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For my game, I'm trying to make it so whatever happens to a player that lands on a tile only happens to that player and not to everyone in the game so I don't copy the same variable 4 times for everything a player is able to do.

For example, I have something like:

badChest1 = random.choice([mob1, jail1, trapped_chest1, ("You creak open the chest to discover nothing but a pile of cobwebs")])
badChest2 = random.choice([mob2, jail2, trapped_chest2, ("You creak open the chest to discover nothing but a pile of cobwebs")])
badChest3 = random.choice([mob3, jail3, trapped_chest3, ("You creak open the chest to discover nothing but a pile of cobwebs")])
badChest4 = random.choice([mob4, jail4, trapped_chest4, ("You creak open the chest to discover nothing but a pile of cobwebs")])

in my code. I would be grateful if anyone knows a way I only need to make one variable each.

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  • Probably many ways to do it. One way: for i in numOfPlayers: badChest[i] = random.choice([mob[i], jail[i], trapped_chest[i], ("You creak open the chest to discover nothing but a pile of cobwebs")]) Of course this can also be "translated" to working with dictionaries of players and etc. – Nir Alfasi Feb 28 at 13:55
  • Could you describe your game in more detail? I can not figure out what you are trying to do in the first place. What are these "tiles"? What kind of game you have? what are these Chests? – user3431635 Feb 28 at 13:56
  • hi, sorry for not adding context. The game is like a monopoly game, with the chests as chance cards and the tiles are the spaces players can land on. The chests offer a random event for whoever lands on that chest tile, good or bad, and I'm coding all the bad things that could happen for the bad chest, although I could probably just combine the goodChest and badChest. I'm trying to make it so whoever lands on the chest tile has the events of goodChest happen only to that player. I hope I was able to clarify it. Thanks. – Dobred247 Feb 28 at 14:12
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The best way to get rid of many variables is to have loops and lists. Instead of one variable for each player, you can simply add a list:

#mob1 = Mob()
#mob2 = Mob()

mobs = [Mob(), Mob()]

as such, you can also reference each as a list, and loop through them:

mobs[1]
for mob in mobs:
    print("The repr of my mob:", mob)

If you happen to have had already written most of your code, and don't want to change hundreds of lines (we all hate it too :), you can use a for loop with an exec statement. Not recommended, but it works, and saves you having to rewrite a lot of your code:

for value in range(1, 5): #range returns a list of numbers. In this case 1-4
    exec("""badChest%i = random.choice([mob%i, jail%i, trapped_chest%i, ("You creak open the chest to discover nothing but a pile of cobwebs")])""" % ((value,)*4))

That was a bit of a whopper of new code there, so let's break it down. First, I used multiline strings ("""). These are just a different type of quote. If I had used double quotes, the double quotes in the actual string would have cancelled them out, raising a lot of errors:

>>> "Hello world - "Joe""
SyntaxError: invalid syntax

Next, I used python's string formatting with the %s. It allows you to insert values into strings. Some of the most common indices are %s, for strings, %d or %i for integers, %f for floating-point values. In a string, you put these indices in wherever you want, then you pass them values at the end with another %:

>>> x = 5
>>> print( "Hello world, x is %i, and this is my string: %d" % (x, "strings") )
Hello world, x is 5, and this is my string: strings

Next, I just used list multiplication, to make (value,) (comma is to make it a tuple) four times longer, as we have four %is in the string:

>>> y = [1, 2, 3]
>>> y*3
[1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3]

and exec just runs strings as if they were code. To summarize, this loops through a range of 1-4, and for each value of the loop, it runs code this code, but with the %i signs equal to the current iteration through the range:

badChest%i = random.choice([mob%i, jail%i, trapped_chest%i, ("You creak open the chest to discover nothing but a pile of cobwebs")])

Which is exactly equal to:

badChest1 = random.choice([mob1, jail1, trapped_chest1, ("You creak open the chest to discover nothing but a pile of cobwebs")])
badChest2 = random.choice([mob2, jail2, trapped_chest2, ("You creak open the chest to discover nothing but a pile of cobwebs")])
badChest3 = random.choice([mob3, jail3, trapped_chest3, ("You creak open the chest to discover nothing but a pile of cobwebs")])
badChest4 = random.choice([mob4, jail4, trapped_chest4, ("You creak open the chest to discover nothing but a pile of cobwebs")])
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  • Thank you very much! It certainly is a lot of new code, however I shall study this post deeply to understand it completely. I very much appreciate the time taken to teach me this. – Dobred247 Feb 28 at 21:32
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I will just create an example for someone new in Python. Let's say you have a list or a dict.

lst = [1, 2, 3]

if you do something like this.

x = lst
y = lst

you are not copying lst, both x and y are referring to the same object. A usual way to deal with it is something like:

[lst for _ in range(10)]

This will create 10 different duplicates of lst in another list.

This might not answer your question directly, but this is a common pitfall to new developers in python. Have a look about python's reference to its object types to have a better idea.

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I think this is where object oriented programming starts to become useful. You should write functions that only do something to specified objects.

I didn't really stick to your example, but I wrote a small toy example for you. The important thing is that open_trapped_cheast() takes objects(players) as input:

from collections import defaultdict
import random


class Player:
    def __init__(self, name, health):
        self.name = name
        self.status = set()
        self.health = health()
        self.inventory = defaultdict(int)

    def add_item(self, item, number):
        self.inventory[item] += number


def open_trapped_chest(player):
    status = random.choice(["nothing", "poison"])
    loot_table = {
        "coins": 97,
        "rubies": 2,
        "artifact": 1,
        "cool hats": 3,
    }
    player.status.add(status)
    draws = random.randint(5, 25)
    loot = random.choices(list(loot_table.keys()),
                          list(loot_table.values()),
                          k=draws)
    for item in loot:
        player.inventory[item] += 1
hero1 = Player("Johnny", 100)
hero2 = Player("Anita", 100)

open_trapped_chest(hero1)
open_trapped_chest(hero2)

# The result is random but could something like:
print(f"{hero1.name} is affected by {hero1.status}")
# Johnny is affected by {'poison'}

print(f"{hero1.name} has the following items {dict(hero1.inventory)}")
# Johnny has the following items {'coins': 19, 'cool hats': 1, 'artifact': 1})

print(f"{hero2.name} is affected by {hero2.status}")
# Anita is affected by {'nothing'}

print(f"{hero2.name} has the following items {dict(hero2.inventory})")
# Anita has the following items {'coins': 14, 'rubies': 2})

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