined.get(i)) {
            localMax++;
        }

        if (streamlined.get(i + 1) > streamlined.get(i) && streamlined.get(i - 1) > streamlined.get(i)) {
            localMin++;
        }
    }

    return localMax + localMin;
}

The most significant change is the following:

  • since the castle can have an arbitrary width, one should eliminate all successive duplicate values, since they mess up the local minima & maxima search
  • once removed, you have a streamlined graph which can then be searched for the correct number of local minima & maxima
  • if a streamlined graph contains only one point, the method should return 1 since the point itself is both local minima & maxima

Hope this helps :)

1
  • Just in case, my solution overcomes the issue of the succesive duplicated values by not increasing the count when the condition inside the loop equals 0, which can only happen if there is a flat region, i.e. duplicated values next to each other. I did not attempt to differenciate between max and min, but it would.still be possible...hence I would say that removing the duplicates might help emphasize more the valleys and peaks, so one could do that but is not actually requiered Mar 22, 2023 at 3:02
0

Easy approach

  1. loop for the end of the list and remove all terrain. example, from the list [2, 2, 3, 4, 3, 3, 2, 2, 1, 1, 2, 5] now will have only: [2, 3, 4, 3, 2, 1, 2, 5]
  2. loop again the new list above and check the condition

if (a[i -1] < a[i] > a[i+1]) then is hill and +1
 if (a[i - 1] > a [i] < a[i+1]) then valley
 if i == 0 then hill + 1 
 if i == length(a) then val

0
function solution(A) {
    let index = 0;
    let hills = 0;
    let valleys = 0;
    let direction = -1;

    while (index < A.length) {
        if (A[index + 1] === A[index]) {
        } else if (A[index + 1] > A[index] && direction !== 1) {
            valleys++;
            direction = 1;
        } else if (A[index + 1] < A[index] && direction !== 0) {
            hills++;
            direction = 0;
        }

        index++;
    }

    return hills + valleys + 1;
}

const A = [-3, -2];
console.log(solution(A));

Hope this helps. I use a "direction" variable to keep track whether I'm going upward or downward, then based on the hight of the next "mountain" I increase valleys or hills. direction = 0 means we're going downward, direction = 1 means we're going upward. To cover the case when we are at the very end of the list - the position where we will always form a hill or a valley, I always add 1 to the answer. Seems like it works well with these inputs:

A = [-3, -3] -> 1
A = [0, 1] -> 2
A = [2, 2, 3, 4, 3, 3, 2, 2, 1, 1, 2, 5] -> 4
A = [2, 2, 3, 4, 3, 3, 2, 2, 1, 1, 2, 5, 5, 5, 1] -> 5

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