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So in my little game, there is a happiness mechanic, I want it to be capped at 100, and show the player how much happiness they lost due to the overflow, but it keeps showing 100. (I created the integer happiness at the very start), its in a switch statement, all other parts of the switch work well.

case 5:
if (happiness <= 100) {
    happiness = happiness + 20;
    cout<< "The festival goes well";
    if (happiness > 100) {
        int lost_happiness = happiness - (happiness%100);
        happiness = happiness - (happiness%100);

        cout << ", however, happiness has reached the cap of 100. The amount lost is " << lost_happiness;
    }
}
break;

Any ideas why?

6
  • Please extract and provide a minimal reproducible example. I'm sure you will find the mistake yourself if you try to reproduce this with minimal code in isolation. As a new user here, also take the tour and read How to Ask. – Ulrich Eckhardt Mar 1 at 13:45
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    Just subtract 100 then cap it: int lost_happiness = happiness - 100; happiness = 100; – Johnny Mopp Mar 1 at 13:46
  • Note, it is also better to not hard code the value 100 in case you want to someday change it: const int MAX_HAPPINESS = 100; This way you only need to change in one place. This also helps in searches. – Johnny Mopp Mar 1 at 13:50
  • Your code says that happiness - (happiness%100) is both the lost happiness and the remaining happiness. It can only be one of them. – molbdnilo Mar 1 at 13:52
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    @UlrichEckhardt: Why do you need a MRE for this question? The answer is really completely obvious. Or is that a standard comment that you put under all such questions? But then it would be spam . . . – Armin Montigny Mar 1 at 13:54
2

You are using the same formula to calculate both the lost_happiness and new happiness values:

    int lost_happiness =  happiness - (happiness%100); // Notice the similarity
    happiness =           happiness - (happiness%100); // in the two RHS codes?

This is incorrect, and the former should just be happiness % 100.

if (happiness <= 100) {
    happiness += 20;
    cout<< "The festival goes well";
    if (happiness > 100) {
        int lost_happiness = happiness % 100;   // DON'T subtract this from total
        happiness -= lost_happiness;            // No need to recalculate the "%"
        cout << ", however, happiness has reached the cap of 100. The amount lost is " << lost_happiness;
     }
}

Note that I have also used some techniques to make your code rather more succinct; please feel free to ask for further details and/or clarification.

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3

From what I understand case 5 is always showing 100 and it should . Just think let initial happiness be 95 , you add 20 it becomes 115 .then you are subtracting 115%100 I.e. 15 from it , so the answer will become 100 in every case .

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