1

I have a dynamodb table called events in which i stored all user event details like product_view ,add_to_cart and product_purchase

In this events table, I have some items whose storage capacity reached 400kb

Issue:

        response = self._table.get_item(
            Key={
                PARTITION_KEY: <pk>,
                SORT_KEY: <sk>,
            },
            ConsistentRead=False,
        )

when I want to use dynamodb get_item method to access the item(400kb), it is taking around 5 seconds to return the result.

I already used DAX

Goal

I want to read 400kb item in less than a 1 second.

Important information:

The data in the dynamodb will be stored in this format

{
 "partition_key": "user_id1111",
 "sort_key": "version_1",
 "attributes": {
  "events": [
   {
    "t": "1614712316",  
    "a": "product_view",   
    "i": "1275"
   },
   {
    "t": "1614712316",  
    "a": "product_add",   
    "i": "1275"
   },
   {
    "t": "1614712316",  
    "a": "product_purchase",   
    "i": "1275"
   },
    ...

  ]
 }
}
  • t is a timestamp
  • a may be product_view,product_add,product_purchase
  • i is the product_id

If you see above item events is a list and it will be appended by new events.

I have an item which is 400kb with number of events in the events list

I wrote some script to measure the time and the results are given below

import boto3
import datetime

dynamodb = boto3.resource('dynamodb')

table = dynamodb.Table('events')

pk = f"user_id1111"
sk = f"version_1"


t_load_start = datetime.datetime.now()


response = table.get_item(
    Key={
        "partition_key": pk,
        "sort_key": sk,
    },
    ReturnConsumedCapacity="TOTAL"
)
capacity_units = response["ConsumedCapacity"]["CapacityUnits"]

t_load_end = datetime.datetime.now()
seconds = (t_load_end - t_load_start).total_seconds()

print(f"Elapsed time is::{seconds}sec and {capacity_units} capacity units")

This is the output I'm getting.

Elapsed time is::5.676799sec and 50.0 capacity units

Can anyone suggest a solution for this?

21
  • You're not going to want to hear this, but I'd start reconsidering the data model. Technically 5 seconds is 5000 milliseconds, can you be more precise with the performance requirements? ;-)
    – Maurice
    Mar 1, 2021 at 20:52
  • @maurice, I want to get the item in less than 1 second
    – siva
    Mar 1, 2021 at 21:05
  • 1
    So, your local is an EC2 instance in us-east-1? Or is the ddb table in us-east-1? Mar 2, 2021 at 19:43
  • 1
    5 seconds isn't a reasonable measurement regardless of item size/geography; you're most likely being throttled. You can check in the 'Metrics' tab of your table in the AWS Console, see the 'Throttled read requests/events' graphs, or check if boto3 is retrying Mar 2, 2021 at 19:58
  • 1
    Is the Lambda function definitely in the same region as the DynamoDB table? Is the Lambda running in VPC and, if so, do you have any unusual network routing?
    – jarmod
    Mar 3, 2021 at 15:34

2 Answers 2

4

tl;dr: Increase your functions memory to at least 1024MB, see update 2


I was curious, so I did some measurements. I created a script that creates a big boi item with pretty much exactly 400KB in size in a fresh table.

Then I test two reads from Python - one with the resource API and the other with the lower level client - eventually consistent reads in both cases.

Here's what I measured:

Reading Big Boi from a Table Resource took 0.366508s and consumed 50.0 RCUs
Reading Big Boi from a Client took 0.301585s and consumed 50.0 RCUs

If we extrapolate from the RCUs, the item it read was about 50 * 2 * 4KB = 400 KB in size (eventually consistent reads consume 0.5 RCUs).

I ran it a few times locally from Germany against eu-central-1 (Frankfurt, Germany) and the highest latency I saw was about 900ms. (This is without DAX.)

As a result of that I think you should show us how you did your measurements.

import uuid
from datetime import datetime, timedelta

import boto3
import boto3.dynamodb.conditions as conditions

TABLE_NAME = "big-boi-test"
BIG_BOI_PK = "f0ba8d6c"

TABLE_RESOURCE = boto3.resource("dynamodb").Table(TABLE_NAME)
DDB_CLIENT = boto3.client("dynamodb")

def create_table():
    DDB_CLIENT.create_table(
        AttributeDefinitions=[{"AttributeName": "PK", "AttributeType": "S"}],
        TableName=TABLE_NAME,
        KeySchema=[{"AttributeName": "PK", "KeyType": "HASH"}],
        BillingMode="PAY_PER_REQUEST"
    )

def create_big_boi_item() -> str:
    # based on calculations here: https://zaccharles.github.io/dynamodb-calculator/
    template = {
        "PK": {
            "S": BIG_BOI_PK
        },
        "bigBoi": {
            "S": ""
        }
    } # This is 16 bytes

    big_boi = "X" * (1024 * 400 - 16)
    template["bigBoi"]["S"] = big_boi
    return template

def store_big_boi():
    big_bio = create_big_boi_item()

