0

I need some help with a task which is about creating a function that only accepts integer numbers to then multiply each other until getting only one digit. The answer would be the times:

Example: function(39) - answer: 3 Because 3 * 9 = 27, 2 * 7 = 14, 1 * 4 = 4 and 4 has only one digit

Example2: function(999) - answer: 4 Because 9 * 9 * 9 = 729, 7 * 2 * 9 = 126, 1 * 2 * 6 = 12, and finally 1 * 2 = 2

Example3: function(4) - answer: 0 Because it has one digit already

So trying to figure out how to solve this after many failures, I ended up coding this:

function persistence(num) {
   
  let div = parseInt(num.toString().split(""));
  let t = 0;
  
  if(Number.isInteger(num) == true){
    
    if(div.length > 1){
      
      for(let i=0; i<div.length; i++){
        
        div = div.reduce((acc,number) => acc * number);
        t += 1;
        div = parseInt(div.toString().split(""))
        
        if(div.length == 1){ 
          return t } else {continue}
        
      } return t
              
    } else { return t }
       
  } else { return false }
  
  }

console.log(persistence(39),3);
console.log(persistence(4),0);
console.log(persistence(25),2);
console.log(persistence(999),4);

/*
output: 0 3
        0 0
        0 2
        0 4
*/
  

It seems I could solve it, but the problem is I don't know why those 0s show up. Besides I'd like to receive some feedback and if it's possible to improve those codes or show another way to solve it.

Thanks for taking your time to read this.

///EDIT///

Thank you all for helping and teaching me new things, I could solve this problem with the following code:

function persistence(num){
  let t = 0;
  let div;

  if(Number.isInteger(num) == true){

    while(num >= 10){

      div = (num + "").split("");
      num = div.reduce((acc,val) => acc * val);
      t+=1;

    } return t

  }
}

console.log(persistence(39));
console.log(persistence(4));
console.log(persistence(25));
console.log(persistence(999));

/*output: 3
          0
          2
          4
*/
5
  • if ( length is 1) return 0 ? – epascarello Mar 1 at 23:05
  • 1
    Please edit your title to something meaningful to future users thanks – Dexygen Mar 1 at 23:41
  • Where do you see that @epascarello, it returns t, which is updated with a count? – Shannon Hochkins Mar 1 at 23:46
  • No! Shannon, t is never "updated" have a look at my "best hint". – Louys Patrice Bessette Mar 1 at 23:50
  • I did not see it, I was suggesting it... – epascarello Mar 2 at 1:23
0
function persistance (num) {
    if (typeof num != 'number') throw 'isnt a number'
  let persist = 0
  while(num >= 10) {
    let size = '' + num
    size = size.length
    // Get all number of num
    const array = new Array(size).fill(0).map((x, i) => {
        const a = num / Math.pow(10, i)
      const b = parseInt(a, 10)
      return b % 10
    })
    console.log('here', array)
    // actualiser num
    num = array.reduce((acc, current) => acc * current, 1)
    persist++
  }
  return persist
}
console.log(persistance(39))
console.log(persistance(999))
0
1

You've got a few issues here:

let div = parseInt(num.toString().split("")); You're casting an array to a number, assuming you're trying to extract the individual numbers into an array, you were close but no need for the parseInt.

function persistence(input, count = 0) {
    var output = input;
    while (output >= 10) {
        var numbers = (output + '').split('');
        output = numbers.reduce((acc, next) {
            return Number(next) * acc;
        }, 1);
        count += 1;
    }
​
    return count;
};

For something that needs to continually check, you're better off using a recurssive function to check the conditions again and again, this way you won't need any sub loops.

Few es6 features you can utilise here to achieve the same result! Might be a little too far down the road for you to jump into es6 now but here's an example anyways using recursion!

function recursive(input, count = 0) {
    // convert the number into an array for each number
    const numbers = `${input}`.split('').map(n => Number(n));
    // calculate the total of the values
    const total = numbers.reduce((acc, next) => next * acc, 1);
    // if there's more than 1 number left, total them up and send them back through
    return numbers.length > 1 ? recursive(total, count += 1) : count;
};
console.log(recursive(39),3);
console.log(recursive(4),0);
console.log(recursive(25),2);
console.log(recursive(999),4);
15
  • persistence != recurssive and it isrecursive – epascarello Mar 1 at 23:08
  • OP definitely is learning much things by working on that function... It isn't really a good "service" to give the pro solution without the relevant explanations. – Louys Patrice Bessette Mar 1 at 23:09
  • I hadn't finished my answer @LouysPatriceBessette – Shannon Hochkins Mar 1 at 23:13
  • Ok... But take in account OP was mistaken by just what console.log prints... I don't think the "latest" ES6 features are the first things he should learn. – Louys Patrice Bessette Mar 1 at 23:16
  • 2
    Thank you so much Shannon! I had no idea I could create an array doing this var numbers = (output + '').split('') allowing me to have only numbers in there, as well as I also thank you for showing me some es6 features that yes, it's kind of advanced to me but it's still helpful. I learned many new things with you guys @LouysPatriceBessette @ShannonHochkins – Ranfring Mar 2 at 22:48
0

console.log() can take many argument...

So for example, console.log("A", "B") will output "A" "B".

So all those zeros are the output of your persistence function... And the other number is just the number you provided as second argument.

So I guess you still have to "persist"... Because your function always returns 0.


A hint: You are making this comparison: div.length > 1...

But div is NOT an array... It is a number, stringified, splitted... And finally parsed as integer.

;) Good luck.


Side note, the calculation you are attempting is known as the Kaprekar's routine. So while learning JS with it... That history panel of the recreational mathematic wil not hurt you... And may be a good line in a job interview. ;)


My best hint

Use the console log within the function to help you degug it. Here is your unchanged code with just a couple of those.

function persistence(num) {
  let div = parseInt(num.toString().split(""));
  let t = 0;

  console.log("div.length", div.length)
  
  if (Number.isInteger(num) == true) {
    if (div.length > 1) {
      for (let i = 0; i < div.length; i++) {
        div = div.reduce((acc, number) => acc * number);
        t += 1;
        div = parseInt(div.toString().split(""));

        if (div.length == 1) {
          console.log("return #1")
          return t;
        } else {
          continue;
        }
      }
      console.log("return #2")
      return t;
    } else {
      console.log("return #3")
      return t;
    }
  } else {
    console.log("return #4")
    return false;
  }
}

console.log(persistence(39), 3);
console.log(persistence(4), 0);
console.log(persistence(25), 2);
console.log(persistence(999), 4);

3
  • Jesus are you seriously?? I want to die now haha I really thought I could solve despite having those zeros but that had made me happy anyway hahahaha... Thank you so much for giving me your advice as well as telling me I was trying to do the Kaprekar's routine! – Ranfring Mar 2 at 15:52
  • Learning is making errors. Don't "die" each time!!! lol. About this math challenge: you are multiplying the digits while there are more than one. So the key is about being able to split them and check the length of the array... while... ;) – Louys Patrice Bessette Mar 2 at 16:44
  • Okok got it! I'm going to try it again >:) thank you again! – Ranfring Mar 2 at 20:19

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.