-2

I have lots of conditions and if I wrote it with if .. else it works fine but may be hard to read for others (especially if it will grow in future). Is there any better way how to rewrite it in more readable way?

My code:

func(el: IHeadlines): boolean => {
  if (el.type === 'Cars' && el.label) { return true; }
  if (el.type === 'Bikes' && el.storage) {
    if (el.storage.filter(el => el.id === 1).length >= 1) { return true; }
    if (el.storage.filter(el => el.id === 2).length > 1) { return true; }
  } else return false;
}

interface IHeadlines {
  type: string;
  label: string;
  storage: [{id: number; name: string}]
}
4
  • can you add more details like what is el and what is the expected output. I would also recommend code review SE – depperm Mar 2 at 11:44
  • Comments may help a great deal. The code itself seems OK to me, the only change I would really suggest is removing the else before return false; since the code would have already done return true; if any conditions applied, and it's technically wrong right now because it may not return anything sometimes. – Niet the Dark Absol Mar 2 at 11:45
  • Instead of el.storage.filter(el => el.id === 1).length >= 1 you could write el.storage.some(el => el.id === 1) – Wendelin Mar 2 at 11:49
  • do you have only different id in storage or could you have more than one from the same? are you sure about the length comparison? why with one greater or equal and with two greater than one? – Nina Scholz Mar 2 at 12:06
-1

I'll suggest you something like this:

func(el: IHeadlines): boolean {
  return el.type === 'Cars' && !!el.label ||
    el.type === 'Bikes' && (
      !!el.storage?.find(el => el.id == 1) || el.storage?.filter(el => el.id == 2).length > 1
    );
}
1

If you ask me, I create a function that counts the value and the code will be much more readable.

function count(arr, tar) {
  cnt = 0;
  for(let val of arr) {
    if(val === tar)
      cnt += 1;
  }
  return cnt;
}

You can write your function this way, this is way more readable to me:

const func = (el) => {
    if (el.type === 'Cars' && el.label)
    return true;
    
  if (el.type === 'Bikes' && el.storage)
    if(count(el.storage,1) >= 1 || count(el.storage,2) > 1)
        return true;
      
  return false;
}

Or this way:

const func = (el) => {
  if (el.type === 'Cars' && el.label)
    return true;
        
  if ((el.type === 'Bikes' && el.storage) &&
     (count(el.storage,1) >= 1 || count(el.storage,2) > 1))
    return true;

return false;

For this is much more readable, however you can change the count function to any other way you like, and I would prefer using this code even if it is longer but it is much more readable.

0

Have you tried using switch-case? for example:

function(el)=>{
switch(el.type):
  case 'Cars':
    return true;
    break;
  case 'Bikes':
    return true;
    break;
  default:
    return false;
}

After this, you can perhaps put if-else before 'return' in each case.

0

hello, i do some optimize. I wish this can help you.

const oldFunc = (el) => {
    if (el.type === 'News' && el.label) {
        return true;
    }
    if (el.type === 'Research' && el.storage) {
        if (el.storage.filter(el => el.id === 1).length >= 1) {
            return true;
        }
        if (el.storage.filter(el => el.id === 2).length > 1) {
            return true;
        }
    } else return false;
}

// do some optimize
const newFunc = (el) => {
    let flag = false;// default return false
    flag = ((el.type === 'News' && el.label) || 
    ((el.type === 'Research' && el.hasOwnProperty('storage')) ? el.storage.some(o=>[1,2].includes(o.id)): false)) && true;
    return flag;
}

// test code
const testData = {
    type: 'News',
    label: 'test'
};

console.log(oldFunc(testData));
console.log(newFunc(testData));

const testData2 = {
    type: 'Research',
    storage: [
        {
            id: 1,
            name: "John"
        }
    ]
};

console.log(oldFunc(testData2));
console.log(newFunc(testData2));

// test result
// true
// true
// true
// true
1
  • Thanks! It's also great way to rewrite my function, except if I have data with storage: [{id: 9}] where only one id I receive true, while need to have false, as if (el.storage.filter(el => el.id === 2).length > 1) { return true; }. But anyway It was a great idea! – user15308065 Mar 2 at 12:36
0

Two ways come to my mind, but none of them will make your code very clear because conditions are dirty stuff.