    DDB_CLIENT.put_item(
        Item=big_bio,
        TableName=TABLE_NAME
    )

def get_big_boi_with_table_resource():

    start = datetime.now()
    response = TABLE_RESOURCE.get_item(
        Key={"PK": BIG_BOI_PK},
        ReturnConsumedCapacity="TOTAL"
    )
    end = datetime.now()
    seconds = (end - start).total_seconds()
    capacity_units = response["ConsumedCapacity"]["CapacityUnits"]

    print(f"Reading Big Boi from a Table Resource took {seconds}s and consumed {capacity_units} RCUs")

def get_big_boi_with_client():

    start = datetime.now()
    response = DDB_CLIENT.get_item(
        Key={"PK": {"S": BIG_BOI_PK}},
        ReturnConsumedCapacity="TOTAL",
        TableName=TABLE_NAME
    )
    end = datetime.now()
    seconds = (end - start).total_seconds()
    capacity_units = response["ConsumedCapacity"]["CapacityUnits"]

    print(f"Reading Big Boi from a Client took {seconds}s and consumed {capacity_units} RCUs")

if __name__ == "__main__":
    # create_table()
    # store_big_boi()
    get_big_boi_with_table_resource()
    get_big_boi_with_client()

Update

I did the same measurements again with an item that looks more like the one you're using, I'm still below 1000ms on average no matter which way I request them:

Reading Big Boi from a Table Resource took 1.492829s and consumed 50.0 RCUs
Reading Big Boi from a Table Resource took 0.871583s and consumed 50.0 RCUs
Reading Big Boi from a Table Resource took 0.857513s and consumed 50.0 RCUs
Reading Big Boi from a Table Resource took 0.769432s and consumed 50.0 RCUs
Reading Big Boi from a Table Resource took 0.690172s and consumed 50.0 RCUs
Reading Big Boi from a Table Resource took 0.670099s and consumed 50.0 RCUs
Reading Big Boi from a Table Resource took 0.633489s and consumed 50.0 RCUs
Reading Big Boi from a Table Resource took 0.605999s and consumed 50.0 RCUs
Reading Big Boi from a Table Resource took 0.598635s and consumed 50.0 RCUs
Reading Big Boi from a Table Resource took 0.606553s and consumed 50.0 RCUs
Reading Big Boi from a Client took 1.66636s and consumed 50.0 RCUs
Reading Big Boi from a Client took 0.921605s and consumed 50.0 RCUs
Reading Big Boi from a Client took 0.831735s and consumed 50.0 RCUs
Reading Big Boi from a Client took 0.707082s and consumed 50.0 RCUs
Reading Big Boi from a Client took 0.668602s and consumed 50.0 RCUs
Reading Big Boi from a Client took 0.648401s and consumed 50.0 RCUs
Reading Big Boi from a Client took 0.5695s and consumed 50.0 RCUs
Reading Big Boi from a Client took 0.592073s and consumed 50.0 RCUs
Reading Big Boi from a Client took 0.611436s and consumed 50.0 RCUs
Reading Big Boi from a Client took 0.553827s and consumed 50.0 RCUs
Average latency over 10 requests with the table resource: 0.7796304s
Average latency over 10 requests with the client: 0.7770621s

This is what the item looks like:

enter image description here enter image description here

Here is the full test-script for you to verify:

import statistics
import uuid
from datetime import datetime, timedelta

import boto3
import boto3.dynamodb.conditions as conditions

TABLE_NAME = "big-boi-test"
BIG_BOI_PK = "NestedBoi"

TABLE_RESOURCE = boto3.resource("dynamodb").Table(TABLE_NAME)
DDB_CLIENT = boto3.client("dynamodb")

def create_table():
    DDB_CLIENT.create_table(
        AttributeDefinitions=[{"AttributeName": "PK", "AttributeType": "S"}],
        TableName=TABLE_NAME,
        KeySchema=[{"AttributeName": "PK", "KeyType": "HASH"}],
        BillingMode="PAY_PER_REQUEST"
    )

def create_big_boi_item() -> str:
    # based on calculations here: https://zaccharles.github.io/dynamodb-calculator/
    template = {
        "PK": {
            "S": "NestedBoi"
        },
        "bigBoiContainer": {
            "M": {
            "bigBoiList": {
                "L": [
                
                ]
            }
            }
        }
    } # 43 bytes

    item = {
        "M": {
        "t": {
            "S": "1614712316"
        },
        "a": {
            "S": "product_view"
        },
        "i": {
            "S": "1275"
        }
        }
    }  # 36 bytes

    number_of_items = int((1024 * 400 - 43) / 36)

    for _ in range(number_of_items):
        template["bigBoiContainer"]["M"]["bigBoiList"]["L"].append(item)

    return template

def store_big_boi():
    big_bio = create_big_boi_item()

    DDB_CLIENT.put_item(
        Item=big_bio,
        TableName=TABLE_NAME
    )

def get_big_boi_with_table_resource():

    start = datetime.now()
    response = TABLE_RESOURCE.get_item(
        Key={"PK": BIG_BOI_PK},
        ReturnConsumedCapacity="TOTAL"
    )
    end = datetime.now()
    seconds = (end - start).total_seconds()
    capacity_units = response["ConsumedCapacity"]["CapacityUnits"]

    print(f"Reading Big Boi from a Table Resource took {seconds}s and consumed {capacity_units} RCUs")

    return seconds

def get_big_boi_with_client():

    start = datetime.now()
    response = DDB_CLIENT.get_item(
        Key={"PK": {"S": BIG_BOI_PK}},
        ReturnConsumedCapacity="TOTAL",
        TableName=TABLE_NAME
    )
    end = datetime.now()
    seconds = (end - start).total_seconds()
    capacity_units = response["ConsumedCapacity"]["CapacityUnits"]

    print(f"Reading Big Boi from a Client took {seconds}s and consumed {capacity_units} RCUs")

    return seconds

if __name__ == "__main__":
    # create_table()
    # store_big_boi()

    n_experiments = 10
    experiments_with_table_resource = [get_big_boi_with_table_resource() for i in range(n_experiments)]
    experiments_with_client = [get_big_boi_with_client() for i in range(n_experiments)]
    print(f"Average latency over {n_experiments} requests with the table resource: {statistics.mean(experiments_with_table_resource)}s")
    print(f"Average latency over {n_experiments} requests with the client: {statistics.mean(experiments_with_client)}s")

If I increase n_experiments, it tends to get even faster, probably because DDB caches internally.

Still: can't reproduce.


Update 2

After learning you're running Lambda functions, I ran the tests again inside of Lambda with different memory configurations.

Memory n_experiments average time with resource average time with client
128MB 10 6.28s 5.06s
256MB 10 3.26s 2.61s
512MB 10 1.62s 1.33s
1024MB 10 0.84s 0.68s
2048MB 10 0.52s 0.43s
4096MB 10 0.51s 0.41s

As mentioned in the comments, CPU and Network performance scale with the amount of Memory you assign to a function. You can solve your problem by throwing money at it :-)

4
  • I just added my script to identify the latency and added a snapshot of the dynamodb item in the question section. Please check it
    – siva
    Mar 2, 2021 at 19:29
  • my dynamodb table is there in us-east-1(N.Virginia)
    – siva
    Mar 2, 2021 at 19:30
  • I updated my answer to check for an item that is more similar to your nested data structure - still can't reproduce. Did you check the metrics for throttling?
    – Maurice
    Mar 3, 2021 at 13:08
  • 1
    Fantastic stuff. I think the lesson learned here is that lambda performance scales with memory. Even if the memory seems sufficient, tweaking the value can lead to substantial performance improvements. Mar 5, 2021 at 22:24
3

It sounds like you have a few issues. The first issue is that you're running up against the 400kb item size limitation. Although you don't say this is an issue, it may be worth revisiting your data model so you can store more event data.

The performance issue is unlikely related to your data model. The get_item operation should have an average latency in single-digit milliseconds, especially since you're specifying an eventually consistent read. Something else is going on here.

How are you testing and measuring the performance of this operation?

The AWS docs have a few suggestions from the about troubleshooting high latency DynamoDB operations that may be useful.

4
  • Basically there is a 400kb issue in my dynamodb table. so I am accessingitem and then calculating the size and then truncating the 400kb item into 200kb item. Todo this task, I am first accessing dynamodb item using get_item but get_item is taking around 5 seconds to get the item
    – siva
    Mar 2, 2021 at 1:56
  • I am calculating time of operation using python's - datetime module
    – siva
    Mar 2, 2021 at 1:57
  • Are you logging to Cloudwatch? I'm wondering if the actual request for DDB is taking 5 seconds, or if there is something else taking up all that time. Check out the DynamoDB metrics in Cloudwatch to see if it's really DDB that's taking that long: docs.aws.amazon.com/amazondynamodb/latest/developerguide/… Mar 2, 2021 at 3:42
  • I just added a snapshot of the my Dynamo DB item in the question section, please check it
    – siva
    Mar 2, 2021 at 19:35

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