  1. If you return boolean, you don't need if..else blocks. Just return the conditions.
func(el) => {
  return (el.type === 'Cars' && el.label) ||
         (el.type === 'Bikes' && 
             (el.storage?.filter(el => el.id == 1).length >= 1 ||
              el.storage?.filter(el => el.id == 2).length > 1)
         )
}
  1. You can extract the group of conditions to separate functions and call them in the main function.
const checkForCars = (el) => { return el.type === 'Cars' && el.label }
const checkForBikes = (el) => { return // your conditions}
const mainFunction (el) {
   return checkForCars(el) || checkForBikes(el);
}
1
  • Thanks! As for me, the first way is the best decision, except I've done some small changes to always get Boolean (in your code I can get el.lebel or smth) – user15308065 Mar 2 at 12:32
0

I generally try to be as descriptive as possible. Rename func to what the function does.

For readability, you could also create a function in el called, isCar(), isBike(), hasStorage() etc etc which would encapsulate that logic. I'm not sure if that makes sense based on what you provided. You are also inline hard coding ids. It would make it clearer if el contained some const / var or something in your app had them, which described the id. You could also rename el to something descriptive. You can remove some if by doing what Guerric P said.

Even the filter functions could be moved if they were going to be reused..

const shedFilter = (el) => ...(function code here)

Then provide some comments if anything is not clear.

const STORAGE_SHED = 1;
const SOTRAGE_GARAGE = 2;

aGoodName(el) => {
  if (el.isCar()) { return true; }
  if (el.isBike()) {
    if (el.storage.filter(el => el.id === STORAGE_SHED ).length >= 1) { return true; }
    if (el.storage.filter(el => el.id === SOTRAGE_GARAGE).length > 1) { return true; }
  } 
else { return false };
}
0

Step 1: To have exactly same logic as you had - you can start with extracting the conditions/function and trying to avoid return true and return false statements. You can easily return condition itself.

  const isNews = el.type === 'News' && el.label;
  const isBikes = el.type === 'Bikes' && el.storage;
  const storageItemsCount = (el, id) => el.storage.filter(el.id === id).length;

  return isNews 
           || (isBikes && (storageItemsCount(el, 1) >= 1 || storageItemsCount(el, 2) > 1)

Step 2: further I would remove "magic" id 1 and 2 values and explicitly specify what they are about, like

const BIKE1_ID = 1;
const BIKE2_ID = 2;

no we can generalise the counts check with specifying

const minBikeCounts = {
  [BIKE1_ID]: 1,
  [BIKE1_ID]: 2
}

const bikeCountsAreValid = el => {
   return Object.entries(k)
          .every(
             ([id, minCount]) => el.storage.filter(el => el.id === key).length >= minCount)
}

so the main flow simplified to

const isNews = el.type === 'News' && el.label;
const isBikes = el.type === 'Bikes' && el.storage;

return isNews || (isBikes && bikeCountsAreValid(el))

Step 3: We can see a pattern of "Check if type is supported with some extra check". We could extract the knowledge of supported types to separate structure. Now if we want to add new supported type we don't need to remember all if/else statements across the codebase, and just add new one here:

const supportedTypes = {
 News: el => !!el.label,
 Bikes: el => !!el.storage && bikeCountsAreValid(el)
}

no if statements at all in our main function:

const isSuppotedType = 
   (el: IHeadlines) => supportedTypes[el.type] && supportedTypes[el.type](el)
0

Good clean code practices suggest that you have small functions and have a self-describing code.

In your code, I would make each Boolean logic become a variable or a function.

Example 1

func(element: IHeadlines): boolean => {
    const isCarWithLabel = element.type === 'Cars' && element.label;

    if(isCarWithLabel){
        return true;
    }
    const isBikeWithStorage = element.type === 'Bikes' && element.storage;

    if(isBikeWithStorage){
        // rest of your logic that I don't know...
    }
    return false;
}

Example 2

func(element: IHeadlines): boolean => {
    return this.isCarWithLabel() || this.isBikeWithStorageAndSomethingElse();
}
-2

Your code could be simplified with a single expression like this:

const func = (el) => {
  return !!(
    (el.type === "News" && el.label) ||
    (el.type === "Research" &&
      el.storage &&
      (el.storage.filter((el) => el.id === 1).length >= 1 ||
        el.storage.filter((el) => el.id === 2).length > 1))
  );
};
3
  • 1
    This really isn't any more readable than the question – Wendelin Mar 2 at 11:46
  • It's also not the same function, if el.label is not falsy then el.type === "News" && el.label will just return the value of el.label, not true... which could have massive side-effect whenever used. – Ben Mar 2 at 11:50
  • @Ben I have added a double exclamation mark for this purpose. I personally find this more readable. It clearly shows that the function does nothing but return a boolean value from an expression which is pretty long but also pretty clear. – Guerric P Mar 3 at 7:52

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